Sheet Metal Choices

I need to make some enclosures, and splash guards for some of my machines. I've got a tensmith brake That will handle upto about .100 mild steel. I've
done .125 5052 (annealed partway through), but its really to much for the machine.
Anyway, I really haven't done much sheet metal work other than crude light stuff.
I'm wondering what alloy and gage is going to give me good fairly rigid results at the best (not necessarily cheapest) cost. I know that's a huge over general basis to start with, but I really do not have enough general knowledge of sheet metal work to ask the right questions.
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The standard aluminum sheet at several places I worked was 0.062" 6061. WW2 heavy bombers were made from thinner metal, like 0.040".
Flanges on the edges makes panels -much- stiffer. For electronic enclosures we rarely welded the corners unless they had to be RF-tight.
If the panel had to support a 40 lb transformer it might be 0.093" thick.
I bought 0.050" 5052 to shear on my 30" 3-in-1 because 0.062 6061 strains it.
-jsw
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On Friday, June 12, 2015 at 12:41:09 PM UTC-4, Bob La Londe wrote:

First the alloy is not doing to change the stiffness.
I would use aluminum. Does not rust and easier to bend. Second choice would be galvanized sheet metal as used for heating ducts. Does not rust for a long time and is cheaper.
And I would pop rivet it together. And would stiffen it up by adding some angles on the inside edges where they will not show. And on the inside of any large flat pieces.
Dan
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I used steel on my grinders. Al is fine. Might want to run a stiffener strip along the top or where you can - to keep it from bending.
Using steel myself, I put it into my roller and put a rolled edge on which made it strong.
Martin
On 6/12/2015 12:43 PM, snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:

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wrote:

When I make sheet metal splash and chip guards for my machines I use either aluminum about 1/16 thick or galvanized steel about 1/2 to 1/4 as thick as the aluminum. The thicker stuff I use for large unsupported areas. I have made several box like enclosures over the years that were no more than 12 inches in any dimension out of thin galvanized sheet bought at the hardware store. I like the stuff because it is soft and easy to bend and it doesn't need paint for corrosion protection and is real easy to solder with plain old plumbing solder and flux. I'm pretty it is intended for making custom ductwork or for making modifications to stock ductwork. I hope it is because I have done just that a few times. Eric
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On Fri, 12 Jun 2015 11:02:34 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

I have been known to make small items from aluminium pop cans opened up and flattened, then held in place with a magnet. They aren't substantial enough to cause problems if a disaster should occur. For more durable items i call upon my supply of salvaged furnace duct or reclaimed al. dryer ducting. Whatever I can lay my hands on, even sheet plexiglass.
--

Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
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