Old Bullet Disposal?


Discharge into
( ) Democrats ( ) Republicans
Pick one!
Jim
================================================= please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com =================================================
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What about the guy looking to fill in his old swimming pool ...
Two birds with one ... etc.
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wrote:

Write in Candidate Enemies of the Constitution
Gunner
" ..The world has gone crazy. Guess I'm showing my age... I think it dates from when we started looking at virtues as funny. It's embarrassing to speak of honor, integrity, bravery, patriotism, 'doing the right thing', charity, fairness. You have Seinfeld making cowardice an acceptable choice; our politicians changing positions of honor with every poll; we laugh at servicemen and patriotic fervor; we accept corruption in our police and bias in our judges; we kill our children, and wonder why they have no respect for Life. We deny children their childhood and innocence- and then we denigrate being a Man, as opposed to a 'person'. We *assume* that anyone with a weapon will use it against his fellowman- if only he has the chance. Nah; in our agitation to keep the State out of the church business, we've destroyed our value system and replaced it with *nothing*. Turns my stomach- " Chas , rec.knives
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On Sat, 13 Dec 2003 10:53:45 -0500, Mike Patterson

Highly unlikely that the proper circumstances will occur to make a single round pop. And as the pop will occur inside a steel container, it will be harmless.
I dropped a live 9vt battery once, into the same pocket of a nearly new down filled parka, that contained two .22lr rounds. An hour later, there was a muffled FOOP! and a small cloud of feathers erupted from the front of my parka.. I felt a Thump against my side but not any pain. Examination showed what had happened. Was I lucky I didnt get a bit of brass stuck in my hide? Yup, particulary at contact range.

Have you ever burned any ammunition? When it finally cooks off. the bullet tends to move a couple inches, and the case opens up and may fly up to 3 feet away. The most dangerous part is the primer cap itself..and it may fly up to 20 feet, though generally it stays with the case. Even fire departments dont worry much about burning ammo.
In fact...the standard method of destroying large quanties of captured or obsolete ammunition is via burning.

Good for you. Caution is always a good thing.
Gunner

"Guns aren't toys. They're for family protection, hunting dangerous or delicious animals, and keeping the King of England out of your face."
-- Krusty the Clown, "The Simpsons"
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Ehhh... Having just recently been through a fire, I can tell you you're wrong on that score. They could care less about shotgun shells (paper or plastic) but brass scares the hell out of them. As one of the firemen who tracked me down specifically to ask me if there was any ammunition in the house said, "We don't care about shotgun shells - they lay there and either fizz, or go up in a flash of smoke and light, leaving nothing but a pile of shot or the slug, and some scorched paper or melted plastic. But brass scares the living shit out of most of us - true, there's no telling which way the bullet might go when the round cooks off, but that's not the main worry - the bullet itself doesn't usually go much of anywhere unless it's in the chamber of a gun. The brass case, on the other hand, tends to take off like a rocket, and often has jagged razor edges that can rip a man up real bad before he even realizes that anything has happened."
From what he was telling me, it's all about that "equal and opposite reaction" thing... The bullet weighs enough that it more or less just lays there when the round cooks off. The case is a different story- It basically becomes a small rocket engine, frequently one with blown-out edges that can dice you up in a heartbeat if you're in the way.
--
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I believe this. As kids growing up on the farm, we would stick the bullet of a .22 in the ground and back off and shoot it with a bb gun. The brass would go zinging away. Luckily, no one was ever hit.
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On Sun, 14 Dec 2003 05:47:05 GMT, andy asberry

"Sporting Ammunition and the Firefighter, a video produced by the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers' Institute, analyzes the characteristics associated with small arms ammunition when it is subjected to severe impact and fire. When a primer ignites, it causes the propellant to burn, which creates gases which, when under pressure in a firearm, send the bullet down the barrel. Pressure created by the propellant being burned is what discharges a bullet. As such, loose ammunition in a fire does not result in bullets being discharged because the propellant is not burning under pressure. The video, which has been widely circulated to fire departments, concludes that while ammunition produces a popping sound when it burns, there is no mass detonation of the ammunition, any projectiles are of low velocity, and there is no threat to firefighters in their standard turn-out gear."
I have burned literally tons of small arms ammunition in my time, and yes, there is a bit of brass tossed out of the fire, but its of rather low velocity. Yep..it might stick in your skin. But I can do the same with a brand new playing card or razor blades, by spinning them at you. Will I stand over a fire pit with burning center fire ammo in it? Hell no. Will I stand within 20 feet of such? Yup. Btdt.
The greatest ammunition danger to firefighters for example, is when a house is burning and there are loaded revolvers or other firearms involved in the fire. When the ammo finally cooks off, it fires from the barrel or cylinder as it would if the trigger was pulled. A round in the barrel fires the bullet with the same energy as normal, and rounds in the cylinder fire from each of the chambers, the one lined up with the barrel, will have significantly more velocity than those cooking off from the non aligned chambers and the one at the bottom lined up with the frame tends to blow the handgun apart, particularly as the weapon is now very hot.
The OP indicated disposing of " a few cartridges" of indeterminate types. I rather doubt that we are discussing 50BMG, or HE or Incendiary rounds.
Small arms ammunition are not WMD, nor are they inherently dangerous. Its a rather safe and proven technology, and disposing of it is not rocket science. Wives tales and emotional fanciful imagination do not change the facts of the matter.
Im rather amused by the poster, whom equated small arms ammunition, with explosives, then went off on a nutroll when I flatly told him differently, in the same fashion he earlier berated me.
Berated me btw..because of his misconceptions and ignorance of the subject. Shrug. Not surprising though, most folks don't know dick about ordnance. But again..I was amused by his vehemence.
Gunner
"Guns aren't toys. They're for family protection, hunting dangerous or delicious animals, and keeping the King of England out of your face."
-- Krusty the Clown, "The Simpsons"
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On Wed, 10 Dec 2003 17:06:41 -0800, "larry g"

