Source for odd screws in the SF bay area ?

Anyone found a good source for odd screws in the SF bay area ?
Tried to find a "cheese head" metric screw today, no go.
Its for a machine part, so yea, it really needs to be a cheese
head (its the blade keeper on a 16" triumph paper cutter).
Reply to
Scott Moore
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"Scott Moore" wrote: Anyone found a good source for odd screws in the SF bay area ? ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I have had good luck dealing with Bowlin Equipment, 1107 10th Street, Berkeley, 510 527-8282. If they don't have it, they can often suggest a source, and they're really nice people.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Fastenall,
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has more than 1400 stores. Got to be one near SF. If they ain't got it, it ain't made.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 06:09:17 GMT, Scott Moore calmly ranted:
Try down around the docks, say Bay Street. I don't know if they troll Lombard or Broadway any more with all those cops. What? OH, you meant HARDWARE, didn't you. Sorry.
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that's what you're after. Try these guys in San Jose, less than an hour away (non-rush-hour on a good day.) ;)
Or you might run it past a print shop. They might know the local hardware sources pretty well and could point you in the right direction if they didn't stock one.
- Metaphors Be With You -
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Web Application Programming
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Can you cheat by finding a pan head and turning down the OD of the head?
Jeff
Reply to
Jeff Wisnia
My fave: The Olander Company Inc. is located at 144 Commercial Street, Sunnyvale, CA 94086 Call Toll Free (800) 538-1500 Fax: (408) 735-6515 E-mail: snipped-for-privacy@olander.com
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Plug in 'cheese' into the search window and hit 'go'.
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
A cheese head screw is vey close in diameter, if not the same diameter, as a fillister head screw. Which is the same diameter as a socket head cap screw. At least that's how I remember it. Ah, here it is. An example: M5 cheese head dia.= 8.5 to 8.14 M5 socket head dia. = 8.5 to 8.72 So, a metric SHCS screw will almost surely work if the bore is deep enough. The SHCS head is a little taller. You could make the head shorter by facing the socket end. I know it's not the same look but maybe that doesn't matter to you. Or, you could just look a little longer under the bench where the original probably rolled. :) ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
I figgered he knew about the diameter thing already but wanted the same look as the other screws, so that's why I suggested starting with a pan head. If the turned down head didn't come out quite thick enough, a washer under it could raise it up a bit. Or, you could just look a little
I still do what I did when I was a kid and lost a marble....
That's tossing an identical part under the bench, while keeping my eye on where it's going, and saying, "Brother, go find your brother."
Only works if you are a true believer...
A frequently used tool in my home shop is a homemade "magnet stick", a three foot long 1/2" dowel with a strong "rare earth" magnet securely taped to its end. Ninty percent of the stuff I drop under the bench is magnetic, so the odds are with me.
Jeff
Reply to
Jeff Wisnia
Normally I would, however, I am still in the phase of putting walls and power into the shop.
Reply to
Scott Moore
Low head socket cap screw?--8.5 dia x 3.5 high head for an M5.
But McMaster does have metric cheese heads. And why in the world are they called "cheese heads"?
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Yeah.... when I was a kid and lost my chewing gum in the chicken coop, I thought I found it 3 times..... sigh Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
[ ... ]
Picture a wheel of cheese. (Yes, I know that it is seldom seen in that shape these days.)
Now -- cut a slot across the top and you have something which looks like a larger "cheese head" screw. No dome to the top -- totally flat. No bevel on the edges -- totally cylindrical.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
One idea -
"Nuts To You " Fasteners 406S. HillView Drive Milpitas Ca, 95035
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Telephone : 408 956 0370.
The President of the company is Tim Doyle if that helps.
Martin
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
If you look at the profile of the head, it has verticle walls, a domed top and a flat bottom - much like a 'wheel' of cheese. Must have been a cheese head that named it.
Martin :-)
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
The ones which I have seen have had a totally *flat* head, not domed. Otherwise, it would match the description of another type, "fillister" head, I think.
A domed head would represent a spoiled wheel of cheese, I think.)
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols

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