No spark (distributor question)

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How much oil are you burning?
Black fried gunk sounds like burning oil to me but we all have different ways to describe things eh?
Reply to
Leon Fisk
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Running rich most likely (float too high?) or possibly pumping oil. Try a warmer plug. Champion F16 or even D21 instead of the original
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Running rich and burning oil give different exhaust smells. Oil smells like -- burnt oil, a rich mixture smells like solvents, applying the choke gives you an example. You can briefly hold your hand in the exhaust and then sniff it. A modern car exhaust is the standard for proper combustion.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Thanks Jim. So if my exhaust smells the same as when I leave the choke on, then maybe it's a carb problem? (I'm resisting the urge to make some fart joke.)
George H.
Reply to
ggherold
Oil smoke is blue - rich fuel smoke is black. Check the exhaust - if its "dry" and black it's running rich. If it's gooey it's oil. If it's burning oil switch to a heavier oil (I'd run 15w40 or 20W50) and I'd also try putting some Marvel Mystery Oil in the oil for an hour or two before draining the oil - It's pretty darn good at freeing uup stuck piston rings which WILL make the engine burn oil. How many hours are on the little TO20 and has it ever been rebuilt? How has it been maintained? The Continental z120 is a pretty tough little engine but it's been around a LONG time!!!
Reply to
Clare Snyder
I do love this old tractor. I had the head rebuilt a few years ago. With any luck she'll out live me. :^)
George H.
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Thanks for the TO20 recommendation. I used my machine shop to build a hydraulic front end loader attachment for my 18HP garden tractor to clear snow, for which it worked quite well, however the tractor isn't heavy or strong enough to more than scratch at our rocky New England soil.
I'm looking at small Kubotas but would consider anything for which I can still get parts that I can't make. For instance although I machined a new steering sector gear and linkage for it I can't harden and temper such parts very well in my wood stove.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
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Found a nice service manual here (~55mb):
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=== Per that manual you should have a "Delco-Remy Model No. 1111722 with crankshaft rotation advance of 26 and 24 degrees respectively, both models are fully automatic..
The centrifugal advance mechanism is in- corporated in the distributor to automatically vary the timing of the spark with respect to the position of the piston in the cylinder. At high speeds, the spark must occur at the plug earlier in the compression stroke In order for the fuel mixture to deliver full power. The advance mechanism consists of an ad- vance cam, breaker cam, a pair of ' advance weights, springs and a weight base that is In- tegral with the distributor shaft.
At low speeds, the advance weights are held in to- ward the center by the spring tension. As the speed of the distributor shaft increases, the centrifugal force overcomes the spring tension and the weights move outward and the toggles on the weights engage the advance cam. This rotates the advance cam and break- er cam which in turn allows the breaker cam to open and close the contact points earlier, thus advancing the spark... ===
Maybe help you out some ;-)
Reply to
Leon Fisk
I really suspect it is oil. Interesting to know what oil is being run and when it was last changed. Like I noted before I'd be putting some MMO in the oil and running it for a few hours, then drain the oil and refill with 15w40 all fleet (like rotella T) or 20W50 Castrol GTX or similar and see what happens. Quite possible the valve guide seals are poor but he DID say he had the head rebuilt recently so more likely the rings. The rings tend to sludge up and stick - and the MMO (Marvel Mystery Oil) or Shaler Rislone can loosen the rings. I used to use Rislone years back but MMO is a lot less harsh and just as effective.
Reply to
Clare Snyder
Oh I'm not sure it's a recommendation. It's just what I stumbled upon. And yes it's very nice that the local Massey-Ferguson dealer still has parts for it. (And knowledgeable guys behind the counter.) Old tractors are nice 'cause they use to let a model run for several years... and there were lots of them made.
Bad things, it has no (external) hydraulics, and the pto/ hydraulic pump share the pto power... so you have to engage the pto to raise the 3-pt hitch. The lift(3-pt hitch) only has raise and lower positions... but I added this gizmo that does some feedback and allows for intermediate heights.
The brakes* are kinda wimpy... but maybe this is typical of tractors?
It's got a six speed transmission. (I've never had it in 5th 'road' gear.) Which I hear is preferred to the four speed Ford 9-N, but I've never driven a 9-N so don't know.
George H.
*
I only fixed the brakes a few years ago... who needs brakes? My son wanted to drive the tractor for "take your tractor to school day" But it was a rainy crappy day and didn't happen.
Reply to
ggherold
Thanks! I've got that manual.. but it cost me ~$20. So these cams and springs are down inside the distro somewhere. (maybe I'll give it a look see... now I've had it apart once. :^)
George H.
Reply to
ggherold
I changed the oil and filter last year... I filled it with cheap 10W-30. OK when I change the oil again... a few years, I'll try some of your magic oil. (Well maybe... maybe it's better to leave sleeping dogs lie?)
Thanks for all the nice 'tractor talk'. My neighbor down the road had a Ferggie too, but he passed away few years ago and everyone else around here has newer fancier tractors.
George H.
Reply to
ggherold

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