moving machines and cargo weight



that's a classic if it's the one posted here some time ago. those look like hi$ wheels/tires, the guy obviously was a lunatic or an rcm'r on a bender. the jogging part is funny, do you suppose?
--Loren
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
V8TR4 wrote:

Most of the F-150s with a standard use a Mazda transmission the 250 and up don't. Thats the weak point in the drive tran and the truck hauling capacity. I have a 1996 extra cab 150 with the 5 speed last week I had about 1500 pounds in the back. Drove fine but I was real easy on my driving. 6 miles is not to far. Mine has the 300 CI six not the V-6. Great truck drives nice runs great but won't take the weight like my past 3/4 ton.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

way
My 2001 GMC 2500HD is a nominal 3/4 ton truck (based on the 2500 series number), however the GMC manual says that you may haul 4006 pounds in it. Fuel weight and passenger weight must be included in the 4006 lbs. If I loaded five 200 pounders in the cab (extended cab) and had the tank full I could still load 2798 pounds in the bed. I think I'd tell the boys in the back seat to use another car and give myself a little leeway, though.
Harold
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

one
Start with the nameplate GWV ...
Tires are stamped with the load limit, for a 1/2 ton PU probably around 2000 lbs per tire. Inflate to the rated pressure.
Shortbed means the load is mostly centered over the rear axle so take about 40% of the truck empty weight from the tire rating and assume the payload is entirely supported by the rear axle. That is a second sanity check on the payload.
My 1/2 ton Chev 4WD weighed 4400 lbs with me and 2 full tanks of gas. Tire rating was 2000 lbs so I figured around 2000 lbs in the bed was safe for fairly casual highway driving. I hauled way over that many times, never going over 50 mph. In the case of a yard of gravel (~ 4000 lbs) 30 mph slowing to a crawl for every bump and pothole.
My 3/4 ton F250 4WD weighs 6600 lbs with me and 2 full tanks. The tire rating is 3000 lbs ea so I figure 3000 to 3500 lbs for safe highway driving and I haven't gone far over that for local hauling. Heaviest "known" load was a full pallet of concrete pavers at 3400 lbs centered over the rear axle.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
V8TR4 wrote:

Sheesh - just make 5 trips. How long can it take to drive 6 miles? Certainly not worth the risk or the expense of renting the trailer. My $.02 Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
if you're not sure if you can do it safely, don't
for short hops across town, I have carried over 2000lbs in my 88 gmc 1500 2wd, with passenger car tires.
I wouldn't blink at 1400 lbs for a 6 mile trip at low speed.
Ok, curiosity got the best of me.
The State of Pennsylvania says my "registered gross weight" is 5000lb
Subtract the 4400 the truck weighs with me and fuel, that leaves 600lbs.
Whatever.
the door sticker is no longer legible, so I dug out my factory service manual.
It tells me that according to my VIN#, the GVWR is 5001-6000lbs
If I am to believe the VIN code, I am good for between 600 and 1600 lbs cargo.

one
way
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 18 Dec 2003 20:41:11 GMT, "V8TR4"
depths:

I have standard car tires on my F-150 shortbed and carried far too much weight (probably 1200-1600 lbs) in compost home twice. The first time I hadn't ensured that the tires were up to 35psi and the truck swayed a lot; it was scary as hell on the freeway back home.
If it were me, I'd probably chance 2 mills at a time, but not 3. If you have nice 6-ply truck tires you'll have a straighter drive. Mine are 225R70-15 4-ply steel radials.
If you want, I'll come pick up that straggler. Dunno when it'll get to your shop, though. ;)

I've seen a couple tons on a pickup. I used to live in SoCal where entire [insert ethnicity of choice here] families moved at once. It's doable, but not very safe.
========================================================= Save the + http://www.diversify.com Endangered SKEETS! + Web Application Programming =========================================================
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
V8TR4 wrote:

