Can one breathe industrial oxygen

can industrial welding oxygen be used to breathe. Long term effects are of no importance whatsoever.

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On Jan 11, 6:33 pm, Ignoramus29041 <ignoramus29...@NOSPAM. 29041.invalid> wrote:

I was told by a friend who owned an industrial gas/welding supply company that it's the exact same oxygen; the only difference is the medical oxygen has a chrome valve on the cylinder.
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I've wondered too what Iggy asked. Not as in "fair-weather choices" but what could be done in a difficult situation where no choice is ideal. Rustyjames comments - thanks. Any other takes on this?
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wrote:

A friend fills his "flight tanks" from standard industrial (welding) cyl.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Mine too. O2 from my friendly welding supply.
--

Richard Lamb
email me: snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
  Click to see the full signature.
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Dare i ask the price difference between "industrial" and Aircraft/Medical oxygen?

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Brent wrote:

The welding stuff will cost you anywhere from 16c a cubic foot to (the sky is the limit) because it is often priced at whatever the welding shop thinks they can get.
Tractor Supply Co charges US$1.10 a cubic foot to refill a teensy 20 CF bottle and US$0.16 a cubic foot to refill a generous 251 CF bottle.
http://www.tractorsupply.com /
Search Term:'Oxygen Gas Contents'
I haven't bought the 'medical' grade stuff in a *long* time so I can't quote on that.
--Winston
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RCM only
wrote:

Looks like they get a ~$20 hookup fee and a few cents a foot for gas.
-- If you can solve your problem, then what is the need of worrying? If you cannot solve it, then what is the use of worrying? -- Shantideva
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Larry Jaques wrote:
(...)
(Tractor Supply Co Oxygen fill)

?
I scanned their FAQ and didn't see mention of a 'hookup fee'. Where did you see that, Larry?
--Winston
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wrote:

IANAB (bookkeeper) but I read between the lines by looking at the prices of gas by volume. ~ = approximately. <shrug>
-- Ask not what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive... then go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive. -- Howard Thurman
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Larry Jaques wrote:

That's the same as saying that they have a $100 hookup fee but they *pay you* $3.90 a cubic foot for the privilege of giving you a free refill on your 20 cu ft bottle, yes?
Dayum. I should have been a Salesman!
:)
--Winston
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wrote:

But wait, there's more!
Fill a larger bottle and the price is cheaper. We'll give you $0.19/cf for that privilege!
-- Ask not what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive... then go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive. -- Howard Thurman
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If you have to ask, you can't afford it............... ;-)
Steve
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On Tue, 25 Jan 2011 23:15:42 -0800, "Steve B"

I wonder why it is that we allow the medical, legal, and gov't to rape us as they do...
-- If you can solve your problem, then what is the need of worrying? If you cannot solve it, then what is the use of worrying? -- Shantideva
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On Tue, 25 Jan 2011 23:15:42 -0800, "Steve B"

In practical terms thnere is no difference.
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On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 17:59:48 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Sorry - missed the "price". Answer, from negligible to considerable, depending on where you get it and in what quantities
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Hey, this is a cool group. Just found it. I'm definitely a novice metalworker, though I have an ancient lathe and make stuff on it from time to time. I hope someday to own a better one, and a vertical mill to go with it (grin).
Around here, at least (mid-state NY), the price difference between welding O2 and USP (medical) O2 is negligible for the large (200cf-ish) cylinders. It's only a few dollars more for USP O2, though I don't recall exactly how much. Aviation O2 isn't available at my local gas supply company (I asked), so I never got a price on it.
As to whether one can breathe welding/industrial O2 safely, what follows is my opinion: It depends. For scuba diving, Technical Diving International gas mixing standards call for USP or Aviation O2 to be used for mixed-gas (Nitrox and Trimix) blending because the partial pressures of any contaminating gases rise as a function of depth, exacerbating their effects. Clearly, this also applies to using pure O2 under water.
At sea level or above, depending on whatever else was in there, you're still taking a chance. For example, consider a tank that contained 100% acetylene at atmospheric pressure before being filled with O2. The usual fill pressure of 2400 PSI would yield one part in 163 (2400/14.7), or ~6,100 ppm at sea level. The OSHA exposure limit for acetylene is 1,000 ppm. Oops. (Do your own math and research the exposure limits before you breathe anything!)
For CO, 50 ppm is a problem and 70 ppm is a real problem. 6,100 ppm is obviously Right Out. Even at 10,000 feet, where if I recall correctly flight crew must use O2 after 20 minutes, that's still 70% or so of 6,100 ppm (~4,300 ppm), so aviation use would not be safe either in this case. There could be other contaminating gases I haven't thought about that might be worse than CO. And if the fill pressure is 2105 PSI, the percentages are even worse.
Now, how an O2 cylinder would wind up *full* of a bad gas, or even with a high percentage of it, before being filled with O2 is not at all clear to me. Someone would almost have to work at it! Nonetheless, safe definitely beats sorry hands down in this case, and "probably OK" means that sometimes it won't be OK. Since "not OK" can translate to "dead," I'm going to continue to buy USP O2 for breathing.
My understanding is that USP and aviation grade O2 are put in cylinders that have been purged with O2 before final filling, so the maximum levels of contaminants are quite low no matter what's in the tanks before they are purged. This is a very "practical difference" to me when the O2 will be a breathing gas, even though the source of the O2 used to fill any tank (industrial, USP, or aviation grade) is very likely to be exactly the same.
--
John Eells (diver, and very non-current private pilot)

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JRE wrote:

Acetylene cylinders are purpose-built and can't be filled with anything other than acetylene.

It's 12,500 feet and 30 minutes. At least in the US. And the chances of finding a large C0 cylinder at a welding shop is just about zero.

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wrote:

If the tank was full of acelelene at atmospheric pressure before filling with oxygen the ppm od acelelene in the breathing gasses would be the absolute least of your problems, as pure acetelene in it's free form is extremely unstable at anything over about 16psi. Combine that characteristic of acetelene with 100% oxygen environment and you won't have a TANK, much-less an unbreathable mixture.
Also, putting CO into a highly pressurized pure oxygen atmosphere for any time would LIKELY end up with an exothermic reaction producing CO2.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Why is acetylene even in this discussion, it is kept in a special bottle in suspension in acetone.How would you get acetylene contamination in an oxy bottle?
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