Interview Attire

I have applied to a machine shop looking for apprentices. This week I will have in interview and was wondering the typical attire for this
type of interview. I've always been taught to dress neatly in the typical attire of the employees working there. Shop attire there is typically jeans and a t-shirt.
I have no time to purchase any clothing due to my schedule. Would wearing a pair of work pants and a dark t-shirt be okay? That would be typical attire of the employees there. The only other option I have is a 3-piece suit, which I believe would be out of the question for this type of job.
Sorry if this seems like a stupid question.
Thanks
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I would suggest slacks and a good shirt. Jeans and t-shirt are not acceptable. If you've only got a 3 piece suit then wear the pants and shirt. Show them you'll go out of the way to be just a bit better than they expect. I've interviewed candidates where clothes have made a difference. I would assume, as an interviewer, that if you didn't care for you looks then you probably wouldn't care how the parts you made look either. lg no neat sig line

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mr electron wrote:

Sounds like you don't really have a choice. Between the two, I'd pick the work pants and t-shirt. Make sure they are spotless and nicely pressed.
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Wear the slacks from your suit along with the tie. I haven't seen anyone wearing a three piece suit in about 15 years.
When I was in your position I always wore a tie and more often than not was offered the job. You only get one chance to make a first and lasting impression. If they get 20 or so applicants that they interview, what are you going to do to stand out? If nothing else taking the time to dress up and look your best will show that you are serious.
Will you feel out of place? No doubt. The prospective employer will almost always comment on the way you're dressed. Often along the lines of "you're not dressed for working in a machine shop. Are you sure this is what you want to do?" The best response is "If you want me to start today, I'll run home and change." "I just figured if you were going to give me some of your time, I would show you that I respect that." Sounds corny but it works.
When applying for an apprentice job make sure to ask questions about what they do and how they do it. Avoid questions along the lines of "What's in it for me?" Apprentice jobs rarely if ever have negotiable wages and/or bennies. You also want the employer to know that you have mechanical ability. If you know how to read a micrometer, have some experience, etc. make sure they know that as well.
For this type of opening an employer will often ask what your habbies are. Fixing cars, woodworking, etc. are always good. But don't lie. You never know if the guy is a gearhead or a woodworker himself. Another question is what do you want to be doing in ten years? Have an answer ready. "Right now I plan on being the best journeyman in your shop" is a pretty good answer. I answered "Your job" once and was offered the job. The guy laughed and said, "Well at least your honest." I wouldn't use that as a pat answer but it felt right at the time.
Anyway, good luck and I hope you get it.
--

Dan


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That's because they haven't sold them in 20 years. Myself I like to get three piece with 2 pairs of pants. Often I never even don the jacket and the vest carries the day.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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Good advice. I'd bring the change of clothes. Leave it in the car, or bring the rucksack if you're hoofing it.

Too pat, too corny for my taste. "Shucks darn, you betcha. I even warshed behind the ears this morning." Or better: "My Daddy taught me to show the proper respect. I brung me some proper work clothes, right chere, just in case." Always think, plan, and stay one step ahead. Not just in the interview, but all through life. It's easy if you're serious about your work. There's no way to fake it if you're not.
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I would just answer "I am dressed for interviewing".
i

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Ignoramus12004 wrote:

That's a good answer. No bullshit to detect there.
Chris
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On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 16:44:54 +0000 (UTC), with neither quill nor

"I'm dressed for interviewing but I brought work clothes with me. They're in the truck. Shall I get them? I can start immediately."
--
"Simplicity of life, even the barest, is not misery but
the very foundation of refinement." --William Morris
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I would suggest the shirt and pants from your suit. I would NOT wear a tie nor would I wear a suit jacket.
If you have a shop apron, I would suggest bringing it (but not wearing it). If they want you perform an operation on a machine (which is highly unlikely), you can put it on.
Be sure to take it easy. If you're desperate for a job, they'll smell it and you won't get it.
Best of luck.

