OT Gooseneck trailer question

I have (among other transportation) my own Chevy 2500HD pick-up truck
and a 12,000 lbs "bumper pull" trailer with a pintle hitch.
While it is a good trailer, it is relatively short and only has room
for a forklift and nothing else. Plus, being a bumper pull trailer, it
has some disadvantages in towing.
I have recently bought a 14,000 lbs gooseneck trailer that is 25 feet
long and want to hear some relevant comments from people experiences
with such trailers.
It is 14,000 lbs rated, but that is only for its axles, and it can
carry more than that if that weight is supported by the truck itself.
My main question is how a Chevy 2500HD can handle it. I am not
expecting miracles of performance. I also always treat heavy loads
very gently and barely step on gas, trying to be nice to the
transmission. I have pulled 11,000+ trailers without much trouble,
just slowly.
Should I expect handling benefits with a GN trailer?
Do you think that the transmission will survive a 14,000 lbs trailer
if I try very hard to go easy on it?
THanks
Reply to
Ignoramus10431
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I can't comment on your tranny, but I've driven roughly similar-sized gooseneck and bumper-tow trailers: goosenecks handle better, ride better on long trips, and seem to be easier on the truck than bumper tow.
Load the trailer and the truck to the limits of what the axles are rated for, drive at highway speeds (but don't pass any cop cars), and stick to your maintenance schedule religiously. You should wring full value out of your truck.
My dad's shop truck outlived my dad. It was a 1972 Chevy C-20 with over 100000 miles on it when we got it. We'd pull out of the shop at 20,000 pounds combined vehicle weight (with a gooseneck) and drive to shows in California, Washington, and the midwest. 20000 pounds combined vehicle weight was a bit much -- after 200000 miles of that the truck frame needed all it's rivets replaced (my dad did not believe in "throw away and buy new") -- but he dropped down to 15000 CVW and the truck lasted basically forever after that.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
What year, engine trans? Does it have the factory tow package as well?
Look on the door sticker and it should give you the GCVW.
However I'm betting that 14K is over the limit. The new 2015 2500HD maxes out at 13K
Reply to
Steve W.
If the rivets needed replacing, so did the holes. Where on Earth did you find a cost-effective source for frame-free rivet holes, Tim?
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I took no part in that madness; it happened after I was off being an engineer instead of the #2 son at a family business. Either he drilled them out and replaced with oversize, he depended on the swell of the rivets to fill the holes, or it wasn't as bad as he thought and he was just wasting time (although the truck was reputed to have driven better after the rebuild).
Reply to
Tim Wescott
Without knowing what year & drivetrain, it's hard to say. But I'd at least add a external transmission cooler and a deep transmission pan. If it needs a pep-up for towing, consider changing rear end gearing.
Jim H.
Reply to
Jim Hornaday
I have a 24,000 lb. rated gooseneck that I pull with an F350 and manual tranny. It is a wonderful piece of equipment. It goes WAY beyond the ability of a tag trailer.
We last hauled a 18,000 lb. mill from central IL to central MN.
Brakes are the biggest issue. I was able to install a brake controller that taps into the brake line. Unfortunately these are no longer made. The units with a pedulum inside (nearly all of them now) are not worth a shit for this application.
Reply to
Karl Townsend
This is very nice. (I saw your message about F-250).
I bet that to be nice on the trans, you just "go easy" when driving and avoid excessive acceleration, and slow down on steep grades.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus32619
The brake controllers that work off the brake light with programmed ramp and max current work better than the pendulum ones - amd I believe there are now some out using solid state decellerometers. TruControl from Hensleys one example
Reply to
clare
What? Oh dammit. I suppose someone did something exceedingly stupid and then won a lawsuit.
Are the pendulum units attached to the truck body, trying to sense the deceleration, or are they attached to the brake pedal, trying to sense the rotation?
In the former case I think you may as well install spoked wheels on the truck and carry a long stick to shove in when you want to stop.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
Its a decelleration sensor. If you are grossly overloaded going down a steep grade. The damn controller won't help you stop at all.
The brake line pressure sensor is by far the best system but I'm sure too many idiots f&*%ked it up when the took the line apart at the master cylinder. A controller named Max Brake was made just for large heavy trailers on small trucks. My truck is 22 years old, don't know what to do when it dies.
My son's diesel F250 comes with an integral brake controller as part of the car's system. Works better than the pendulum unit but stopping distance was easily double of what my truck does with the same load.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Its a decelleration sensor. If you are grossly overloaded going down a steep grade. The damn controller won't help you stop at all.
The brake line pressure sensor is by far the best system but I'm sure too many idiots f&*%ked it up when the took the line apart at the master cylinder. A controller named Max Brake was made just for large heavy trailers on small trucks. My truck is 22 years old, don't know what to do when it dies.
My son's diesel F250 comes with an integral brake controller as part of the car's system. Works better than the pendulum unit but stopping distance was easily double of what my truck does with the same load.
Karl ==========================================================
The deceleration sensor controllers I've had were tunable so you could adjust for the trailer weight, and they all had manual apply slide levers on the front which can come in real handy if swaying sets in. I haven't towed a real heavy load in years, but I could tell the difference when I adjusted the controller with the trailer empty and then with a car on it.
----- Regards, Carl Ijames
Reply to
Carl Ijames

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