looking to replace B&D 1/4 corded drill

I dropped my 'old' Black & Decker 1/4 inch drill motor (now called corded
drill ???), and broke the brush holder among other things. Tore down and
put brush back (even though holder itself was 'missing'). Seemed like a
good fix untill I drilled 3 holes the other day. Then it quit again, with
the telltale smell of burnt electrical ????
So, after Google search, visit to Walmart, Lowes, Ace Hardware, and check at
Sears.com, I haven't been able to locate a replacement!
Does anyone know where a 1/4 inch corded drill (relatively cheap) can be
obtained? Or am I looking for something that is no longer manufactured?
Yes, there are a few out there, but at $100 dollars and up, not for my
occasional need once or twice a year.
Thanks in advance,
Ace
Reply to
Ace
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Funny you should ask. That was exactly what was on my Christmas wish list. Mine was so old it had the cord that was 12" long. I got so sick of the cord being so short. The short cord wasn't a bad idea because you needed an extension cord anyway. But the plug kept getting caught on the edge of the workbench.
I pulled it out and installed a cord about 6' long from a hand mixer that gave up the smoke. The drill has fast rpm's so it was great for drilling small holes, until I got the cord wrapped around the chuck and now it don't work no more. Didn't get one for Christmas. Wife couldn't find one. I'll be curious to see the responses to your inquiry
Reply to
Dan
"Ace" wrote in news:8MQgj.397459$ snipped-for-privacy@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net:
Are you looking for a 1/4" for its size or its speed?
Single-speeds @ 2500-3000 RPM are available with a 3/8" chuck for as low as $10.
Variable speeds @ 0-1200 RPM are available with a 3/8" chuck for as low as $20.
Small-sized units all seem to be either battery-powered or pneumatic.
The 1/4" chuck size seems to be well on its way to extinction.
Reply to
RAM³
Buy a variable speed 3/8" or wait for the garage sale season. 1/4" drills are virtually obsolete.
Reply to
clare at snyder.on.ca
snip....
I think Makita still makes one, at 4500RPM it is good for small holes in sheet metal, I'd imagine they would be popular with home aircraft builders who don't have (or don't want to listen to) large air compressors, when I got mine it was about $60, but that was a while ago, they could be $100 now, so that might be one you saw. Even if they were $60, for "occasional need once or twice a year" I'd get a cheap 3/8" drill, which are much more common and can be had much cheaper Jay
Reply to
Bob's my cat
Jeez, around here those go for like a buck at garage sales. If I had an old Black & Decker 1/4" corded drill motor which broke, I'd light a candle to the saints and bless my lucky day, and go buy a cordless drill.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Look in pawn shops, and the less desirable ones (like 1/4") just wait for someone like you to come along. Also look in places that rebuild tools.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
As others noticed, 1/4" corded drills cost nothing at garage sales and liquidations. They are not adequate for very many real life needs. I would frankly look for at least 3/8" capacity, which will still cost you next to nothing.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus306
i finally killed mine last year
poor thing i beheaded it. I snapped the threaded arbor off inside the chuck right at the shoulder
it was older than i was and i finally had to upgrade to a true Dewalt. I could find the model but i might have half scrapped it too.
but really the old drills are almost not worth it to fix due to a lack of parts and the need to machine a replacement if you cannot find the part (Some of us can make the parts but my replacement drill does work better too)
I think its gonna die unless you find a yard sale replacement in the spring
Reply to
Brent
I still have the "Portable Electric Tools" drill I bought from Canadian Tire in 1957 for $17. It has wired several houses, drilled softwood with an 1 1/4 spade bit, swung a 6" grinding wheel and 6" wire brush and much more abuse over 50 years. Twenty years ago I straightened the output shaft after second son borrowed it. No! I won't sell it. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
Ace
I bought my last =EF=BF=BD" drill at a Nut and Bolt place that has lots of tools for sale. Copper State Nut & Bolt I think it is called. The drill is a Bosch. Real good quality. Typically I would like a longer cord but I can cure this desire by simply opening up the drill and putting on a longer cord. 20' would be nice.
