Most lucrative business for a machine shop

wrote:


Funny, you know. It used to be that every little town had a shop like that and it always seemed like they were busy. Now I'm getting the idea, at least from this site, that nobody fixes things any more and "machine shops" are all computer controlled :-)
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John B.
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On 2/16/2014 6:51 AM, John B. wrote:

There is a lot of marine activity in Cleveland. A big pleasure boat area.
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They need to let people know they exist.
Do they have a simple get effective website showcasing what they can do, and how they're willing to do it?
If not, they might as well close down now.
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Cydrome Leader wrote:

That's a pretty broad brush yer wieldin' there Cy ... up here in Stone County it's word-of-mouth that'll either make ya or break ya - some of these folks don't even know there *IS* an internet . Well , not really , but this ain't like any metropolitan area , we'uns is jus' a buncha hillbillies . Seriously , around here it's all about personal recommendations , a fella from "off" isn't going to make much if he doesn't get integrated into the local good-ol-boy network . I've been fortunate enough to make a few people happy , and the work is slowly starting to increase as word gets out that that guy out in Sunnyland has a shop and knows how to use it .
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It didn't sound like the new shop was setup in the middle of nowhere, but I could be wrong on that. Even if it was, there's got to be what, tens of dollars floating around the local economy to keep a new place in business?
Even here in a big city I was looking for a local printer to handle a simple job. It's apparently too hard for them to come up with pricing, even if you want in the shop.
Guess what- the job is probably going to an out of state internet printer, since they can provide a quote and the best pricing in the least amount of time.
Suck for the slow to adapter, backwards businessess who thing it's still the olden days.
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Cydrome Leader wrote:

As I said , it all depends on the market . BTW , I print my own cards . And flyers , etc .
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Tom Gardner wrote:

It is really hard to make money as a new job shop. There are TONS of them in the US alone, all looking for somebody that needs parts made. If you have contacts at a bunch of OEMs, they know you, how good you are, and send stuff they think you might be competitive with to bid on. If you are new, it is REAL hard to break into that "old boy's network".
A far better way is to design something yourself that has some kind of market, and then sell the items on eBay, Amazon or at the local flea market.
If you are in Wichita, it is kind of the capital of aerospace manufacturing, although there is a lot of that in Washington state, St. Louis, and I think South Carolina, too. Detroit is the hub of US automaking.
So, if there are any shops or manufacturers in their area, they should try to see some people there that contract out manufacturing. Make sure the manufacturers know you are flexible, can not only machine but assemble things and measure parts. When the mfg gets in a bind, they could get a call. Some companies try to run so lean that when one of their suppliers runs late, goes out of business, has a machine breakdown, etc. the mfg gets in a terrible bind, and can be very generous to get some help getting their production line back up.
Jon
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wrote:

Tawm, I forgot the best way to start out. Ask every shop in town what people are asking them to make, but that the shops DON'T make and/or won't make. You'll find a lot of tough stuff which sells for dirt cheap and isn't worth making, but you'll also get wind of the top dollar stuff nobody has time or inclination to make. That can be a real winner. My buddy Terry is doing that in LoCal. He started in electromechanical repair but has steadily increased his work in automating small businesses. He's buying and rebuilding scrap, having them buy new and let him modify it for their business, etc. And he's designing and building his own stuff on a small scale. He doesn't have a machine shop, but can do a lot on an old Shopsmith. Go figure!

Agreed.

Good points, all.
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ideas in the minds of energetic men of good will.
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wrote:

DONE!
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