OT - VERY slow small tire leak

My snow blower (tubeless) tire went flat. Took it off, pumped it up, & did under-water bubble test. Negative; no bubbles. Watched it: went
from 20 psi to 17 over 2 days.
What now? Any better way to check for leak?
Thanks, Bob
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On Sun, 15 May 2016 12:51:08 -0400, Bob Engelhardt wrote:

Just put a tube in it!
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Tim Wescott
Control systems, embedded software and circuit design
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Or the green snot, not sure of the right name, but its for sealing leaks on ATV type tires.
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On Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 12:51:58 PM UTC-4, Bob Engelhardt wrote:

Way back there was a aerospace test for determining if hermetic seals were good. It was called the " Joy " test. At that time Joy dishwater detergent in water produced the best bubbles.
I think that sometimes a tire does not loak if the tire is off the vehicle, but does leak when the tire is supporting a load and in in the right orientation.
I assume you checked the valve stem and checked that the bead did not leak.
Dan
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On Sun, 15 May 2016 10:57:04 -0700 (PDT)

I agree with Dan's comments. Would also add that just the act of checking a small tire with a pressure gauge lowers the pressure. Depending on the size it could be a significant amount. With smaller tires I usually give them another small shot of air after fuddling around checking the pressure and then call it good.
You can try over pressuring it some too, might reveal the leak.
You probably already gave it a good inspection but if not carefully look it over. Small tacks and nails can seal-up quite good but leak during use. I've actually have a couple tires plugged with small rivets. Just can't bring myself to ram a 1/4 inch repair plug into a hole/leak that is the size of needle. And I'm too cheap to buy a specialty repair plug and lazy to dismount the tire ;-)
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On Sunday, May 15, 2016 at 2:45:54 PM UTC-4, Leon Fisk wrote:

Agree. The small tires just don't hold very much air. You're much better of f filling with a tire chuck that has a built-in gauge. I don't think you ca n do an accurate reading of "it lost x psi in y days" with a tire gauge tha t isn't permanently attached to the valve.
That said, the goop that goes in the tire and stays slimy seems like a good way to go in this case.
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On Mon, 16 May 2016 14:02:45 -0700 (PDT)
<snip>

I've avoided using it because of this claim:
"Seals multiple punctures repeatedly up to 2 years."
From:
http://www.slime.com/us/products/auto/sealants/tire-sealant.php
Crap nowadays I blink my eyes and 2 years have passed. The mower I would use it on is 8 years old. My rivet fix has been holding for 7 years... No experience but I've heard horror stories about trying to fix/replace tires that have had slime put in them. It seems to be an expedient fix but bites back another day (shrug).
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wrote:

I had to demount and hose it out from tires I had put it in, since it didn't reach and seal bead leaks. Other than the nuisance of prying the tire off and back on it wasn't hard to remove. --jsw
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On Mon, 16 May 2016 17:39:24 -0400
<snip>

Was that fresh slime that didn't work or 4 plus year old stuff that quit working.
I'm not trying to be a jerk, just wonder about the stuff when it gets old. I helped a neighbor put some in a tire years ago. It wasn't all that bad to cleanup fresh from the bottle...
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wrote:

The tires leaked for several years. I don't remember how long I put up with them between squirting in the Slime and deciding to buy the smaller Harbor Freight tire changer, maybe a few months to a year. I had about a dozen small tires that slowly leaked, and left a small compressor in the shed to reinflate them as necessary.
Once I had the changer I stopped trying to seal them and just installed tubes, the careful way I learned in the Army motor pool.
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On 05/15/2016 11:51 AM, Bob Engelhardt wrote:

dcaseter pointed out the "don't forget the stem and valve" part, what pressure did you use for the test and did you have big-enough tank of _still_ water to be able to fully submerse the whole thing? Be careful, of course, but over-pressure some to give a little extra "oomph" to the leak...
Or, while I hate have the stuff in the tires, use the sealer.
--



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Also be carefull, because a tire may leak a lot more slowly from the rim/bead interface when the pressure is higher.
A tire may loose 1 psi per day at 40psi, and then loose 2psi a day when the pressure drops to 30 PSI, and go flat overnight from 20.
On a tubeless tire a hardened rubber bead combined with a rusted steel rim (in the bead seal area) is a very common cause of air leakage.
Also age hardened and Ozone damaged rubber cam allow air to "ooze" throughthe rubber carcass.
Generally installing a tube in the tire after making sure there is nothing penetrating the tire carcass, and no roughness on the rim, is the best way of sealing a small low-speed tire.
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How long did you watch? In chasing a similar sort of leak it turned out that one millimeter-sized bubble appeared every couple of minutes. It took about half an hour with a stopwatch to be sure the bubbles were from a leak and not just trapped air. The water and tire must be perfectly still, if the timing is regular you can be pretty sure it's worth investigating.

Patience, patience and more patience..... 8-)
bob prohaska
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On Sun, 15 May 2016 12:51:08 -0400, Bob Engelhardt wrote:

My lawnmower front tires were a problem because of all the spiny bumelia and mesquite thorns. Had them filled with urethane foam. Rear tires would be too heavy (and expensive) and tear up the drive train.
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On Mon, 16 May 2016 11:02:29 GMT, Pete Keillor

Who filled them, what was the cost, and what's the product used, please? My problem here is thorns from blackberry bushes.
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On Mon, 16 May 2016 09:40:34 -0700, Larry Jaques wrote:

<snip>

It was an outfit up I-35 that does huge excavator tires, towmotor tires, etc. It's a pretty dense urethane, very heavy, had to leave the wheels a day or two to allow cure time. Cost about $25 per.
Them must be some badass blackberries.
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On Mon, 16 May 2016 19:28:19 GMT
<snip>

Multiflora rose, wild blackberries and autumn olive here. It's the wimpy 2 ply tires that are the problem. We need some 6 ply heavy duty replacements...
They are why I have some little rivets plugging holes in my mower tires. I've got acres of the nasties, too many to exterminate...
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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On Mon, 16 May 2016 16:03:40 -0400, Leon Fisk

Get a magnetrak or some other crawler -
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On Mon, 16 May 2016 16:30:16 -0400 snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
<snip>

Man those look so cool! But way out of my affordability zone. Hell I think they are even more expensive than the Green machines. I had to pick myself off the floor after looking at the price...

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=magnatrac

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Leon Fisk
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On Mon, 16 May 2016 19:28:19 GMT, Pete Keillor

Ouch, but if it ends the problem for good, I guess it's worth it.

They are. I have wounds all over me every time I go anywhere near 'em. And they grow like bamboo here, an inch an hour, I swear...
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