Open vs enclosed motor for a belt sander

Just wondering if anyone in the group has any experience with or thoughts on using an open motor for a belt sander. This will be a
home-brew sander, probably belt-driven, so I may be able to protect the motor to some extent, but not completely. Should I anticipate a quick death for an open motor in this application, or could I expect just a slightly shortened life span? Would a TEFC motor be worth the extra bucks?
Thanks. Bert
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If you can keep the vast majority of the dust off the motor, it would likely hold up fine. As near as I can see, the only real problem is the starter switch getting munged up. The rest of the motor is unlikely to suffer much. I'd be interested in hearing how it goes if you use the motor in question.
Harold
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On Sat, 30 Jul 2005 00:14:21 -0700, "Harold and Susan Vordos"

Years ago, when I bought a brand spanking new Craftsman radial arm saw, it quit starting about 2 weeks after purchase. I called Sears and they sent out a service guy with a little plastic disk that covered the starter switch in the motor. Seems that it was a recurring problem with that particular saw that sawdust would fill the switch contacts. Its been working fine now for over 17 yrs.
Gunner
"Considering the events of recent years, the world has a long way to go to regain its credibility and reputation with the US." unknown
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TEFC is worth it in my opinion, but if you're trying to save money, shield the open motor as best as you can, and then blow it out regularly with compressed air. You'll be fine.

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They last longer than you would imagine but a tefc is the way to go long term. Resist using compressed air when you clean, vaccum instead or split the bell and clean with a vacuum and brush. You would be amazed at how much crap you can keep out with just a piece of light flashing bent to be between the swarf and the motor. If you have to buy a motor buy a tefc, other wise use what you scrounge.
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The fines from a belt sander will really clog the works up. It doesn't hurt the motor except for cutting down on the cooling. If you clean it fairly often, no problem. If you don't do your regular maintenance, go with TEFC. If this is a daily useage thing, by all means go TEFC. I used an open housing on my saw for years, worked fine. Got a chance to upgrade to a TEFC with twice the HP, no brainer choice.
Bert wrote:

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Bert wrote:

For sanding wood or for sanding metal? For use with metal you might have to think carefully.
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This will be primarily for metal work. Maybe I should have said belt grinder instead of belt grinder. Don't know if the previous responders assumed metal or wood...

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I assumed metal. My comments still stand.
However, your comment "Maybe I should have said belt grinder instead of belt grinder" is a little strange! <g>
Harold
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Strange? How so? From what I've seen, the terms are more or less interchangeable in the context of metalworking (yes? no?), but I've never heard "belt grinder" used in the context of woodworking, so I figured using the term "belt grinder" would have prevented any ambiguity as to the material being worked.
Bert
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DOH! Now that I have read what I actually wrote instead of what I *thought* I wrote, I see why you thought it a little strange.
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wrote:

Naw, I think you missed it, Bert. Belt grinder versus belt grinder. Aren't they the same thing? Had you intended to say something different?
Not picking on ya'---just having a little fun. I make statements like that all the time. It's nice to see I'm not alone. <g>
Harold
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Bert wrote:

As long as the motor doesn't suck air and is properly shielded from the primary areas that accumulate dust...
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I assume you meant belt SANDER versus belt GRINDER. :) To some of us that dabble on both sides of the shop, sanders are for wood, grinders are for metal. (Even if my little 1"x42" belt sander gets regular use for metal.)
But if you are doing primarily metal, I'd do some extra shielding on any open motor or a strong preference for a TEFC motor. If you are buying a new motor, the TEFC is just not that much more. If youi opt for shielding, the metal dust is quite heavy and does not float like wood dust. You should be able to get by with just a good shield that covers the top, front, and both sides. Back and bottom can be open to ensure good cooling.
Bert wrote:

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My previous post was motivated by a potential chance to get a smoking deal on a new Baldor motor. That has fallen through, so I'll be on the lookout for a good deal on a TEFC. While I'm looking, I thought I'd solicit opinions on the best motor size for general metal working. What I have in mind is a belt-driven shaft with fittings on one end for buffing wheels and wire wheels (maybe 8"?); on the other end of the shaft would be the drive wheel for a belt grinder (probably configured for something in the range of a 2" x 72" belt). I've been thinking a 3/4 to 1 hp motor would be about right. What do you think?

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No smaller, surely. I think my Powermatic 6" x 48" belt sander has a 1 horse motor, and it's none too powerful if you're doing some serious sanding. Given a choice, I'd go as large as is practical.
Harold
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