Lathe on the way



    O.K.
    Except that another posting shows that there can be significant grit trapped inside a gearhead lathe.

    You'll have to ask the fellow who has done it, and who posted last night (unless he has already answered in this thread). What he found was blisters of paint holding large clumps of sand in the corners of the gearcase. If that is the case, it *might* stay put with only slow cutting all the time, but with high spindle speeds stirring up the lubricant, it might well pop those blisters and let the sand get into circulation with the oil. I wonder whether there is a filter to capture that grit?
    I've never seen the inside of a gear-head lathe.
    Good luck,         DoN.
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Could you lift one end at a time and put blocks under the pallet?
My engine hoist has a small range of load and boom extension where the jack is strong enough but the center of gravity is near or forward of the wheels and the crane will either tip immediately or is unstable enough to tip when the load swings. Luckily I found this out by calculation when reconstructing the missing boom load chart. You can weigh the mast end and measure from there to the hook-end wheels to find how many foot-pounds of moment arm the hook will support without tipping. The problem of course is knowing the load's weight. If you lift the load an inch or two and then heave up on the mast you'll see if it's close to tipping.
When I have to move something heavy I lower the load onto timbers placed across the engine hoist's base and roll it like a pallet jack.
I've attached a trailer tongue jack to the upright mast and added extra wheels and a handle like on a pallet jack, which makes the hoist much easier to muscle around on dirt and lets me tow it with my tractor.

If you set up an angle plate as a stop for the other end, you can turn the piece in the vise and mill each top edge. As long as the angle plate is square to the table it will stop the tubing at the same place each time regardless of where the high spot touches it.
Jim Wilkins
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Jim,

Don's reply got me thinking about that. IIRC, my hoist's boom will not over-extend, though if it starts to tip with the load on the ground, I'm not sure it's a big risk??

I have used the same trick. Once the base is attached and it comes time to slide it into place, I might prefer to keep it just off the ground; I look forward to being that far along.

My goal is to get nowhere near dirt on this move :)
Thanks!
Bill
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On Sat, 22 Mar 2008 05:51:03 -0700 (PDT), Jim Wilkins

Ahem. Counterbalance on the ram end of the engine hoist?
I plan to cut a small chunk of plywood into a platform to fit over the legs of mine at that end, and then stack bricks or concrete blocks, two 5-gallon buckets full of sand, or other 'found weight' as needed to achieve stability.
If you have barbell weights, all it would take is a chunk of pipe to slide them onto, big mouse clip and a flatwasher to keep them there.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Mar 22, 4:48 pm, Bruce L. Bergman

The original load chart may have considered tipping, but I only had the max load with the boom fully in to work backwards from.
The best counterweight would be the tractor if I can figure out a way to mount a fixed hitch coupler that doesn't interfere with the trailer jack and its swivel handle. Otherwise it's only a problem when I help the neighbors unload a welder or such off a truck (my stuff isn't that heavy) and several of the guys can just stand on it rather than watching, drinking beer and wisecracking.
----------------------------------------------------------- Thanks for getting me thinking. A rope from the mast top to the trailer hitch coupler that's already on the handle end will be enough to keep the hoist from tipping and it won't interfere with manhandling the hoist into position. That fixed coupler would still be useful to allow the tractor to back it up without jackknifing.
Jim Wilkins
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The 12x gear head is a very capable lathe. Good bang for the buck. You should be pretty happy.

That will work, but there is not much reason to get lift gate service if you are doing half the work. As another poster said, it is best to just go to the terminal and have the machine fork lifted into your truck. Avoids having to schedule and wait for delivery, too.
A 2-ton engine hoist will handle the lathe very nicely. You can move the carriage around for balance, though I used a load balancer and two straps. The lathe did not tend to tip with the backsplash on, but wanted to tip without it.

I cut away parts of the pallet and crate to get the hoist around mine.

I like the Rohm keyless chucks.

Definitely go through "Machine Shop Essentials" by Marlow.

You can put the square tubing inside round tubing or pipe, secured and centered with screws, then hold the round in the chuck and steady.
Have fun! Alan
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On Fri, 21 Mar 2008 23:08:56 -0400, Bill Schwab
<snip>

<snip> ===========One dodge is to use your lathe as a horizontal mill.
fabricate a block to hold a HSS lathe tool to the face plate. This is your fly cutter.
Remove the compound and rig up a way to hold the square tube on the cross slide. Use the cross slide to move the tube in and out past the fly cutter. An angle iron with a spacer underneath should be adequate loction. May be a little "fiddly" to set up, but cheap.
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
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George,

I plan try some things like that. One of the reasons I wanted to skip the threaded spindle machine is that I realized I would want to do a fair number of interrupted cuts. My mill-drill serves me well, but facing plates can be a pain - I have to really stay on top of the vertical feed (the lock is not enough) to get good results. There isn't much else that it does or fails to do that bothers me. I realize I will almost certainly end up buying a bigger mill some day, but see no need to rush into it. So far, I suspect I might want a baby bridgie with a riser block, but I have yet to find that :(
Whether or not dumping my facing work on the lathe is a good idea, it will be a good addition to my shop, and it is past time for me to learn my way around one. My hope is that this will be my "second" lathe, meaning I hopefully skipped the starter machine and got something that will meet my long-term needs for a lathe.
Bill
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wrote:

For me the scariest part of the job is getting the heavy stuff off the truck on to the ground. I ended up renting a forklift for that. If they can put it on the ground for you, I'd consider that half the battle. I don't know how steep your driveway is or if it is paved. I'd arrange to put 1x6 as runners on the bottom of the pallet, then put it all on pipes. Alternately use strong casters. I'd tie the lathe to the truck to keep it from rolling downhill. Then having one person on each side of the lathe, back the truck up slowly, and move the pipes as they come out to the other side. Once in the garage, move it wherever you want. After that use different size blocks of wood and a 50" pry bar to slowly lower it down. You'd end up cutting away the pallet. Use the hoist if you can get it in place. My friend had an older hoist that wasn't vee shaped, so it could stradle the lathe.
I did the reverse process of pulling a lathe out of a unpaved driveway uphill. Used a truck to pull it and 2 2'x4' sheets of 3/4" plywood.
Wayne D.
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