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Slacks of some sort and maybe a nice polo style shirt. I'd go with the cheapy WallyWorld versions. Throw a pair of overalls/coveralls in your bag or car in case you're asked to demonstrate your skills.
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"mr electron" wrote: (clip) I have no time to purchase any clothing due to my schedule. (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Do you live in an area where no stores are open evenings? I would MAKE the time if it matters to you. For an interview, I think you should look a little neater and dressier than the guys working at the machines. Your suit with a tie might look a little pretentious, so I would settle for an shirt with an open collar, worn with your suit pants, and some kind of a light jacket, sport coat or windbreaker. (I'm a slob, but I know when not to look like one.)
During one interview, I was told, "You will get your hands dirty." My answer must have been OK, 'cause I got the job. I said, "Good." Hope YOU get the job.
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wrote:

It's a good question.
Neat, clean and understated is far better than "fine raiment". I'd be more favorably disposed to an apprentice applicant in a clean pressed cotton or chambray shirt and pressed (yes, pressed) Levi's or work pants than one in a hotshot suit. If the shirt has pockets with flaps, button them. He isn't looking for a salesman, but one who is capable of precision and attention to small details.
I'd recommend wearing a real shirt, not just a tee shirt. You can shed the shirt if you're asked to demonstrate your skills, but wear a real shirt for your office visit.
Get a haircut. It needn't and shouldn't be a $40 "do", just a neat, clean haircut. If you have a beard or moustache, groom it or have it groomed as in trimmed neatly. Again, attention to details. (Don't ask how many ways I spelled "moustache" before I got it right.)
If you wear leather shoes, shine them. If you wear workboots, clean them up and treat them with mink oil or whatever you use so they look well-maintained. Don't wear Nikes.
You should look as meticulous and functional as the work he wants done. Skip the aftershave and cologne. If you have any odor at all it should be eau d'Tapmatic or perhaps a hint of Hoppe's #9.
If I sound "military", it's no accident. "Military" suggests discipline, particularly to a veteran, and precision metalworking is definitely a discipline.
Don't ever think you can bullshit an interviewer other than HR pukes who thrive on bullshit -- but you'll not be dealing with them, I hope. Experienced managers and foremen have very good bullshit detectors. They have to. If you don't know the answer to a question, the best response is "I don't know but I can find out." Be prepared to say how you'd find out, because that'll be the next question. I always asked at least one job-relevant question I was pretty sure the applicant couldn't answer, just to see what he/she would do with it. If I got a smoke 'n feathers bullshit dance, that was a reject even if they looked good up until then. I was pinging for integrity.
Answer every question fully and honestly, then shut up and sit still, look pleasant -- but shut up. Be able to be quiet, let the interviewer lead. That was another test I used. He or she who can't be still when they have no material contribution to offer would not be a good member of my small team.
Expect ambiguous questions. If you don't understand a question, make it clear what you didn't understand about the question before you respond. That's another test. A machinist must understand what is ezpected to get it right. The print should convey that, but prints don't always convey all relevant details e.g. schedule or what machines and materials are immediately available for the job.
After he or she is done, it doesn't hurt a bit to ask a polite intelligent question or two yourself to subtly establish that the interview is a mating dance that cuts both ways. It can subtly confirm your presence as competent applicant rather than supplicant. That can be very effective. It isn't bullshit, just good psychology. It has always worked well for me. It cost me a couple of jobs that wouldn't have fit me well, and I'm convinced it got me better offers for the jobs that did fit. Both were good outcomes.
Good luck!
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As a fellow who hires 25 part time employees a year, I'd tell you to read this advise three times. Its spot on.
I continue to be amazed at people who show up for jub interviews with dirty clothing, too many body rings, smelling of last night's alcohol, and only interested in what it pays and do I have to work every day.
Karl
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Don's advice is spot-on.
A tie would not be out of place IMO, even without a suit jacket.
Jim
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On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 01:44:05 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, Don

Grok that and concur.

