Is 90A 110V MIG welder big enough to fab handrail w/ balusters?

I want to fabricate a steel handrail with balusters for a staircase, the balusters are 1/2" square tubing, and the handrail is 1 3/4" wide solid steel. Will a 90A mig welder create good welds for this?

Also, I want to make window boxes out of 1/2" solid steel bar, and wanted to know if that welder will be sufficient for that also. Thanks

Reply to
nscarnati
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Sounds borderline to me, and the duty cycle would be low. Consult the spec sheet for your welder, and if you don't have one, most are available on the Internet.

This is why I suggest so strongly when guys ask which MIG to buy, I say the

220V. one. (220, 240, whatever) You don't run up against the limits of your machine, therefore limiting your own capabilities. Plus, they're not that much more, and not hard to wire a box for.

Steve

Reply to
Steve B

A decent one will. The Lincoln Pro-MIG 135 or 135T would work OK for this, although you have to pay attention to your duty cycle. If you don't know what you're doing with MIG welding, I'd do the window boxes first - better to have a failure there than have someone fall through your staircase railing. You'll have to have pretty good fitting chops to make a clean stairway railing, you know.

Grant

Reply to
Grant Erwin

Rule of thump: 30A per mm thickness for steel. You do the math.

Nick

Reply to
Nick Mueller

How about this one.

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Max (considering the purchase)

Reply to
Max

On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 23:00:03 GMT, "Max" > what you're doing with MIG welding, I'd do the window boxes first - better

For very little more $ you can get a lot more welder:

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Reply to
Don Foreman

Hard to say because you don't mention metal thickness either on the tubing or on the handrail. 14 gage sure, 3/16" marginal and slow,

I'd bet large that you would very soon wish you'd spent a few $ more for a 220-volt machine as perhaps the Hobart 187. Huge difference in capability for about 16% higher price.

The little 110-volt boxes are excellent for sheetmetal, as autobody, but they're not nearly as suitable for fabricating with thicker metal.

Reply to
Don Foreman

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Yabbut, it runs on 220. I already have a 220 machine. (Millermatic 251) I'm looking for a welder that'll run on 110.

Max

Reply to
Max

On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 23:00:03 GMT, "Max" > what you're doing with MIG welding, I'd do the window boxes first - better

I would suggest using straight CO2 rather than 75/25, cause its a much hotter arc. With a bit more splatter. Shrug

And MUCH cheaper than 75/25

Gunner

"Deep in her heart, every moslem woman yearns to show us her tits" John Griffin

Reply to
Gunner

On Thu, 01 Feb 2007 02:47:32 GMT, "Max"

Reply to
Don Foreman

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