5 on a trailer would be 3,500 plus another 1000 or 2000 for the U-haul trailer. Clearly too much.
3 in the bed would be 2,100 lb with much of the weight towards the rear of the bed. Too much.
Check your GVW - empty weight load rating, like others have advised and see if it's close to 1,400 lb. You can probably handle 1,400 lb. Put the mill drills as far forward as you can and raise your tire pressures to the max listed on the sidewalls. Shouldn't be a problem for short trips as long as you don't bottom out the rear suspension and I doubt that you will.
5 is a good number, move one the first trip and see how it goes. If it feels like you have a lot of reserve capacity, move two the following trips.
Do you have a good way to get them out when you get to your destination? I unloaded my Mill/Drill using a ramp and almost dropped it. Gravity is a bitch.
Dick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Haven't seen anyone bring up the problem of brakes . Overloaded and trying to stop will blow your mind. You ever hear of brake fade. The last time it happened to me I had brakes for about 1 second and then nothing.
Don't overload it isn't worth it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lots of good advice. I have one more suggestion. Rather than renting a U-haul, find your local broad selection truck rental place. (Del's in woodinville WA, for example) They will rent you trucks of a sort I at least have never seen at U-haul.
Last Sunday I rented a 16ft box cube truck with a full-on rail-lift-gate. The gate was rated at 3500#. For moving drill-presses, band saws, and the like, this is an enourmous advantage. Note that even a slight incline makes moving things upslope and downslope inside the truck a big hassle, so you still have to be careful with that.
And, er, why would you want 5 mill-drills? A little more variety in your machine diet might be a good thing...
bmw
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (BCEONL) wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
WOW! thanks for everyones input,
I was initially wondering if I should call this OT, but figured I am moving machines. Now I realise that this is a very RCM type of topic :)
Turns out my truck is rated at 2080 lbs payload capacity but after careful consideration I opted to rent a 14' truck from UHaul. I am paying 19.95 for the day with 79 cents a mile, since it is only going to be about 15 miles round trip the total cost will be around $35. This gets me a loading ramp, enclosed cargo area and the ability to do it in one trip. I am still wondering if it was the best way to go, but I am certain is the safest way.
I have a cherry picker and a hydraulic elevating table as well as plenty of dollies to help with unloading. I suspect I will use a standard moving dolly and wheel them down the supplied uhaul ramp. I hope it can support 700lbs.
Another benefit is I will go ahead and use it to move my shear and worktables to my new shop which is 1 mile from my home. My wife is also seeing how maybe I do need to buy a 5 ton flatbed truck :)
Thank you for all your advice,
Oliver
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't buy the flatbed unless you can pay for commercial truck insurance. Been there, done that. Heavy trailers are a way better way to go. - GWE
V8TR4 wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I second that. I put a 10' box on a new Dodge diesel cab & chassis, then spent three days finding someone to insure it as a tow vehicle for our travel trailer. No problem at all getting insurance if you don't mind spending $3,000 a year for something you drive perhaps three thousand miles per year. We finally found insurance reasonably, but I got close to selling the truck before we did. Regardless of your intended use, the insurance industry wants to group you with the big boys when you use big boy trucks.
Harold
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snip----

of
dolly
My honest opinion is the ramp holding is the least of your worries. Have you ever tried to hold back that much weight on a hand truck or any type wheeled device? Gravity becomes the enemy in a hurry. If you intend to go down any kind of incline, I'd strongly suggest you do it with some type of mechanical device to keep control. Getting to the bottom won't be difficult, but doing it under controlled conditions, by hand, is likely to be the surprise of your life. I think I'd recommend the use of a come-along to let it down slowly.
Harold
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
V8TR4 wrote:

At 6 miles, the transporting is not really the challenge - you could make 5 trips if you had to. The real challenge is the loading and unloading. The vehicle bed _height_ is the most important factor here. If you could use a small trailer with a bed say 16" high it would be a _lot_ easier than truck bed 42"(?) high. Vehicle trailers are pretty low to the ground.