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Have you tried Home Depot or Lowes?
Bob AZ
Reply to
Bob AZ
I was in Sams Club the other day, and they had a "Channellock" 24vt cordless drill, charger and two batteries, for $49IRRC
2 speed, with a 2 speed gearbox, torque clutch and so forth.
Im quite impressed, and the charger actually behaves like its supposed to. MONDO torque. As a test, I ran in (4) 5/16x3" lagbolts into a 4x4, and while it grunted towards the end, it didnt slow down appreciably.
Why bother buying a rattly 1/4" corded drill, when you can buy a more capable cordless for the same money?
If you simply have to have a 1/4" corded drill, the Close Work drill at Harbor Freight is $24. Works fine.
I took the 1st one back after one of my helpers tried to drive 3/8"x2.5" lagbolts. He ran the biggest portion of a box of 100, before the gears locked up. Harbor Freight simply handed me a new one.
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
Anything decent, a drill that will take some abuse and still run, is going to cost you $50 bare minimum. Going cheaper can be done (Harbor Freight) if you treat it very gently, but they won't take any abuse.
The Black & Decker Division is now the "cheap consumer grade" product where people buy on price alone - they have set the DeWalt division as the heavier duty line for rougher conditions.
Buy good tools, and you can hand them down to your grandchildren. Our Sunbeam finish circular saw is pushing 40 years old, and still runs fine. I have some drills and saws even older, and I'm having a hard time finding 4"x21" belts for a ancient Skil belt sander that refuses to die. (Mail Order Only, it looks like.)
But I did go buy a Skil MAG-77 worm-drive framing saw so I have the proper tool for the proper job.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
On Tue, 08 Jan 2008 21:13:28 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm, Ignoramus306 quickly quoth:
Someone gave me an extra 3/8" B&D drill motor and I tossed a $10 HF 1/2" chuck on it. I use it for drilling deep holes in houses or RR ties with my HF augers. The front bearing is leaking its stinky lube but it's still the Everready bunny of drill motors.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
On Tue, 08 Jan 2008 21:34:25 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm, Gunner quickly quoth:
I picked up a $250 Bosch 14.4v Impactor last year and it's by far the best drill I've ever owned. It's strong enough to change my wheel lugs. Phillips screws don't cam out, you don't need to push hard to keep the bit in the screw, and all sorts of other bennies. The batteries will last most of the day even when assembling decks and wooden swingset/fort/playhouses.
Impact drivers are where it's at for long fasteners in wood. HF had a set of 1/4" hex to 1/4, 3/8, and 1/2" square drives for $1.49, so I picked up 3 sets and keep them handy. It'll drive nuts and bolts all day, too.
Bosch tools are excellent investments, but we're way out of the OP's budget now.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I have a cheap 3/8 B&D drill and a more expensive 1/2" DeWALT corded drill. (also a cordless 18v DeWALT) If I want to use a corded drill, I prefer the B&D where I can get away with it, due to its lower torque. Prevents wrist sprains and such.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus23170
For aircraft building a cheap 6 or 7.2 volt cordless, picked up at a garage sale with dead batteries and run off a 12 volt car battery works just fine!!!!
Reply to
clare at snyder.on.ca
wrote: For aircraft building a cheap 6 or 7.2 volt cordless, picked up at a
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I've done that. Some of the old cordless drills are considered worthless because of the cost of a replacement battery. Running on overvoltage gives you extra power and RPM. I'm not sure how long you can run it this way, but mine never quit. Drilling holes is not usually continuous duty.
I kept mine in the truck, so it was always there when something broke on one of our Yamaha Enduros.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
my favorite heavy duty drill is a 3/8 Rockwell - it has a 7 amp motor - it's their industrial series from the 70s - I drilled holes for conduit in a LOT of 2X4s with that drill and it was such a nice improvement over the 1/4 inch drill it replaced - and much better than most 1/2 inch drills -
Reply to
William Noble

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