Most lucrative business for a machine shop

I recently befriended two guys that started up a machine shop and they also do stampings on a couple of old presses. Nice guys, and they have
done stuff for me that I was too busy or machines tied up. Their work was OK and the price was right.
They are pretty hungry and are looking for work to pay the bills. What kink of jobs would be the easiest for them to find and what kind of jobs would be the most lucrative? I know, every machinist in the world wants the answer to those questions.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 15 Feb 2014 15:47:09 -0500, Tom Gardner wrote:

I suspect that the answer depends on them, their equipment, and the nature of the economy around them.
If they've got a couple of old manual machines, then probably just repairs and prototyping. If they've got NC machines and the know-how to program them, then some sort of short-run manufacturing.
Beyond that -- I dunno. I think every new business needs to go through a stage where they're starving and learning.
--
Tim Wescott
Control system and signal processing consulting
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/15/2014 4:18 PM, Tim Wescott wrote:

Very nice machines! But, all manual, they don't want to do long-run production. They prefer model making and very short runs. They also design and build dies, fixtures and assemblies.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, February 15, 2014 4:43:09 PM UTC-5, Tom Gardner wrote:

t
bs

ts

I would get a bunch of business cards and spend some time passing them out. Including to places with their own machine shop. I got a job making part s for a fishing rod company. A machine shop did not want to do the work as it involved a lot of hand holding. So they referred the owner to me.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No one will ever tell you how to make a lot of money with little capital. People do it, but they do not share the good ideas.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/15/2014 4:23 PM, Ignoramus8717 wrote:

I just want to see them stay in business. They started as a hobby, not to get rich, i suspect they already are but they won't offer their work unless in supports itself. But, I'm just guessing. Most people will gladly share ideas unless it directly competes with them, at least that's my experience.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I make money from, first, websites, second, buying and selling and scrap, and third, machinery moving and some welding.
I do not know how I could make money with a stamping press.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 15 Feb 2014 21:42:00 -0600, Ignoramus8717

Algebra.com, or more?

Stamp something someone (or lots of someones) need(s) a whole lot.
--
The most powerful factors in the world are clear
ideas in the minds of energetic men of good will.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 15 Feb 2014 22:11:24 -0800, Larry Jaques

==========subway tokens? :-)
--
Unka' George

"Gold is the money of kings,
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
F. George McDuffee wrote:

AK receivers .
--
Snag



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

New company: Iggy's AKs!
--
The most powerful factors in the world are clear
ideas in the minds of energetic men of good will.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What you will likely find out is that these big jobs do not pay enough to even cover the cost of materials and compliance.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yeah, regulations can double the cost of setting up a company and double or quintuple prices of product, but if the product or service is wanted, it will still grow. I'm forced to spend a couple grand a year for $500k liability insurance, $10k bond, $400 license fee, and a few hundred in continuing education. That immediately bumped up my fees considerably, from day 1 on, trying to recoup my initial outlay. To do plumbing or electrical work, I'd have to apply for additional contractor licenses (almost impossible to get journeyman's experience in) for both those types of work, so it ruled those out immediately, too. Lead and asbestos abatement are yet another 2 licenses. It is becoming ridiculous. I'm still trying to find out what regulations are for signmaking and installation. I'll likely need another license for a boom truck if I go that route. ChaCHING!

Kudos to Magpul for doing that, but it's a costly reaction to overregulation.

It's funny to see so many weapons mfgrs in New York, of all places. I'll bet full-color Bloomberg targets would be a hot seller there. Why settle for simple silhouette target paper, right?
--
The most powerful factors in the world are clear
ideas in the minds of energetic men of good will.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/15/2014 10:42 PM, Ignoramus8717 wrote:

Lots of companies need stamped parts but usually make them themselves or have a source and have already paid for the dies.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Exactly. Plus, there is a lot of costs to USA manufacturing, that do not exist in China, so the material and the product is often cheaper if made overseas. For a big enough buyer, even a penny per part difference is significant enough.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMOBqRVDOYQ

i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 15 Feb 2014 15:23:52 -0600, Ignoramus8717 wrote:

Most people that manage to make a lot of money with little capital are either very capable in some valuable way, very energetic, willing to do work that others don't find enjoyable, or some combination thereof.
If it's easy and lucrative, it's been done so much that it's not lucrative any more.
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/15/2014 5:21 PM, Tim Wescott wrote:

I think "lucrative" here means it pays the overhead with the least amount of time and effort, not to get rich. That frees up machine and people time to do more fascinating things. These guys seem to enjoy the work that involves being clever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 15 Feb 2014 15:23:52 -0600, Ignoramus8717

Tom, tell them to find out what people want, then make it for them. Honestly, _that_ is the key. It's also harder than hell to do.
Then once they're up and running with a good cash flow, they can find something they love to do--and can make money on--and shift toward doing more of that.
You found it in scrap, right, Ig?
--
The most powerful factors in the world are clear
ideas in the minds of energetic men of good will.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Over here we have several small "job shops". One does mainly stainless fabrications for yachts - we got three large marinas within a 20 Km distance. Another makes a profession out of rebuilding outboard motors, the kind that require welding back together again, and a third that does more general work - you want your excavator bucket rebushed, bring it by.
But all the shops aren't just machine shops, they all have welding equipment, Presses, big hammers, etc. so maybe a better term might be "I'll fix it shop" :-)
Any demand for that kind of work in your locale?
--
Cheers,

John B.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John B. wrote:

My niche up here in Arkansas is just that type of work , on a smaller scale . No big press yet , but most of the rest , and I get small jobs of all kinds - from teensy TIG welds to build up a shotgun ejector to boring 3"+ holes in 1.75" plate for a tractor-mounted tree processor .
--
Snag



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.