No spark (distributor question)

wrote:


I really suspect it is oil. Interesting to know what oil is being run and when it was last changed. Like I noted before I'd be putting some MMO in the oil and running it for a few hours, then drain the oil and refill with 15w40 all fleet (like rotella T) or 20W50 Castrol GTX or similar and see what happens. Quite possible the valve guide seals are poor but he DID say he had the head rebuilt recently so more likely the rings. The rings tend to sludge up and stick - and the MMO (Marvel Mystery Oil) or Shaler Rislone can loosen the rings. I used to use Rislone years back but MMO is a lot less harsh and just as effective.
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On Wednesday, April 29, 2020 at 12:00:51 PM UTC-4, Clare wrote:

I changed the oil and filter last year... I filled it with cheap 10W-30. OK when I change the oil again... a few years, I'll try some of your magic oil. (Well maybe... maybe it's better to leave sleeping dogs lie?)
Thanks for all the nice 'tractor talk'. My neighbor down the road had a Ferggie too, but he passed away few years ago and everyone else around here has newer fancier tractors.
George H.
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On Wed, 29 Apr 2020 09:26:59 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Personally I wouldn't use 10W30 in that tractor, and with the little use you give it I'd change it every spring. I've never had MMO cause a problem in an engine - and I've used a lot of it over the last 50 years. I'd run Rotella T3 or T4 15W40 or Valvoline 15W40 all fleet premium or E900. That engine wants the ZDDP levels up around 1000 or more. You won't get that in any current 10W30 or any current "automotive" oil less than 20W50. The crancase ventilation is sub-par so moisture build-up and sludging can be an issue if you don't change it often and only use it sporadically for short jobs.
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On Wednesday, April 29, 2020 at 9:21:22 AM UTC-4, Leon Fisk wrote:

Thanks! I've got that manual.. but it cost me ~$20. So these cams and springs are down inside the distro somewhere. (maybe I'll give it a look see... now I've had it apart once. :^)
George H.
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On Wed, 29 Apr 2020 09:16:37 -0700 (PDT) snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
<snip>

Oh bummer... though the electronic one can be searched (watch for spelling errors). I've found that a big help at times when looking for some things...

If you really weren't seeing the timing advance any when you had a timing light on it while revved up... You should sort that out :)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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wrote:

I think it hits max advance at about 2000 RPM -
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"Leon Fisk" wrote in message wrote:
<Huge snip>

Found a nice service manual here (~55mb):
http://www.ntractorclub.com/manuals/tractors/Ferguson%20TE20,TO20,TO30%20Service%20Manual.pdf
==Per that manual you should have a "Delco-Remy Model No. 1111722 with crankshaft rotation advance of 26 and 24 degrees respectively, both models are fully automatic..
The centrifugal advance mechanism is in- corporated in the distributor to automatically vary the timing of the spark with respect to the position of the piston in the cylinder. At high speeds, the spark must occur at the plug earlier in the compression stroke In order for the fuel mixture to deliver full power. The advance mechanism consists of an ad- vance cam, breaker cam, a pair of ' advance weights, springs and a weight base that is In- tegral with the distributor shaft.
At low speeds, the advance weights are held in to- ward the center by the spring tension. As the speed of the distributor shaft increases, the centrifugal force overcomes the spring tension and the weights move outward and the toggles on the weights engage the advance cam. This rotates the advance cam and break- er cam which in turn allows the breaker cam to open and close the contact points earlier, thus advancing the spark... =Maybe help you out some ;-)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI
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On Wednesday, April 29, 2020 at 1:17:09 PM UTC-4, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Hmm OK I don't know how the advancement works. A rainy day here and I'll take the distributor apart and look inside. The rotor seems locked to the shaft/ gear that goes into the engine block. But according to the service manual I should be able to advance the rotor a little by hand and have it spring back... The rotor doesn't move... except with the engine.
More later. George H.

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On 30/04/2020 17:11, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Likely the lubricant between the 2 part has congealed or it has rusted. You'll need to dismantle it and clean it up, re-lube and put it back together. I posted the same on the 28th but I guess you didn't see it.

