OT for computer geeks

My computer fried Thursday. The power supply went bonkers and fried the mother board, or that's what my computer guy said.
Bear with me, and explain a couple of things if you know them.
Can I have the old hard drive taken out and put in my new computer (well, a used one I had) and use the computer with the two hard drives? They both have XP.
I'm trying to configure my e mail. I have OE. I have been able to figure out the newsgroups, but can't get the e mail going. My ISP provider has been no help, and is about to be replaced. When we moved in to this rural area, there was only one company that would put up a receiver. Now there are more.
What is the flow chart of an ISP, a server, an e mail account, etc? How about the outgoing sockets on the advanced tab? And POP3, SMTP, NNTP, etc?
Going to get on the phone now and get some answers, but just wanted to know if anyone can give me the short ones.
Steve
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On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 09:38:55 -0800, "Steve B"

Yes. However....only the XP on one or the other may be used. Standard computers can have up to 4 hard drives installed. With some special cards..one can have up to 8 or 12 running on board..but Id be sure there was a seperate powersupply running anything over 4.

You will need to set up your SMTP server first, then your name and password. Then you will need to set up the server they use to send email, if different from the inbound SMTP
This link may help you.
Review it careful several times before changing anything. You can change it again easily, but why not get it right the first time...
http://www.sfsu.edu/~helpdesk/faq/smtp.html

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You can pull the hard drive, install it as either the primary (boot) drive or secondary. Getting it to boot from the old drive 'should' work as long as the systems are fairly similar. Sometimes the Microworst anti theft things cut in and lock you out but it usually works. Secondary drive should work fine with no issues. Quite handy to have the extra storage space.
Some quick definitions An ISP is the one that provides a physical connection to the web. An ISP MAY provide a server or just a port to the world. Your e-mail is on a server (large dedicated fast processor somewhere). Your ISP may give you one, there is gmail and the big guys, a private mail server like my neighbor runs, or other options. The POP, ports and all that are a function of the actual e-mail server that you are trying to access. The settings used to be fairly simple but now they are trying to cut down on the spammers and hackers. Only way to go through that is to get the tech support settings they are requiring. If you are using the ISP mail server, the ISP tech support MUST give you that information if you are going to get anything done.
Steve B wrote:

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On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 09:38:55 -0800, Steve B wrote:

What Gunner and Roy said, but: if your power supply took out your mother board it may well have taken out your hard drive, too -- you'll want to check it. Chances are very low that a broken hard drive will take out a power supply, but nothing is 100% sure with repair work. If you have an old 'trash' computer lying around that you can shove the hard drive into and give it a whirl, that'd be best.

I can't rememmberrrrrrrrr!
From Thunderbird, for my setup, I have: Server Type: POP (this is most common; I've never had an ISP that wanted something different) Server Name: mail.yourISP.com User Name: usually your email address, but sometimes a special login name Port: 110
Somewhere you'll have to put in a password as well.

Always be sensitive to the desires of your vendors, particularly when they're sending out signals that they really don't want you as a customer. If they aren't hopping on this problem for you, it means that they're tired of making money, and they would rather have some peace and quiet. If this is the case, and if those alternative providers look any good, go ahead and change.
--
www.wescottdesign.com

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Steve
Rarely have I found a "fried" computer component when one is presented to me as fried. I do a lot of electronic repair. Perhaps a single component. Do as another suggested by separately triyng each component in another computer. I have been using a computer with nothing but fried components for several years.
Replace your Computer Guy. He is probably trying to simply sell you something(s) because he is too lazy or inept to diagnose the problem. Most computer guys are. I am simply too cheap to do this.
A case in point. My SIL asked me too look at her computer that was "fried". It was simply locked up after a bad hit on the power line. I restarted and rebooted several times and all is well after 5 years.
Bob AZ
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On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 10:11:36 -0800, Bob AZ wrote:

OMG. It took FIVE YEARS of rebooting before all was well?
Wow. Now _that's_ persistence.
:-)
--
www.wescottdesign.com

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wrote:

