Large Metal Drill Bits for Green Wood?

OK, so it's only vaguely on topic, but you guys have a wealth of expertise that's too good to pass up.
I have a couple of large (2.5' diameter) stumps to get rid of. I'm not
in a big rush, and I have some "stump rot" chemicals to speed up the decay process. The trees were maples, and they were cut down about 2 years ago. I need to bore some large holes moderately deep into the stump to pour the chemicals into. I figure 1" holes about 8" deep should be good.
Any idea what would be the best sort of bit for this? Some sort of auger to get the chips out? I've only got a 3/8" electric drill, and I'm not sure that has the oomph required for an auger. The alternatives are a brace & bit, or a trip to the tool rental shop.
Thanks for any suggestions.
Doug White
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Go to the drill bit store and buy several spade bits. Irwin Speedbores are an excellent brand, DeWalt has a line of much heavier ones out. Drilling in the dirty stumps is extremely hard on bits. You can sharpen these bits with a triangular file, or just buy several. A decent 3/8 drill should be able to do the job. You will only get 6 inches out of the bits, but should suffice. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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wrote:

I've got plenty of spade bits, but they tend to clog up with wood chips pretty fast, even in dry wood. They're great for boring through a 2x4, and I've even got extensions so I could go deep, but I'd think they would clog up the holes fast in green wood. Easy enough to try, and you're right, they are easy to sharpen, which could be important.
Doug White
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Doug White wrote:

Spade bits are precisely wrong as can be here. You have to have centerless augur bits. You can buy one at a local hardware store, or get the whole set for $15 http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber6251 or less when they go on sale, of course.
If your drill is too wimpy borrow a bigger one. Deep holes in hardwood require an augur. Shipwrights built large ships for hundreds of years boring holes in hardwood, if there were a better bit they'd have found it.
Grant Erwin
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Spade bits cost a dollar or two a few years back when I drilled the holes in my stumps. They worked just fine. I agree an auger bit would be better, but it will probably be wasted in the effort and they cost quite a bit more. Spend your money as you see fit. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net
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I just went out & tried a couple spade bits with my 12V 3/8" cordless drill. I had a 7/8" with the little spurs at the edges, and a 1" older one that was just two flat cutting edges. Both worked, but they were pretty slow and I had to clear the chips very often. If I didn't get the chips out completely, the bits tended to slide around on the chips and not cut. An auger that would lift out the chips would definitely be a big help. One freshly charge battery was good for 2 holes about 5 to 6 inches deep. I've got 3 stumps, so I think investing in a auger would be worth it. The 1/2" corded drill will also be a big help.
Doug White
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Grant, I am familiar with the bits that you are recommending. But, why exactly are they called 'centerless'?
Thanks, Ivan Vegvary
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Ivan Vegvary wrote:

Because they are a spiral ribbon with no center! :-)
GWE
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Might want a spoon bit - that scoops out wood using a brace and it as the bit. They might make them for 1/2" drills.
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member http://lufkinced.com /
Grant Erwin wrote:

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Doug White wrote:

I would use a regular twist drill and one that is about 3/8 th inch in diameter. The fertilizer or stump remover will speed up the rotting preocess. Using a 3/8 th drill , I would drill more holes, but the smaller drill will be a lot faster. The surface area of three 3/8th holes is slightly bigger than the surface area of a 1 inch hole. So small drill and lots of holes.
Dan
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The problen with small holes is that they are also short holes; deep er holes are better. Also there is volume; it takes four 1/2" holes to equal the volume of a 1" hole, and you need volume to pour the liquid in or you have to go out 10x as often to top it off.
--
Free men own guns - www.geocities/CapitolHill/5357/

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They make an extender shaft for more reach.
Wes S
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On Sun, 17 Sep 2006 15:22:30 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@alum.mit.edu (Doug White) wrote:

When I did this a long time ago, I got a ship auger and used a brace. I packed the holes with potassium nitrate, watered it well, then covered for about three months. Then I soaked the stump with diesel a few times, then lit it. It smoldered for a week. When it was over, there were just tunnels in the dirt where the roots had been.
Pete Keillor
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On Sun, 17 Sep 2006 11:40:44 -0400, Pete Keillor

How deep did you go with the holes, how big were your holes, how many'd you drill?
(3 foot maple stump in the yard that won't give up)
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On Sun, 17 Sep 2006 15:42:49 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@NOSPAM.hfx.andara.com wrote:

18" chinaberry stump, 14" high. Three 3/4" holes 12" deep with side holes connecting. The can (Stump-Not) had instructions on how many holes, etc. Also, there wasn't a problem burning in that location, and the stump was at least 30' from the house. Check your fire ordinances before deciding on this route.
Pete Keillor
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On Sun, 17 Sep 2006 12:49:05 -0400, Pete Keillor

And get a utility locate Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Cut the 3' down to near the ground less mass and close to kill the roots. Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member http://lufkinced.com /
Pete Keillor wrote:

-
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snipped-for-privacy@NOSPAM.hfx.andara.com says...

The quickest way to get rid of a stump? Start calling it a lawn chair.
Ned Simmons
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On Sun, 17 Sep 2006 15:22:30 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@alum.mit.edu (Doug White) wrote:

Spade bit with an extension. Though a 3/8 drill is marginal for just about anything, including sheet rock screws...
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
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wrote:

I remembered I have a half-inch Bosch combination drill/hammer-drill that should help. I ordinarily use it just for masonry work, so I hadn't thought about it for this. I also did some digging on-line about augers, and these guys:
http://advantage-drillbits.com/auger.html
look like they know what they are doing. They make augers for drilling railroad ties, bits for timber frame construction, etc. They have carbide tipped augers that should hold up better against any dirt caught in the stumps. What remains to be seen is how expensive they might be. Regular steel 3/4" x 18" augers seem to run around $30. I'm going to give them a call Monday & see what they recommend.
In the meantime I have to figure out why the outside outlet nearest the stumps is dead...
Doug White
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