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"David Billington" wrote in message wrote:

Likely the lubricant between the 2 part has congealed or it has rusted. You'll need to dismantle it and clean it up, re-lube and put it back together. I posted the same on the 28th but I guess you didn't see it.
=====================================What he said. Set the engine to a definite position like #1 TDC and note the rotor and distributor's position when its gear disengages. Take some pix before you disassemble the advance unless the manual shows reassembly clearly.
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On Thursday, April 30, 2020 at 12:35:01 PM UTC-4, David Billington wrote:

Right. Sorry. I read stuff. (Even in the service manual.) And it makes no sense to me. I move on in the hope that it will make sense in the future.
Anyway taking off the cover it was indeed rusted underneath. I scrubbed with toothbrush and kerosene and it's now getting a kerosene soak for the night.
George H.

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Right. Sorry. I read stuff. (Even in the service manual.) And it makes no sense to me. I move on in the hope that it will make sense in the future.
===========================https://nobelcoaching.com/visual-or-verbal-learner/ "It is more effective for everyone to absorb information when it is presented both visually and verbally, but what if the lectures consist of speech only?"
Which is the problem we face when writing explanations in text-only r.c.m.
I'm by nature a visual learner and have difficulty reducing multidimensional concepts to linear text, so I practice here. Scientists and engineers explain things to each other by sketching and are nearly helpless when they can't.
At a Mensa meeting the speaker dropped into a boring monotone and then suddenly said ELEPHANT, and asked us what immediately came to mind. Everyone but me reported either the word or an image. I was the only one who saw both, a captioned color picture of an elephant pulling down a tree branch.
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On Friday, May 1, 2020 at 8:15:11 AM UTC-4, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Yeah I'm totally a visual learner*. A exploded view of all my tractor parts.. (or just the distributor (D)) would be a wonderful thing. After soaking over night I put some vise grips on the D's rotating shaft and got it to give a bit.. but it's tight. I found this oil plug felt, top center of shaft and maybe I can blow some air down in there?
George H. *words are slippery things, they slip and flip around on the way from my brain to my voice, and from my ears / eyes to my brain.
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Hmm OK I don't know how the advancement works.
=========================Advancement works in strange ways. I had to install a 2 line phone in a senior NCO's office before they would submit my promotion to sergeant. The standard joke is about having to get down on your knees, and I really did to connect the wires.
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On Mon, 27 Apr 2020 07:54:10 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

George, do the tuneup with points and condenser, and put in new plugs. Now that it's running correctly, check the plugs at 5 hours and see if there is still black fried gunk on 'em. That could indicate oil burning. Black soot is a rich carb condition. Go from there.
--
There is nothing more frightening than ignorance in action.

--Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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On Sunday, April 26, 2020 at 5:04:28 PM UTC-4, Clare wrote:

OK Thanks. I'll look into the carb. then. I'm mostly an idiot when it comes to engines. (I guess I should go talk to the guys at the tractor repair/ sales place... well after this virus thing clears up.)
George H.
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On Sun, 26 Apr 2020 11:23:47 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Spark plugs are made in what is called "heat ranges". Read https://www.gsparkplug.com/shop/spark-plug-heat-range/
--
cheers,

John B.
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On 26/04/2020 19:23, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If it's like the Lucas distributors I'm familiar with then the advance unit can seize on the central spindle normally through lack of oiling the centre shaft. Usually easy to dismantle, clean out any congealed lubricant, oil and re-assemble and you should have functional advance.
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On Tue, 21 Apr 2020 09:44:15 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

No timing light required. a test light is helpful to static time but I've done it for decades just watching for the spark. When the points open, you get spark. If you can't see or hear the spark and don't have a test light just grab the coil wire.
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On Tuesday, April 21, 2020 at 2:38:04 PM UTC-5, Clare wrote:

But put the screwdriver down first.
On Tuesday, April 21, 2020 at 2:38:04 PM UTC-5, Clare wrote:

Put the screwdriver down first.
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