Reducing a 5/8" shaft

Anybody with a lathe and some drills and taps could make you one.
My grandfather raised bees for many many years, and we spun the combs by hand with no real effort. He had a good sized two panel extractor. It never even occurred to us to motorize it. I suppose we might have tired of it if he had hundreds of hives instead of just a few.

Reply to
Bob La Londe
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Tire rim diameters for one. I've not checked the lug nuts, specifically, recently...
Reply to
dpb
AFAIK, tire sizes on all cars are some bastardized mix of SAE & Metric. But they all follow the same spec.
One thing that is allegedly universal is the tire Schrader valves. (If I can believe Click & Clack...)
Reply to
David Lesher
According to my friend Glenn, the upper part of the Chebby intake manifold which is aluminum is SAE, while the rest which goes to plastic (carboniferous or otherwise) is metric. He's playing with his daughter's new/used '07 GMC Yukon 4WD and _not_ loving it.
-- Doctors prescribe medicine of which they know little, to cure diseases of which they know less, in human beings of which they know nothing. --Francois-Marie Arouet Voltaire, about 250 years ago
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Probably a lot of precision in it to keep it from vibrating with imbalance. That is (part of) what you are paying for.
From my point of view, not having a welder does not matter, as I would not try to solve this with welding. It gets pretty tricky getting everything lined up to start with, and welding likes to introduce warpage anyway, which would put the axis of the new shaft extension not quite in line with the shaft of the honey extractor.
My tool of choice for making a direct in-line step-down adaptor would be a lathe.
Any idea what kind of speed step-up or step-down you got out of that pulley arrangement? I would likely prefer pulleys anyway -- it lets you find a place to mount the electric drill which does not have to be in line with the shaft of the extractor.
Can you point to a web page which has an image of the honey extractor -- just in case seeing it triggers other ideas. Things like does the shaft stick out horizontally, vertically, at an angle, and how far from an edge of the box (assuming that the shaft sticks out of an enclosure). All of these things could impact just how you need to mount the drill. (And the question which also comes to mind is how long a run is required? If it is going to be multiple runs of an hour or more, you will probably need to replace the brushes in the drill fairly quickly. The drill is made for only short bursts of run time and lots of sitting down cooling off.
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
My meter tells me the rims and tires are drawn/manufactured in metric to meet the inch dimension specs for diameters; it's just the nominal dimensions for them are still inches whereas afaik all the section data for tread width, etc., has gone metric. (You don't find an old 6.70-15 nylon cord other than perhaps in the restoration catalog any longer. :) )
That is so at least in the US. Even the large ag tires use the same valve stem dimensions so valve cores are interchangeable.
I don't know the thread sizes, though...so whether they are still SAE (or ever were) I don't know (and didn't feel like looking up :) ).
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Reply to
dpb
In the UK and I expect elsewhere in the world you can get solely metric dimensioned tyres and even in the UK be sitting down when you get told the price, often about 3 times that of a similar sized inch diameter tyre.
Reply to
David Billington
But we're talking the civilized world, not the island responsible for B-L, Lucas electrics, and SU carbs & fuel pumps....
"Why use one part, when two will do the same job half as well?"
Reply to
David Lesher
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On reflection, kinda' have to check on that one--I just got a set of replacement 7.50-20 bias ply 8-ply rating for the front of the old C60 that keep around for a seed tender. ('58 283, 4-sp/2-sp axle, 14-ft grain bed and hoist). The rears are 8.25-20 and also still available. I presume if look long and hard enough, most common sizes are still at least obtainable if not on the shelves at the local discount tire store.
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Reply to
dpb
Except none of the cars were British rather either French or German and not on all models. I suppose the maker got a good deal to use the tyre as OE and the few companies that made them cleaned up. I have heard of a few cases where new wheels were purchased with tyres and came in cheaper than just the OE spec tyres.
Reply to
David Billington
TRW had some metric specialty wheels, and Michelin made the tires for them, on one of the small Mustang specials back in the eighties, IIRC.
Reply to
clare
15 dolla no holla, ebay. Shopsmith router bit holder. This is new you can do better used. You will need a short length of 1/2" shaft. Ask a refrigeration or a/c tech for the 1/2" diameter, excess piece they just cut off of the motor they installed on someones unitor buy a 1/2" bolt with a long shoulder. 5/8" female I.D. x 1/2" female I.D. w/ setcrews each end. Watch the word wrap in the link. You are welcome ! Lyndell
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Reply to
Lyndell Thompson
The drill might have enough power, but it isn't intended to run for long periods. It'll likely overheat.
Instead of using pulleys and the gears inside a drill, just couple a real AC motor to the shaft; there's one in every junked furnace, dishwasher, washing machine... and a rotisserie attachment for a grill or oven is really a nice little gearmotor.
Reply to
whit3rd
And on my 1983 Thunderbird (probably Cougar as well). It was possible in subsequent years to swap in similar wheels (from later model years) that took tires that ARE still available.
Anybody want four nice alloy rims, that take NO available tire whatsoever?
Reply to
whit3rd

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