Whoa - 700lbs (plus your weight) on a, what, 10' aluminum ramp?! I dunno - it could be expensive if you break the ramp and dump the machine and break a leg or two!
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I recently moved three full size Equipto modular cabinet from Gary Indiana to Metro Detroit in a F150. These items are around 600 lbs each. I estimate I had close to 1800 lbs in the back of that truck and it handled it very well. My biggest concern wasn't the truck, it was the tires. As I started out under load I stopped on occastion to monitor tire temperature. Tires and truck pulled through like a champ.
Unless you modified your tires from OEM, there is next to no chance you will rub the tires on your fenders. It was mentioned here, I don't know where that information came from, but these trucks are not designed that way. Even with no jounce bumpers, you should have tire clearance.
Nobody has mentioned it yet but it is also very critical is where the weight is placed in the bed. You can definitely move two mill/drills at once. Keep the weight as close to the cab as possible to distribute the weight as evenly on all four wheels. The biggest concern is too much weight behind the rear axle. This will unload the front axle putting that extra load on the rear axle. It also creates a vehicle that doesn't steer very well if extreme. Also when you stop, this is where the weight will want to go anyway. You can decelerate much faster than you can accelerate.
Since you aren't going very far and can take it easy on surface streets, I say you don't have much to worry about. Plan each step and have a backup plan in case semething doesn't go as planned.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oliver,
You should know all about overloading machinery if I understand your handle to mean you put a V8 in a TR4! Is it a Rover V8 or did you put a big American iron thing in there? I had a TR4 and while it was a neat car, it was incredibly flexible. It would be pretty scary with more weight and a lot of power. What diff and gearbox did you use?
Keep in mind, I'm not casting aspersions on your sanity. My daily driver is a '93 Volvo 940 wagon with a 400HP Ford 347 and Tremec.
BTW, I agree with the folks that said that you're more likely to overload your tires and rear end then anything else. I'd go one at a time or rent a trailer.
Regards,
Peter

one
way
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
63 TR4, 63 Buick 3.5 liter HO rated for 215hp 215CI. Same basic engine as Rover. The aluminum V8 weighs 40lbs less then the stock 4 banger. She is still a work in progress and I been thinking of trying a turbo Mazda or a turbo ford 2.3 liter later after I play with this some.
Rear end is a live axle and I am working on a disc rear with a spicer pumpkin. Transmission is a Saginaw 4 speed, but am going to swap out for a 5 or 6spd.
The car has become a test bed for ideas, used to just be my sports car for tooling around town. Your brick (Volvo wagon) sounds very cool. I love station wagons and have looked at some of the conversions done on Volvos. I have always liked the Volvo 1800 sport wagon, that would be sweet with a updated engine.

you
They
am
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Clearly the aluminum Buick/Rover V8 is the one to install if you want the V8 sound and some more power. The only problem with them in the States is getting performance or even decent rebuild parts. A turbo motor could make the car very fast, but then you've got the flexy chassis to consider. If you stick with the V8 and put a surrey top on it, you'll have a Stag for cheap. Wait... you can already buy a Stag for cheap. BTW, I gained only 140 pounds from my conversion from NA four cylinder and autobox to alum head V8 and 5 speed. The car has 53.5% on the front wheels.

5
The T5 is the lightest 5 speed out there, shifts great and would be plenty stout for your application.

I
There are a fair number of V8 Volvos out there, most using the Converse kit (which I didn't use). A Volvo is well suited for the conversion because the engine bay is large and the rear end is stout. I too like the 1800 ES, but the engine bay is much smaller. I have a hankering for a 544 with a high HP late model Volvo turbo motor in it; fat tires, big brakes, etc...
Regards,
Peter
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hey there are a lot of buick 215 aftermarket suppliers on the net, just google. I am commiting heresey by putting one in my mercedes 250SL. The original engine is an overcomplicated low-output POS.
dean s

as
a
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.