putting feet on mill?

I am finally too embarrassed with the 2x6 wood pieces my Shizuoka B-3V bedmill
has been resting on since it was delivered...oh, only two years ago! :-o
I have 4 feet that came with the mill, each is a steel cup thing with a hard
rubbery insert. The steel cup is threaded for a 5/8" bolt. The mill has these
~1.25" threaded studs with a through hole for the 5/8" bolt. I am assuming you
turn the studs to level the machine and the 5/8" bolt is just to keep the mill
from slipping off the feet?
Ok, so uhm, how do I raise the 3.5 ton mill to get the feet on? I see a way to
do it by going back and forth with shims and the leveling studs, but uhg...
Also, once the feet are on, what procedure should I use to level the machine. I
read somewhere that you can tweak the feet on a mill to get that last little bit
of accuracy. Should I worry about that or just get the machine level with the
earth?
Thanks
Rick
Reply to
Rick
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Rick Do the feet you have look like these;
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so then you use the 1.25" threaded stud to set the height of the machine and coarse level. The 5/8" bolt screws into the 'hat' on the mount and expands the mount to do the final leveling. Take the 5/8" bolt and grind the end of it till it is flat or slightly convex and grease it well before installing it in the foot. If you don't grind and grease then the bolt may gall to the mount, experience speaking here. Do not expand the foot more that ~3/8" as it may separate. The 5/8" bolt must be tight to the bottom of the mount or it is not correct and may move/settle a bit. The mfg site is
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and your looking for leveling mount information. I'm guessing that you have LM5 mounts or equivalent from another mfg.
As far as raising the mill, use the 1.25" studs. Don't they screw in from the top? Raise the mill on the front end by screwing the studs into the base, grease 'um good, and onto the 2 by. When the front is off of the 2 by then shim up under the base behind the studs, back off the studs to release the 2 by and install the mounts on the front. Now raise the front pretty high so that you can get a spacer/pivot under the base, near the back, lower the front so that it rocks over to the front lifting the back and remove the rear 2 by and install the rear mounts. Use all 4 feet to raise the machine off the pivot. Set to height with the studs, and level with the mounts. lg no neat sig line
Reply to
larry g
See if the local rental yard has a "Hydraulic Maintenance & Repair Kit" - e.g. a Hydraulic Jaw of life or spreader beak - that can get under the foot area and push up (You do have wood there) (you could cut a notch out for a point to lift on. It typically has spreader bars that can be against the floor and a lifting point inches above also.
look at
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long string
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then top search for EU09050881 with MSC part number just below selected. Gives you a picture of what I'm thinking of and what to show or just to buy.
e.g. one pumps it up - blocks under something to hold if the pump fails - then add footings on that side.
If you have a square object - not a long or wide base - then you have to lift by overhead hoist.
You might go this way with the hand pump - jack up all corners - around and around - blocking and leveling as you get higher and higher. Once up - then put on the feet and jack it up - take out shim and round and round you go down the stair steps of shims that makes the taller stack... until you are out and on the feet.
Not an easy job - hoist or the like is faster and easier. Still block before you work under the floating mill.
Martin [ concept extracted from the brain - not from the shop. ]
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Thanks Larry,
I uploaded some pics of the feet to the metalworking.com dropbox.
Here is a closeup of the 1.25" stud (I really haven't measured it, just eyeballing):
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Here is a closeup of a foot pad and a footpad taken appart, and also the 1.25" stud:
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The 5/8" bolt in that pic was from my junkbox...I don't know where the original bolts are. It does seem as if the 5/8" bolt presses down on the metal plate on top of the rubber pad...perhaps expanding it like you said???
Here is a shot of one side of the mill, showing it unhappy resting on wood:
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Poor mill...it really wants some shoes.
I am going to try your grease and go idea tommorow, along with a large stack of shims....should take me oh, say 4 hours of turning (not much travel on those 1.25" studs. I tried a test lift of the mill with a solid steel 8 foot prybar...Mill 1, prybar 0. Damn big mill....sigh.
Rick
Reply to
Rick
No railroad jack in the area? I love mine for just this sort of thing. Jack up the front until its high enough for the feet, install, lower and repeat on the rear.
Gunner
"In my humble opinion, the petty carping levied against Bush by the Democrats proves again, it is better to have your eye plucked out by an eagle than to be nibbled to death by ducks." - Norman Liebmann
Reply to
Gunner
Rick After looking at the pictures it looks like you have one mount on already. Your mounts look to be functionally the same as the barrymount feet. When I originally wrote I pictured in my mind the 2 by's being under the mount holes. Do you have enough room to get the mounts under the mill and the bolts started? If so then you should be mostly home. If necessary can you bang the 2 by's to get clearance to start the mount bolts into the mount? lg no neat sig line
machine
Reply to
larry g
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suspect Gunner has one of these beautiful tools.
Martin
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
The 86A to be exact. Not bad for a $5 yard sale find, no? Its one of my most cherished possessions.
Gunner "In my humble opinion, the petty carping levied against Bush by the Democrats proves again, it is better to have your eye plucked out by an eagle than to be nibbled to death by ducks." - Norman Liebmann
Reply to
Gunner
Little late now, but that pic was of a mount without the rubber insert. Adding the rubber insert makes it about an inch or inch and a half taller. Anyway, all mounted and done now!
Rick
Reply to
Rick

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