Steve
Rarely have I found a "fried" computer component when one is presented to me as fried. I do a lot of electronic repair. Perhaps a single component. Do as another suggested by separately triyng each component in another computer. I have been using a computer with nothing but fried components for several years.
Replace your Computer Guy. He is probably trying to simply sell you something(s) because he is too lazy or inept to diagnose the problem. Most computer guys are. I am simply too cheap to do this.
A case in point. My SIL asked me too look at her computer that was "fried". It was simply locked up after a bad hit on the power line. I restarted and rebooted several times and all is well after 5 years.
Bob AZ
reply: I didn't present this as "fried", just that I turned it on, it made a ZAP! noise, a whiff of ozone/melted plastic, and then it wouldn't work.
My computer guy is competent. I've used him for years, and in other situations, he's the kind of guy who says, "You CAN replace this, but it doesn't need it." He has always fixed my stuff, and it has worked, and at times, it was less money than I expected. He makes house calls. I have taken A+ training, and I believe a computer business man knows how to diagnose a power supply or motherboard in a few simple steps. I know most any electricital geek could do it with just a multiprobe.
Steve
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Bob AZ wrote:

I got one! One day I came in to work and a computer there was powered off. I figured there'd been a power outage in the building and tried to power it on, but it wouldn't go. The fans would turn one blade and then back to off. I replaced the power supply, SAME thing! I then found there was a jumper on the MB to turn power on permanently (I guess it disabled the ATX remote power control.) It powered up, then I smelled the "bad smell". The main motherboard system chip now had a burned spot on it!
So, it CAN happen, this was not caused by the power supply, but a failed chip. Now, I HAVE seen some computers "cooked" by a failed power supply fan that let the entire system bake without ventilation for days. Another thing "going around" is the bum capacitor deal. A couple year's supply of electrolytic capacitors used on motherboards were made poorly and failed after 1-3 years of operation. We've had some of those here at work. I repaired one by replacing the caps with ones I got off eBay, there are guys selling capacitor replacement kits for exactly this problem. The first thing I heard about this one was on the NPR business news radio show that Dell was taking something like a $50 million charge against earnings to cover the warranty replacements on these MB's.
Jon
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I live in a semi rural area. Power surges, and lightning strikes can be a major problem. I have seen computers with exploded components from the power supply to the hard drive. In one case only one dim survived, because a dim with more memory took the hit! Path of least resistance I guess. The capacitors in the power supply exploded, chips on the motherboard and drives had pieces of plastic blown out, and there were signs of fire. That was from a lightening strike on nearby power lines.
Steve R.
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wrote:

The only solution for that is several layers of high-powered lightning arrestors on the incoming power line to snub the pulses, starting with getting your local power utility to beef up their arrestor systems.
They get blown up transformers and nuisance-blown fuses too, so it's in their best interest to clamp and dissipate the surges as far from your house as possible. Atr the transmission and distribution voltages, and on the pole at the output of the service transformer feeding your house.
You need to add a beefy whole-house arrestor at the service entrance, and seriously beef up your ground rod to a multiple rod system - if the soil is real bad (low conductivity sand) even a ring of 4/0 bare copper buried all the way around the house with a ground rod every 20'. And start watering the lawn more, get the ground resistance down.
Then you put arrestors on the major electronics devices in the house, in case a pulse gets past the other defenses.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 09:32:13 -0800, Bruce L. Bergman

Just get a good DUAL CONMVERSION UPS and put it on a good Surge protector. Not much gets through a goodPowerware Prestige UPS.
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Wasn't my house, or my computer. :)
Steve R.
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you know, if you want real good isolation from these transients, use an electric motor powering an AC generator - the efficiency is quite good (not perfect, but in the 95% range) and there is complete isolation of your house power from the external AC - particularly if you connect the two with a non-conductive coupler that is a few inches long, and you ground the two separately to separate ground rods, it would take a particularly pernicious lightning strike to jump to the house.
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On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 07:49:36 -0800, "Bill Noble"

You could also build your house inside a giant faraday cage - but nobody would.
I repeat... If you are in a high-lightning area beef up the bonding and grounding, and add a good whole house surge arrestor. Especially if you have already been bitten once.
And get the local utility to beef up their surge arrestors on the power line feding the house. (Because they REALLY don't want you climbing the pole and messing with the 2400/4800/9600V feeder...)
--<< Bruce >>--
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This does work quite well for HV isolation. I have worked on some 100KV ion implanters, that used this method (with a 1 meter lexan shaft) to provide power to the HV terminal equipment.

