Mechanics gloves

I was wondering if anybody else had any experience with these.
I thought these were a kind of Jesse James wannabe item when they came
out but I have to admit I really like them for general wear around the
shop.
The only problem is the pair of Mechanix brand I had fell apart very
quickly. I spend a lot of time in my shop, but I don't do it for a
living anymore, so I suspect that for someone who does these gloves
wouldn't last more than a couple of weeks. Mine only lasted about two
months before the fingers started ripping through.
Anybody have any experience with any of the other brands? The Stanley
ones looked like they maybe more durable.
Regards,
Bill
Reply to
mtlwright
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I have a few pair..
They generally hold up really well, but there are a few 'grades' built for specific work. My 'Kawi green' pair finally gave up when I used them for reroofing the house and garage. Asphalt shingles sure are abrasive......
Check out the Mechanix website to see if there is a pair more suitable to your uses.
Pete
Reply to
Pete Snell
mtlwright wrote in article ...
These gloves have been around for a l-o-n-g time....many years before "Monster Garage" television show came to be....so, they're definitely NOT a Jesse James wannabe item....not by any stretch of the imagination....
I go through a half-dozen pair per year working on race cars at the track....
I've tried the Ringers and Craftsman clones, but I like the original Mechanix Wear best...Don't know anything about the Stanley gloves, but I'd guess they're simply another clone.
When the "real" Mechanix Wear gloves go on sale at the local retail auto parts store for around $15.00USD, I buy a few pair....so, I always have fresh pair when I need them.
Bob Paulin
Reply to
Bob Paulin
At 15 dollars US I wouldn't mind so much. Up here I've never seen them on sale and they go for roughly 25 to 28 dollars US. (39.95 Canadian).
Bill
Reply to
mtlwright
Stanleys are on sale at my local HF store for $5/pair...
Reply to
Emmo
I seem to have better luck with the ones Permatex offers. Look and feel identical, seem to wear longer. I agree about the MW ones tearing early. Around the shop, I like the Thick Latex gloves for most work. I also use some nitrile.
mtlwright wrote:
Reply to
Rex B
Check Grainger, Wells Lamont MechPro gloves. 1VD31-34 depending on the size. Catalog price is about $16, I get them for about $14. Get them so they fit tight! I generally were a large, but I get these in medium. They hold up as well as Mechanix brand, maybe better, at less money. Greg
Reply to
Greg O
At first I thought they were kind of "wussy" as in real mechanics don't use something like this. However, after wearing a pair for awhile, I decided they are really worth it. I have a Craftsman pair that have held up great. You can find them on sale every now and then.
I also tried them a couple weeks ago when I had a bunch of wood to sand with an orbital sander. They sure help protect against that tingly feeling from running a sander for an evening as well.
Reply to
Jim K
Jim K wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
(c8
The first ones that I ever saw *were on the hands of the mechanic* who'd just performed a minor miracle: he'd gotten my wife's Colt Vista running again.
Personally, I'd prefer to use the Dickies brand goatskin version but, unfortunately for me, they don't offer one quite large enough for my hands.
The Stanleys are similar to the Mechanix but a bit higher. (Mechanix are under $15 at Wally World)
FWIW, I've also been known to use batting gloves as an alternative.
Reply to
Eregon
[ ... ]
I'm amazed that this has not yet erupted into the traditional "don't wear gloves in a machine shop" thread. Granted, you have suggested that they were being used in wrenching on automobiles, not running machine tools, but considering the newsgroup, at least one caveat about wearing them while machining would seem to be reasonable.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
SNIP - I'm amazed that this has not yet erupted into the traditional
I operate under the assumption that we are all members of the clan MacHinery and understand that I was talking about use for wrenching, cutting steel, fabrication, etc.
Anybody who wishes to wear them while running machinery is welcome to, if they don't mind risking their fingers, etc. I also assume most people on this newsgroup are more 'attached' to their digits.
Bill
Reply to
mtlwright
I have some I've kept is pretty good shape for about a year, but I switch gloves as needed. For example, I wear fingerless leather gloves when doing really nasty undercarriage work so that no matter how much I grease them up I can still hold onto a hammer, I don't rip up my palms on wrenches, and I can pick up little things like nuts and cotter pins. But for pretty much all other jobs the Mechanix get used, and work fine. I don't really baby them, but I don't abuse them either. However, that said, I got 'em as a gift and will probably go back to just using leather gloves all the time once these wear out as I haven't noticed a whole lot of advantage with 'em aside from the velcro strap.
Reply to
B.B.
I work on race and street cars a fair amount and have always used latex or nitrile gloves. Other than an ability to handle hot objects, I'm not sure I see the advantage of using the heavier Mechanix style gloves so haven't even put any on. It always seemed to me that one would lose any feel that one has. Why do you wear them rather than the thinner stuff?
Peter
Reply to
Peter Grey
On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 02:21:17 GMT, the inscrutable "Peter Grey" spake:
I agree wholeheartedly. I recently tried the Mechanix gloves at Wally World and the GoJo gloves at HF. I dare anyone to pick up one of Snap-On's shiny chrome wrenches with a pair of those on.
Nitriles are 10x tougher than latex, handle chemicals well, and fifty pair cost the same or less than one pair of the cloth/leather gloves.
I'll wear the thicker gloves when I have to wrestle used cars and rusty sheet or plate metals, but not for normal auto work.
-------------------------------------------- Proud (occasional) maker of Hungarian Paper Towels.
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
Is there any problem wearing the blue nitrile gloves when using machine tools?
Reply to
Aaron Kushner
Well, they don't rip like latex gloves do. You can get 'em to rip, but if it gets caught, it might pull you in. I wear them often (EMT) and I don't think I'd want them around moving machinery. They're just too strong to rely on them coming off or away in a problem.
Dave Hinz
Reply to
Dave Hinz
I use them routinely, and the rip pretty easily. I go through about 1 pair/hour. For this reason they are my choice when working with machinery.
Reply to
Rex B
Maybe it's the nature of metalworking materials. Around patients, they're pretty damn tough to damage. Usually patients don't have sharp bits sticking out of them. (more often than you'd think, though...)
Silly question though - why do you wear gloves for working in the shop? Is it to keep the work clean, or your hands clean?
Reply to
Dave Hinz
Two reasons why I wear gloves in my shop:
1) I switch back and forth between wood and metal and while it is easy to wipe of grease from metal, it's not so easy to get it off wood.
2) I don't care if my hands are greasy, but my wife would rather my hands be clean.
3) Even when woodworking, I tend to use gloves as polyurethane glues turn skin black.
Recently, I started using protective hand creams and find them to work well.
Reply to
akushner
Some of both, but mostly to keep hands clean. Also, it's cold in the shop these days. And, the same nicks that tear the gloves otherwise would have torn skin. I bleed less when I use gloves
Reply to
Rex B

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