making a burner for a gas grill


Greetings
I have an old gas fired table top model grill. Cast Aluminum with a
milled flat top. I've had it for fifteen years, and am unable to find
_any_
maker marks or trade marks or the like. So - I can't identify
it.
But I like it, works well. or it worked well, till the burner
gave up. Split open. "No Problem" I'll just get a replacement. Only
the replacement is a little large, but it fits - barely. The old one
is 2 3/4 by 12 1/4 while the new one is 3 1/2 by 15 1/2. With a
little tweaking, it all went together.
But I can't get it to stay lit. Even with the regulator cranked
wide open - no joy. Least breeze seems to blow it out. I suspect
that it is set up to burn more gas than the regulator can provide.

So, I am considering options.
1) Find a proper sized one. I'm not sure where, but that seems to
be a long shot.
2) too many holes in the new burner, so plugging some of the holes
might help.
Tooth picks would work, at least at the beginning. If I had a
torch I could solder some of them closed. Maybe muffler cement and
something to hold it in place. I think duct tape isn't going to work.
So, option three: make one. Sheet metal seems to be the best
option, and if I can figure out a mandrel it might work. Hmmm -
bolt two pieces together, with a spacer ... is aircraft grade AL a
good idea?
That's going to be a lot of drilling, but ...
any suggestions on how to go about this, or where I might be able to
find out more about finding Real Replacement Parts? That milled top
means I can fry onions on the top while it heats up and the burgers do
their thing, which is one reason I don't want to just run out and get
a replacement.
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
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"Bob La Londe" on Fri, 9 Jul 2010 00:04:16 -0700 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
Long way to go (I'm up near the Canadian Border) but shall attempt to check them out.
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
If you still have the old burner maybe you can estimate the total area of all the orifices using a proper sized drill bit. That might give you a better idea of what you need to do to modify the replacement.
Reply to
Denis G.
"Denis G." on Fri, 9 Jul 2010 20:57:07 -0700 (PDT) typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
I have the old burner, or rather the two halves. The bottom half is in pretty good shape, but the top half burned out ... I could just make anew top and see how that works .... Thanks for the inspiration.
tschus pyotr
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
"Stormin Mormon" on Sat, 10 Jul 2010 10:47:21 -0400 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
I'll have to check for that. I suspect more of a case that the new burner has more capacity than the old. Hmmm - how to test?
tschus pyotr
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
(...)
Do we know that the burner is compatible with natural gas?
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--Winston
Reply to
Winston
Winston on Sat, 10 Jul 2010 12:01:53 -0700 typed >> "Stormin Mormon" on Sat, 10 Jul
If I switched to natural gas, I would have difficulty using it as a table top model, which is what it is.
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
You could drill the burner orifice oversize and see if that results in an acceptable flame.
(See fourth picture down:)
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--Winston
Reply to
Winston
Winston on Sat, 10 Jul 2010 16:43:54 -0700 typed >> Winston on Sat, 10 Jul 2010 12:01:53 -0700
The suggestion was made to flatten a tin can and put holes in that. "That's an idea!"
pyotr
Mind, I didn't say it was a "good idea"
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
The orifice is part of the gas valve assembly, not the burner, yes? (See fourth picture down:)
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Our symptom appears to be a 'lean' mixture, not 'rich'.
We need to drill the orifice to supply *more* gas to the replacement burner (which is 61% bigger than the original).
pyotr > The old one is 2 3/4 by 12 1/4 while the new one pyotr > is 3 1/2 by 15 1/2.
(...)
pyotr > I suspect that it is set up to burn more gas than the pyotr > regulator can provide.
I believe you are on the right track, Pyotr. Groovy!
Drill baby, Drill!
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
Propane runs at higher pressure, so the orifice is smaller. Are you converting from propane to NG, or using a propane burner on a NG system? Might have to drill open the orifice, a bit.
The test is in performance. If it works right, or not.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
"DanG" on Sun, 11 Jul 2010 13:08:39 -0500 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
What I have is a propane grill, a table top model, which I got used some 15 plus years ago. Used it camping several times. Seven years or so ago, I "modified" it for home use, to use the 20# propane tank, by getting a hose to screw in where the bottles do and connect to the larger propane tank. Andy & Bax in Portland. Much cheaper, too. Last week, the Burner "wore out", and I got a generic replacement unit from Ace Hardware. Transferred the Venturi from the old burner to the new burner, and the only thing different is the burner itself. (The 'standard' flexible venturi doesn't work, because it was not designed for a table top model.)
Cranked up to High, I get a small flame - although all around the edge. But if there is a gust of wind, it goes out. Not good. (Not as impressive as the time I was delayed in lighting it, and the entire thing had filled with propane. "Whoompp!" as the gas lights off; "Clank!" as the lid jumps up a little and drops back down. It "fires" from the closed lid position.).
And like I said, it is a generic model - in that I can find no maker's marks at all. It is cast aluminum, with a cooking surface milled on the top of the lid, (ObMetalWorking Content) It is very much like a vintage auto that you want to keep running because you like it, only like that classic Gremlin, finding parts is a pain.
Well, I have actually gotten a lead for a possible place which actually is not too far out of the way (for some values of far.)
But I appreciate the advice offered. Who knows, it may fit.
pyotr
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Winston on Sun, 11 Jul 2010 11:03:42 -0700 typed >> Is there a chance that the orifice is made for Natural Gas?
Maybe I can just plug the holes from the outside. Fewer holes, less gas needed
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
(...)
Notice how the flame travels 'domino fashion' from hole to hole when you light the burner? What would happen if half the holes were plugged and there was a delay of say 45 - 60 seconds until the 'rear bank' of holes finally lit?
Whoomp! _Skillets In Space_
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
Winston on Sun, 11 Jul 2010 22:54:55 -0700 typed >> Winston on Sun, 11 Jul 2010 11:03:42 -0700
Been there, done that - one more reason for heavy skillets, and the like.
What I figure to do is plug the holes on the end, so that hte flames are not reaching the actual wall. But you raise a good point - lighting after this modification. Could be a wee tad more energetic.
I will have to ponder this carefully.
Reply to
pyotr filipivich

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