That is a meaningless effort, there is effectively no such thing as an "isolated" ground rod, and it wouldn't do you any good if there were. The whole POINT of the ground rod is to tie everything to a common equipotential reference.
As well, the NEC (for an Installation in the US) would require you to bond the two rods together anyway.
"All grounding electrodes as described in 250.52(A)(1) through (A)(6) that are present at each building or structure served shall be bonded together to form the grounding electrode system"
and the rod would not (IMO) be considered "supplementary", which would exclude the allowance of Section 250.54

True, BUT, the galvanic isolation is not the only concern. I f the current takes a path through your "motor conductors" you can couple significant amounts of current to parallel conductors via transformer action, if those conductors run parallel to, and close to your house conductors.
Also I have been told that your phone lines are another frequent source of lightning current entry into your house, for locations where lightning is a big problem. {and then from your phone equipment/fax/computer (does anyone still use dialup???) to your power line.
jk
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Sounds like you need a high quality UPS that you run on batteries all the time and the AC keeps them charged. More protection that way and a high quality surge and spike / RF protection.
If you tap off power lines at the end of the line - e.g. like to the house pole that has a transformer for 'end users'. This can be the capture point from the power line feeder lines.
I have 1500' of 2 phase high voltage lines - at the terminal end I have two dummy transformers - they were old ones in the yard - power company deal. My House transformer is 150' from the end and the shop is about in the middle. The transient traverses down the line from the same lines down the highway. It slams into the end and down into a transformer that has a primary only connected. Without a load (can have a transient suppressor instead) the pulses reflect off the high impedance end, doubling in amplitude and return down towards the source. If the house is on the end (a foot is better than not) the house is the sink for all evil on the line. Switch gear (switching transformers adjusting the voltage) and trees....
Martin (I have two on this two computer cluster and wireless server.)
Steve R. wrote:

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You could try moving the hard drive with XP but each installation customizes itself to the hardware it finds and they don't take well to changes afterwards. A similar motherboard from the same maker ought to work. A different hard disk controller might not even allow booting because Plug&Play won't identify it until the operating system has loaded, Catch-22
And then XP checks for radical changes to hinder the cloning of one validated installation onto multiple PCs and it may not activate, or give you a month to obtain a legal license.
You can generally run up to 4 internal drives, one master and one slave on both the primary and secondary IDE cables, assuming the case is large enough and the motherboard has both slots. The BIOS tries to boot from the first drive in its boot sequence. If it can't, it tries the next one in the list, etc.
I don't know about SATA, my PCs are all too old.
My gaming and HDTV desktop has a swappable enclosure containing the bootable hard drive(s) as Master and the DVD drive as Slave on the primary IDE cable and a larger hard drive, IIRC set to Cable Select, for programs and videos on the secondary IDE cable.
The Internet desktop has most programs installed on a larger external USB drive that was originally internal and still contains a non- functioning installation of the operating system.
Open up Administrative Tools > Computer Management > Disk Management and you can examine the drives and partitions.
I can't help you with OE, I use several free web email services, which are easy to access from client's computers without any setup. That's a large part of why I post through Google Groups, too.
jsw
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First I'm a Mac user, and can't help you with 'OE' 'XP' and all the Billyware stuff.
However, after having to change ISP's (and email addresses) 3 times one year, I switched to a Gmail account, and IMAP it to my home machine mail application (Apple's 'Mail'). It can also be POP'ed and SMPT'ed if you like.
Works great! Been using it exclusively since August 05! In this whole time, it's only been down once (that I know of)... and then only for about a half hour.
Gives me the flexibility to easily do mail 'on the road' from any machine connected the internet, the ability to dump ISP's at will without having to change my email address, plus I'm still using a real mail program on my home machine.
I also have any number of PDF manuals, charts, tables and and the like stored up in Gmail that are accessible most anywhere anytime.
Just my .02 worth... If you do choose to use Gmail, use a good password, and be sure to always use the sign out feature if accessing from machines other than your own.
Erik
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On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 09:38:55 -0800, Steve B wrote:

...
...
If the old hard drive is ok (seems likely, but see other posts) and if it's a SATA drive (or if the new computer has PATA as well as SATA connectors, or you add on a PATA adapter), you should be able to install the old drive in the new computer, alongside the new drive. XP should recognize it and assign the next available drive letter, perhaps D:, E:, F: ...
SATA drives (<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SATA ) use a smaller connector (7 pins and wires) and thinner cable than PATA drives (40 pins, 40 or 80 wires). See pictures in above link and in <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallel_ATA .
--
jiw

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Step-by-step instructions (from YOUR ISP) are here:
http://wildblueworld.com/dishmail.net/howdoi-outexpressemail.php
You'll start at step 2 (which is actually configuring outlook express.
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