Making diamond glass cutter



Oh, that's interesting. I see there are some suppliers here in NJ, although I'll probably have to coerce the quanitity I'd need. I might want to try making a diamond dresser that way. I probably have 8 carats or so of bort, bought back in the 1930s by my uncle, who used it for lapping gages.
Thanks, Dan. I see that article dates from the early '50s. Is that the way it's done in industry today?
-- Ed Huntress
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Mostly what I see are special alloy bonds (solders or brazes). Good luck finding out what they are made of though.
Every once in a while we use diamond "plated" or "impregnated" tools. They all look like they are some sort of solder or braze. Then there are the PCD and natural diamond tipped inserts. They look brazed to me, but how they do it I don't know. I'll have to ask some of the tooling guys now that my curiosity is up. The big thing nowadays is diamond coatings. Used for non ferrous alloys of course.
--

Dan

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I did a patent search for "diamond" and "brazing" in the title. There were 13 hits. The most recent patent to come up is 6,889,890, which is right on point. The titanium appears to be essential.
Joe Gwinn
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Now you're getting somewhere. Is the titanium part of the brazing alloy?
-- Ed Huntress
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Yes.
Joe Gwinn
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On Wed, 14 Nov 2007 22:05:41 -0500, "Ed Huntress"

Titanium is added to some stainless steels to prevent the growth of chromium carbide at elevated temperatures, which leads to intergranular corrosion. As I understand it, the titanium has a high affinity for carbon, so titanium carbide is formed in preference to chrome carbide.
Perhaps this affinity for carbon at elevated temperature is the reason for the Ti "flux".
--
Ned Simmons

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Titanium Hydride is coated on the Diamond and that amalgamates with the Silver-Copper and it is in turn bonded in another amalgamate on the Carboloy cylinder.
The trick naturally was the Hydride of Titanium. One can paint with that. Possibility one could try Titanium Oxide but it might not amalgam well if at all.
Martin Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
Ed Huntress wrote:

-
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On Sun, 11 Nov 2007 15:44:23 -0500, "Ed Huntress"

ed the way that they are made and the way that a friend made his was to electroplate a solution filled with diamond dust on to the carrier. in the case of a saw you slowly rotate the edge of the disk through the electroplating mix. nothing actually glues the diamonds they are just enveloped in the deposited electroplate. graham didnt find the making of his terribly difficult. he found that his home made ones were far better than the commercial ones because his actually were loaded with diamonds. when they wore out he stripped the existing residual plating back into the electroplating mix and then just coated them back up again. he did a lot of inspiring model engineering with his before his health started to fail.
Stealth Pilot
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wrote:

Now *that's* serious hobby metalworking. What did he make with these tools?
-- Ed Huntress
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On Mon, 12 Nov 2007 11:50:04 -0500, "Ed Huntress"

he was building a table top sized model of a steam pumping engine of the type originally used on the perth to kalgoorlie water pipeline. it was a scottish corliss steam pumping engine of quite an advanced design.
his work was/is absolutely exquisite. the intent was a functional working model. much of the scaled detail was done by spark eroding, which leaves a hardened surface behind. diamond files were needed occasionally to persuade a piece into a more accurate shape or to clean up the lines between cuts. quite the most inspirational model building I've ever seen.
(if I could only hit a tenth of the quality in the time I have available) Stealth Pilot
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Lots of talk about cutting glass, with some excellent responses.
Question:
What do you do with glass that requires the cuts you've mentioned?
Harold
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Oh, no special projects are at hand, but I've made a jewelry box with a glass-pane lid, and replaced some decorative cuts in the glass in my front door. Most of my glass cutting was done a lot time ago, when I made the glass display shelves for my parent's store.
-- Ed Huntress
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Bort is the toughest of diamond forms. Often used as Grinding wheel dresser. Will it have a sharp enough edge for glass ?
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
Ed Huntress wrote:

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Thanks, Ed. Curiosity had the better of me. My mind had drifted to working leaded glass.
Harold
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Harold sez:
"Thanks, Ed. Curiosity had the better of me. My mind had drifted to working leaded glass."
So, Harold - you "came" to the wrong conclusion ?
Bob Swinney
"
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Robert Swinney wrote:

Bob, you fracture me with your colorful remarks.
--Winston
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Hmmmm! I have always been able to read Bob's posts, but of late they are not appearing on my computer, although quotes of his comments are. What the hell's going on?

Well, he didn't say that wasn't a possibility. I feel somewhat vindicated. :-)
Harold
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Granted. Compression fracture will find a flaw.
But my Mineralogy book stated the bort is the toughest of all diamond forms. None are as on a finger until split and ground. I suspect the best way is to place it in a hole of sorts to hold it - in a wood stick - and then with a sharp edge place it and whack a corner or edge off. That preserves the bulk and creates an edge.
Think of turning a cutter into work a bit hard and the lip layer shears or fractures off.
I suspect the case-hardened hammer allowed some give so the hammer wasn't hurt!
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
Ed Huntress wrote:

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Well, it's standard, old gagemaker's tool. You put the diamond piece on a steel plate (used here as an anvil), and lay a piece of leather with a hole over the top of the diamond, so the diamond is in the hole. Then you put a piece of paper on top, and rap away. The diamond chips are trapped in the hole in the leather, and the paper keeps them from flying around.
Then you take the diamond grit, pour it into a bottle of olive oil, and shake it up. With a pipette, you draw off the diamond as it settles to the bottom. The size of the grit relates to the time you let it settle; I forget the drill, but you draw it off into different vials, and let *them* settle. Then you charge a lap with the grit that settles to the bottom of the vials, selecting the size you want.
That's also how precision toolmakers used to make internal grinders for precision internal grinding, for making master jigs and so on, boring and grinding them on a lathe. Instead of a lap, the grinding tool was a mild-steel rod, into which you'd drive the diamond with the hardened hammer.
It was a tedious business. Thank goodness for plated-diamond points and jig grinders, eh?
-- Ed Huntress
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