ON TOPIC: Welded joints are usually stronger than the surrounding material?

Is that typically true? For example... A typical bike fork weld, where the two curved fork pieces meet the head tube. If immense pressure were
put on one of the forks, would the fork tube bend before the weld breaks apart? That is speaking generally, typically.
Thanks.
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Maybe, if the weld beads are sound and thicker than the tubing walls and the heat doesn't anneal away any of the tubing's added heat treatment or cold drawing strength, or leave the area next to the weld brittle. I spent most of a night school welding course welding and destroying samples until my welds could be bent double without cracking.
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On Mon, 30 Dec 2019 18:56:10 -0000 (UTC), John Doe

I've built a few bike frames and yes, the joint between the front fork blades and the crown are strong enough that the blades bend rather than the weld joint breaking.
Traditionally bicycle frames weren't welded together but brazed and that was strong enough to hold too :-)
--
cheers,

John B.
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