Bullets - bit that flies out.
Cartridge - the bit left behind
Primer - Little doohickey that goes in the back of the cartridge to start the whole thing up
Powder - Powdery stuff that lives in the cartridge.
Round - The whole thing.
Only thing that's really going to hurt you here is a primer. A live round will have a primer in the back, and that primer will have a flat top. If there's a pin-shaped dent in it, then it's a fired cartridge.
Primers can be rendered ineffective by squirting them with WD40, so long as you can get to the inside of the cartridge case.
Some cases don't have primers. These are usually .22 rimfires (little tiny things) and the primer lives inside the rim of the cartridge. Treat the cartridge as a primer.
Powder (in cartridge quantities) may be taken out into the garden, spread out into a shallow pile or line and burned. It's a bit sparky (light it with something long, and don't do it on a dry prairie), but it won't explode.
A live round is tricky. Needs to be opened up and emptied before you can get to that primer. You might like to hand these over to someone else instead. I'd expect discarded rounds to be fired rather than unfired, as it's damned sloppy work to leave unfired rounds rolling about.
Bullets and cartridge cases with fired or no primers are inert scrap metal. lead, propellant and primer residues are a bit toxic though, so wash your hands.
Anything over 1/2" diameter is worrying. Have someone knowledgeable look at it. Anything that claims to be a "flare" is really hazardous close up, even the tiny ones.
Any range or gunshop should happily dispose of this sort of item.
YMMV - If you're really worried, then ask someone who can actually see these things.
To be honest (as has been demonstrated in many reputable experiments) even _burning_ live small arms ammunition is of fairly low hazard. The stuff just isn't that scary, until it's loaded into a chamber to confine it.
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Andy Dingley wrote:
<SNIP>

<SNIP>
The if the OP decides to go this route, he may want investigate look into the WD40 <-> Primer a little further. Searching rec.guns for "WD40 primers" will turn up some interesting threads. IIRC, one poster immersed some primers in WD40 for several weeks and found that they still worked afterward.
R, Tom Q.
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For single cartriges, the easiest way is to pull the bullet by pushing the bullet sideways to the casing and it will quickly loosen in the brass. Then you can easily pull the bullet out of the case with your fingers and dump the powder out. The powder makes a nice little flash when burned with a match in the free air. I've used this method with cartrigers from .22cal. shorts to .50cal. MG rounds. Do the whole job with your fingers so that there is no banging of the cartrige to make the primer go off. The bending of the bullet sideways expands the joint between the bullet and the casing.
-- Bob May Losing weight is easy! If you ever want to lose weight, eat and drink less. Works evevery time it is tried!
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Then
sideways
Or hold the bullet in a vise and pull the case away with pliers. No need to burn the powder, just toss onto grass. It's fertilizer.
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Ah...only if the doer knows the difference between a rim fire and a center fire cartridge. If its a rim fire..someone may loose an eye.
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
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larry g wrote:

the local police or sheriff's office will take them and dispose of them when the in my area(cut up old guns and dispose of it in the middle of the Mississippi River as per local law with confiscated/junk weapons....
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Lets go diving!
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^^^^^^

...And welding...
Tim
-- "That's for the courts to decide." - Homer Simpson Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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Gentle men; Thank you for all the information. I will pull the bullets and dump the powder. I don't think that they are any thing valuable, look to be a couple of 38 rounds and a few rifle rounds that the kids have left around and nothing fits the rifles I have. I did send all of the special gun related tooling to a good friend, but the usps frowns on the mailing of live rounds. I can't return the items to the previous owner because he was suffering from dementia and it would not be the right thing to do. BTW I'm not afraid of these things just a bit ignorant. I just use a gun as another tool to put meat in the freezer and kill the predators that get in the livestock. I don't have to be a gun nut to know how to use one any more that I have to be a computer geek to use this computer system. Thanks again lg no neat sig line
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snipped-for-privacy@proaxis.com says...

Whatever you decide, do *NOT* use an inertial bullet puller on unidentified ammo. While perfectly safe for sporting ammo and almost all military surplus there are some specialty rounds out there that are impact activated. Most of these are in the "heavy weapons" category with a bullet diameter of .5" or more but some have been loaded in infantry calibers. (7mm, 8mm, .30, etc.) They're rare but turn up fairly often at garage and estate sales as well as gun shows.
Later, Joe
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Red tip 7.62x54R comes to mind. Boom.
GTO(John)

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