Working leather gloves from mcmaster

Would anyone recommend any mcmaster numbers for leather gloves. All my
gloves are used up, and dirty beyond recognition and torn, and I am
looking for something very nice. The HF gloves leave very much to be
desired, so I want to try my luck at McMaster-Carr. I have some money
to burn also and want to get something that I could use with pleasure
for a long time.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus8643
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You want the Tillman TIG welding gloves, forget the model number but I think they're deerskin. At any rate, use them for TIG welding and then when they get a bit grungy move them to general work glove duty and put a fresh pair into welding service. Since I found them I haven't used much of anything else for gloves. They aren't expansive either. McMaster 5346T5 or perhaps 5346T1.
Reply to
Pete C.
I have exactly those tig gloves for TIG welding, they are great but they are too thin for general stuff (like lifting things with sharp edges). I a looking for cow leather type gloves. McMaster has a little bit too many choices.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus8643
Have you tried the HF 'roping gloves'? They fit my hands perfectly and have become my favorite gloves of all time. They have an added patch around the grip area for the rope, but are thin and flexible, yet pretty good wearing. About 8 bucks, but they have them on sale frequently. They don't show up on the web site when I search, I guess they are a 'store only' item.
Reply to
DT
On Mon, 31 Dec 2007 23:23:53 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm, Ignoramus8643 quickly quoth:
I have dozens of pairs of various gloves and have found that if I use them for their intended purpose, they last a helluva lot longer.
Some are rubber (pvc?) coated (for glass) or dipped (for flagstone) for slippery work.
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Some are cotton canvas or knit for gardening.
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black dots make a big difference in their usable life.
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Some are jersey for winter warmth. I don't stay out long. ;)
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Some are split leather for tough work. These bleed the color onto your palms and wrists. Lovely.
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I generally wear nitriles or latex for chemical work and cleanups.
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?Itemnumber=36118 I wear XL split leather over jersey for doing blackberry vine removal. Most of the above gloves come in 6-pair packs for under $6 on sale. Nitriles go for as little as $4/100, latex $3/100.
And I have some of the U.S. General mechanic's gloves which work well but die early. I probably need to try a better brand. They're padded with leather palms, and the palms split/go away.
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Maybe these?
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Or one of these kevlars?
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?Itemnumber=95569
These deer/pigskin types are on sale and I'll try these next.
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I'll have to try these TIG gloves, too.
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The 90913s (dipped gloves) seem to work well and hold up under many harsh conditions. I've done lots of gardening work and installed about 150' of flagstone pathway with one pair so far. They're the closest to general purpose gloves I own. But when they get wet, they need to be washed out and dried in the dryer or they reek from mildew. The knit backs let out regular hand moisture, but the rubber fronts keep in the wet if you get them soaked.
Try those kevlars for your heavy sharp work and let us know how you like them, Ig.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
On Tue, 01 Jan 2008 00:29:39 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@SPAMwowway.com (DT) quickly quoth:
Are these the gloves you're talking about, Dennis?
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
Almost tempted to buy a pair to see if they can stop a round.
I hate buying gloves. Always seems one finger or more isn't sewn correctly.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
I haven't found that issue. At any rate, McMaster has a number of types of TIG gloves in different materials, as well as some MIG gloves in the same section that are presumably a little heavier.
Reply to
Pete C.
Carolina Glove and Safety Co. 800-557-4414
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Even more choices, but good folks to deal with and they'll offer suggestions based on what you tell them of intended use and what price you want to pay.
I buy my Kevlar gloves for blacksmithing from them. They sell left-hand only pairs because most smiths wear out the left hand gloves more often than the right. I usually order 2-3 left-hand pairs to each right/left pair
Reply to
John Husvar
Mix of US made and imports.
"SELECT SIDE SPLIT COWHIDE" reminds me of the "White Mule" glove that I used to be able to get at Farm & Fleet. Comfortable, stays on, palms are tough. Lasts for years. Made in US. $7.00
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John Husvar wrote:
Reply to
Louis Ohland
No, that isn't them. These are specifically labelled 'roping gloves' and are easy to spot with the reinforced area that warps around the base of the thumb. They are thicker than a TIG glove. I use them for carpentry, and even for driving in milder weather, they have no insulation for really cold weather. Some of the HF driving gloves are OK, but I find they are quite variable, I'll try on several pairs and only one has the leather I like so I stick to the roping gloves.
Reply to
DT
Iggy: Honestly. To me, it's like buying shoes through the mail. I don't do it, because I want to put them on and feel them. When I go to the welding store, I try them on. And, MOST IMPORTANTLY, I have found that the pair that fit the best, and have the best feel and touch are usually the cheapest ones! The one with the store's name, that are probably made by some big company with the store's name stamped on them. Look at the sales bin. Sometimes they have the expensive ones in there that they are trying to dump, and you get a pair for $8 that were $25 yesterday.
I have gloves that lasted for a very very long time that were less than half the price they wanted for the best ones. Not sure if you're talking about regular work gloves, TIG gloves, or welding gloves, but for my money, I want to try them on. I have had casts that fit more comfortably than some of those gloves. AND, I have found deals in those locally owned TOOL SHED TOOL TOWN TOOL WHATEVER type stores. Those nice Makita and Craftsman work gloves are nice. But for the price, this cheap old fart would just as soon go through five pairs of cheaper gloves. Or even ONE that lasts longer than those spendy pretty colorful ones.
Just me. All that extra money buys a lot of steel, gas, and rod.
Or adult beverages. Or a trip to the driving range. Or whatever winds yer clock.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
White Mule is an outstanding glove. Used to use them on ironwork.. DO NOT leave them laying around, or they blow away.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
On Tue, 01 Jan 2008 10:43:04 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@SPAMwowway.com (DT) quickly quoth:
I could have sworn I'd seen them but they don't come up in the 47 glove types returned on a search of the HF site. I wonder if they stopped stocking them.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
On Tue, 01 Jan 2008 08:48:48 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, Wes quickly quoth:
HINT: Do not try this with the glove on your hand. ;) I just might give 100:1 odds against their stopping a .22 short, more for real rounds. The thread and weave are much coarser than are used in bulletproof vests.
Yeah, and when you're lifting heavy loads or pulling hand over fist, those lumps between the fingers can get mighty painful.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Use my White Mule for gardening - the palms and fingers are thorn proof. Sadly, the canvas is not, but a full leather glove in summer is a tad warm. Blow away? More like they aren't nailed down...
SteveB wrote:
Reply to
Louis Ohland

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