Oxygen

Hi there!
I am just hoping to start working with a propane/oxygen welding/heating torch. I am just wondering if anybody knows of a
supplier of oxygen cylinders for this or similar purposes in the UK. Preferably one that is reasonably priced, however I'm not sure what the going rate for O2 is and whether there are any regulations involved with the purchase, supply and storage of it for home users (i.e my home is not registered as a business). Thanks,
Samantha
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How about faking ashma and getting socialized medicine to deliver breathing oxygen for free. Works fine in a torch.
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On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 17:33:42 GMT, Samantha BeanHead

Try inquiry to John Stevenson at : snipped-for-privacy@stevenson-engineers.co.uk
You didn't say where you are, John is near Nottingham.
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In the UK there are 2 main suppliers for these products. BOC and Air Products. I don't know the specifics/legalities of supplying O2 for home us, but if you contact your local branch off the above companies, they'll soon tell you.
moray
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I have had oxygen from BOC for about 20 years and asked the same questions you have at the beginning. I was told they were no issues with home use and storage and have not been aware of changes in the mean time. The local supplier knows my situation and nothing has been mentioned. It is best if you ask say BOC for the safe storage and use information before you sign up so you are aware of safe best practice regarding storage and use of compressed gas. You can find them online. The standard O2 pressure for the bottles I use is 230bar (3336 psi) so it deserves respect. Air products are also suppliers and I have heard Distillers mentioned as a supplier of compressed gases but have never followed it up. Point to note is that BOC have a surcharge of 8.50 + VAT IIRC when you collect upto 6 bottles, this is additional to the gas cost.
What are you actually doing, jewellry, bead making, metal work?. You might be able to use a torch that electrolyses water using mains electricity and then burns the resulting hydrogen and oxygen. Might be expensive if you are not using it alot but might be worth a look. I have only seen one once in use by a jeweller. Could you use a propane/ compressed air torch?.
Samantha BeanHead wrote:

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Thanks for taking the time to respond to my message, I am in fact primarily hoping to work with glass (I am interested in scientific glass blowing) and I know thats not directly related to this newsgroup but I thought that I could get some info about welding type equipment. I guess I was really trying to get an idea of the prices and services available in the UK for a very small (minimal/learner?) scale user. I suppose I was hoping to save some time by trying to get the general jist of things before I started throwing my money around. :)
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Depending on your location or willingness to travel a friend did a boro course at Westminster college IIRC in London. He loved it. I currently just stick to glassblowing with soda or lead glass. I do courses or hire a bench at www.liquidglasscentre.co.uk but am working on building my own equipent for home use. I suppose with the OA kit I could do boro work if I got the glass and the glasses.
Samantha BeanHead wrote:

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When I was doing glassblowing for chem lab in college, we just used regular air-natural gas burners for Pyrex with no problems. I don't remember seeing any oxygen tanks around the glass shop either, the department had a first-class shop that handled work from states all around. Had several big Litton glass lathes in there.
Why not see if you can find a shop at a local college or university and see what they use. Another source would be a neon sign maker's operation. It might give you a better idea of what you need to start with.
Stan
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Samantha
Only place you need oxygen for glass blowing is if you want to work in quartz. Then you need a hydrogen / oxygen flame to get it hot enough to flow (just barely - it's like working taffy). For borosilcate (Pyrex) all you need is natural gas and compressed air. There's a good book called "Scientific Glassblowing" which walked you through almost everything and did a good job of explaining what was going on. Probably out of print, but your local library may have it. Biggest expense will be the burner, which will be several hundred dollars new.
One trick I learned from an old glassblower is keep a cup of water within reach. Then when you pick up a hot piece of glass you can cool the burn immediately which greatly reduces the damage. If you're quick, you don't get a blister at all, just a scorch mark on the surface (and a vile smell).
Jim
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Heh, I figured this out a while ago. Lick a burn as soon as possible and you'll never get a blister. Wonderful, eh?
Tim
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DMSO works great for burns, kills the pain and no blister.
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wrote:

Be careful with DMSO..its a cell membrane carrier...ie it will pass through cell membranes like shit though a seagull and as its also a solvent, it can carry toxins with it.
That being said..its good stuff when applied correctly on aches, pains and burns.
Gunner
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Samantha BOC franchise distribution to some small retailers who are easy to deal with; for example at work we get our argon cylinders exchanged at a local car parts shop in St Albans. Martin
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On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 00:47:33 GMT, "Martin Whybrow"

The killer in the UK is the bottle rental. BOC don't sell bottles AFAIK. I pay 35/year for an X size 3' tall argon bottle.
Since I don't do as much MIG welding as I did when I got the contract, I really need to take the bottle back because I now pay significantly more for the bottle than the gas :-(
Mark Rand RTFM
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I guess the reason why I am thinking to use propane/oxygen is after reading this site: http://www.ecu.edu/chem/glassblowing/ It has lots of info about putting together scientific glassware and it recommends oxy-propane for borosilicate work... I guess other people have had other experiences in practice however. I am also asking about oxygen because when I look at US sites for O2 they just straight up tell you the price for the tank of a certain volume. When I look at UK sites all I see is the hype and no prices. I am just wondering what people are paying for their gases, rental and refills etc. Although that may be too blunt a question. I am hoping to find the best supplier and not get ripped off. Thanks. :)
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By far oxy/propane is best for glass. Been so long since I bought my cylinders that I don't remember what I paid for them. I use them mostly for welding but when I get on a glass jag my Nortel Major will go through a 90 cu. ft. cylinder in about 20 hours.
Probably best to get on the phone and ask. They are out to sell stuff but cylinders are pretty generic so the only way you can keep from paying to much is to check out the local market. Customs vary from place to place. Down here in Georgia they swap out your purchaced cylinders for full ones. Other places refill yours. That means you have to worry about recertification every few years. Some places sell bigger cylinders. Here anything larger than 120 cu ft is rental only. Buy if you can. I have one big argon cylinder that I could have bought twice for the rent I have paid.
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Glenn Ashmore

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Just call any local welding supply. I pay about $20 for a "K" cylinder, 240 SCF. Cylinder about 5 feet high, weighs close to 100 pounds. That will last a long time. Check farm auctions. Many farms have complete oxy/fuel welding carts.
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