OT unsigned title

I bought a semi tractor on auction and received a title, not only
without my name, but also without any signature of the seller (which
is a company, not an individual, closing down a factory). The purchase
is 100% legitimate. When I was at the DMV registering a title for
something else, I observed that they did not check the signature in
any way (obviously).
If I decide to keep this tractor, which I likely would, should I just
have, say, my wife sign it with something, in order to re-register?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus32500
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They probably pay much more attention to the bill of sale, especially because they tax you on the sale price. At least in Missouri, the title is not that important, it is the records in the DMV that are important. Commercial sellers submit backup paperwork to the DMV, and after those documents pass muster, and you pay the sales tax, the state issues a NEW title to you.
I think the title is more important in person-person sales, and then they have to be notarized.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
You should organize the business in whatever way your accountant says is most beneficial to you and in a manner that protects your private assets from the commercial ones.
Once that's done, how to register the vehicle is clear--concomitant w/ the above plan.
Whether you have trouble w/ the lack of signature on transfer will depend in all likelihood on the state/nature of the bill of sale and the nature of local regulation where you are. I can envision it being everything from no issue to a stopper all depending on the totality of the circumstances. Registering it as an individual rather than a business is likely to raise more eyebrows and questions besides the obvious undesirability of same from the liability standpoint previously discussed at length.
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Reply to
dpb
Notarized? That's a new one.
It varies by state. In Oregon if you wait too long to bring the paperwork to DMV you have to pay a fine -- that's to cut down on unlicensed car dealers buying cars with the owner's signature (and, presumably, date) and never transferring the title to themselves.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
...
That's where he's got a problem--until he decides under what entity it _should_ be titled, filling in the blank(s) is indeterminate as to what and who and how any signature should be written--as personal, officer of corporation, whatever.
If he titles it personally, then if something does happen and he hasn't put it in the business he's up a crick w/o a paddle regarding the liability issue; even if doesn't it's going to cost a second time when he does finally decide where it should be to do that...all in all, as noted previously he needs to figure out how it _should_ be first, then that will guide all the rest. The rest after that is simply a detail of jumping through whatever hoops the DMV demands--and only checking there will answer the question, precisely and accurately for his particular situation.
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Reply to
dpb
Ignoramus32500 on Tue, 31 Jan 2012 19:09:37 -0600 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
Only your local Department of Motor Vehicles knows for sure.
>i
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Contact the DMV. NY at least requires the title be signed by either the owner if it's an individual or by an "authorized person" in the event you're buying it from a company. No signature gets you no transfer or registration because only the title is proof of ownership. (unless it's a pre-72 vehicle as they didn't have titles)
Having your wife sign is very likely considered fraud because she is neither an owner or the authorized person. That person would be the one who is actually the employee of the company overseeing the closure.
Reply to
Steve W.
...
It certainly isn't _intended_ to be fraud, agreed, but you _don't_ (yet) own the vehicle outright until the legalities have been completed as required and you have a (clear) title in your possession...
As I and others have pointed out, only by going to DMV and finding out the actual hoops to jump through and then jumping through them (undoubtedly also in the proper order and w/ the corresponding changing hands of sufficient lucre and proof of insurance, etc., etc., etc., ...)
Just go do it--after, of course, determining just _how_ it's to be registered to begin with (to be repetitive :) ). There's no point in posting these kinds of questions here--we can't know all the ins and outs of your particular situation that are pertinent even if somebody does know the precise rules and regulations for the locale.
Reply to
dpb
You don't own it if the title is unsigned by the employee designated by the company to liquidate the assets of the company. They are the ONLY legal signer for that document.
All you have to do is CALL the DMV and they will tell you what has to be done. How damn hard is that.
Reply to
Steve W.
At least in Missouri, and with a commercial dealer as the seller, the title is a worthless piece of fancy paper. What COUNTS is the documents submitted directly by the dealer to the DMV. They will issue a NEW title made out to you after you pay the property taxes on the vehicle and register it. At least, this is what happens in MO when you buy a vehicle for cash.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
Well, that's likely what would happen in IL, too, if it were actually a dealer. This is/was a private sale/auction, though.
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Reply to
dpb
OK, I thought Iggy bought this at some kind of auction. As it is a commercial vehicle, there may be some different rules to title transfer. Anyway, the bill of sale is still likely to be more important. But, the DMV may need some paperwork sent directly from the seller to confirm they intend to transfer the title.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
I will go there on Saturday with the title and the auction invoice to be the "bill of sale". I will post an update.
I am already driving this truck around my building, just to learn its operation. Just driving in 1st speed. I never drove a stick shift vehicle before. It is very different.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus10043
And going uphill and downhill is very different with a manual transmission as well. Add trailers and things get giggly pretty quickly.
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
Go to the Sec o' States office in Melrose Park. It's on Mannheim, just north of North Ave. They are the fastest, most organized and friendliest DMV office I've ever been to.
Damn, I just checked. They are closed on Saturday. Looks like you're stuck with Lombard. They seem to be the only one out there with Sat hours. 7:30 - 12:00.
Paul K. Dickman
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman

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