Your're a truly sick and twisted man, Don Foreman. Ironing Levis, indeed! ;)
-------------------------------------------------- I survived the D.C. Blizzard of 2003 (from Oregon) ---------------------------- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development --------------------------------------------------------
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| After he or she is done, it doesn't hurt a bit to ask a polite | intelligent question or two yourself to subtly establish that the | interview is a mating dance that cuts both ways. It can subtly | confirm your presence as competent applicant rather than supplicant. | That can be very effective. It isn't bullshit, just good psychology. | It has always worked well for me. It cost me a couple of jobs that | wouldn't have fit me well, and I'm convinced it got me better offers | for the jobs that did fit. Both were good outcomes.
Ditto on all previous commentary. I want to add a _very_ important point that most job seekers miss severely. You are looking for a good employer, and the employer is looking for a good employee. Inasmuch as the employer is marketing his pay, working conditions, and benefits in exchange for skills, you are marketing your skills in exchange for benefits, pay, and working conditions that will satisfy you. In a nutshell that means that don't think that you need a job as much as the job needs you. It tends to relax your attitude during the interview, which helps you not be so nervous or "needy." Any hiring managers will concur, and if not, 'fess up now! At the interview, I really hope you will have researched the company thoroughly. You can find a lot in public records of business licenses, who's who in the business, and so forth. One job I enjoyed (at first anyway...) I think I blew the owner and service manager away because they spent more time answering questions than asking, including a couple they couldn't answer but "would get back to me." At my most recent job interview, I sensed that the job would have been way too much fun, and since everyone had such good things to say about working there I had to ask: "What about this job sucks?" To my surprise, the supervisor stammered a bit in trying to answer, then admitted he couldn't answer it properly, so he called in a few others and left the room. I was really impressed with that and that the employees were really up front with me, finally owning up a certain bit of office politics. I later found out that the only reason I didn't get the job was that a known quantity employee returned, and since I didn't have the needed security clearance, it couldn't be me, but I impressed him at any rate. Had this other fellow not come back, I am convinced I'd have one of the coolest jobs in the world, in one of the coolest places to work in the world, with the coolest toys money can buy (wish I could explain in more depth, but it was military research and stuff.) The only thing that wouldn't have been cool would have been the commute, but I think I could offset that by actually _wanting_ to go to work.
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Don Foreman wrote:

Excellent advice.
With regards to "Level" of attire (suite and tie or t-shirt), dress one notch better than the highest person you are *likely* to see but not so much better tht it appears you think you are better then them. Dressing below the interviewer is often percieved as not taking the interview seriously and dressing much above is often percieved as thinking you are "better" than them. Sometimes it's a hard razor blade to walk but you can rarely go wrong if you shoot for the "one notch" better level. FYI, the "one notch better" is because interviewers usually think they are dressed better than they actually are :)
CLEAN AND NEAT IS EVERYTHING. This includes personal grooming such as well washed hair, clean shaven, and clean/neat fingernails. Clean and neat also applies to verbage and speech. Speak clearly and avoid bad grammer and slang unless it really fits. Anyone who says "he axed me...." around here is out he door unless they are speaking of a personal assault with an axe. people often get into lazy speech habits like "gunna", "wanna", "goin", and similar which are best to avoid. Nothing wrong with them in casual conversation but they might make the difference if the interview is "close".
Make sure you have a good pen with you also. Simply having to ask to borrow a pen can be the death of an interview...it instantly makes you seem unprepared.
Koz
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Some interview tips.
Show up on time.
Dress cleanly and shave. Attire depends on the kind of job, for a machine shop type of job I would just wear jeans and a shirt, but I would make sure that they are freshly washed.
An easy way to go through an interview is to get the interviewer to talk about himself or what he or she does, and then listen attentively using "active listening" techniques. People love to talk about themselves and, when there is someone who seems to listen, then start feeling (with no basis in reality) that the other party is an intelligent, pleasant person. Whereas all you have to say is stuff like "this is interesting", "could you tell me the reason for that decision", etc.
It helps to remember what the interviewer actually says and then bring it up at a relevant moment later in the conversation.
That's what Dale Karnegie recommends and I must say that it works almost every time.
It will not get an unqualified person hired, but it does help anyone to get a more favorable impression.
Bring various papers with you, diplomas, certifications, photos of your previous work, whatever that could give you some credibility. Interviewers do not always look at these papers in detail, but showing them usually gives the interviewee some credibility.
Make sure that you remember all employment dates, otherwise you might appear that you are lying on your resume, even though in fact you may just be forgetful.
If you have a spouse or a partner, get her/him to ask you most embarrassing questions prior to interview, to get a little bit of confidence building.
i
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Let the record show that it was written back on Mon, 26 Sep 2005 13:28:42 GMT in rec.crafts.metalworking :

    I keep a small notebook, several sheets of paper stapled together pamphlet style. Names, dates, addresses, wages, phone numbers, supervisor's name, kind of work. Fits in a pocket, and I don't have to try and remember everything. (Working through temp agencies for a couple years, there were a lot of jobs, and I needed to know what I was doing when just for my own sake.)     I also have a copy of a background investigation form, where I list all my jobs, and everyplace I've lived. (Plus mother's maiden name, Father's military service, and other esoterica.) This does two things, keeps my records straight, and makes it "easy" if I ever have to fill out another one. What the heck, They(tm) have a dossier on you, you might as well keep your own file. :-)
tschus pyotr
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as an explaination for the decline in the US's tech edge, James
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