tiny plastic tubing source

I am looking for very small plastic tubing with an ID of ~0.045" used in my tweeco gun for running aluminum. I don't have the OD with me but it is
around 0.125" . My dealer charges me over 50 bucks for them. The brass end simply unscrews off of the tubing and I could use it on new tubing. I checked McMaster but they don't have it. It must be used for something else, mechanical oil pressure switch line is close but the OD is too small. Thanks
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Clippard makes a full line of tubing like that in various materials.
Jim
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You might check chemical or chromatographic supply houses. Fisher Scientific, VWR, Supleco, Cole-Parmer or Alltech are good places to start. You might also try calling McMaster-Carr and see if they can special it for you.
FWIW, that tubing might be very cheap even from those sources. We needed some 1/8 OD x 1/32 ID Teflon tubing at work a while back and a coil ran us around $200, AIR.

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What material is it made of? I assume it gets hot, and so teflon is likely.
It sounds like "spaghetti" tubing intended for insulating bare wire might work if nested.
The traditional manufacturer is Alpha. For example, Alpha TFT-250-18 is made of teflon, has an ID of 0.042", walls 0.016" thick, so OD is 0.074", and costs $58.78 for 100 feet. FTF-250-13 is also teflon, 0.076" ID, walls 0.016" thick, so OD is 0.108", and costs $85.91. This would be a lifetime supply.
Anyway, such tubing can be bought for the above dollars from the usual electronic component distributors, like Newark and Allied.
One can also get clear PVC tubing, such as Alpha PVC-105-18 et al, for about the same money, but in a wider variety of sizes.
Alpha may well make the very heavy walled tubing used in the tweeco; a call to Alpha should tell the story.
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Try Small Parts, Inc.:
http://www.smallparts.com /
They carry lots of small tubing (and other useful things).
- Michael
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used in my

is
unscrews
McMaster but

oil
I don't have any on hand so I can't check the sizes, but take a look at the plastic tubing used for vacuum lines on most auto engines...
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The liner is usually PTFE, and is available from MSC. It's chemical hosing.
LLoyd
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The tweeco stuff is brown in color if that helps identify the material.

my
unscrews
but
hosing.
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wrote:

Usually, I just lurk, soaking up all of the good info. This time, I may be able to help.
The clue was the brown color. Perhaps what you have is PEEK (polyetheretherketone) tubing. Tough, fairly hard and has a working temperature range from -480 deg F to +480 deg F. Cool stuff, albeit, pretty expensive and exotic. It could also be high temp polyimide, which is also pricey, from a relative standpoint. Both types are listed in McMaster-Carr, although not at the specific size that you mentioned. A 0.125" OD x 0.062 ID PEEK tubing is listed for around $6 /ft and is indicated as a rigid tubing. The aforementioned Small Parts has the same size listed as "semi-flexible" for around $20 for a 3 foot piece. A wider selection may be available from other vendors.
Hope that helps, David Glos
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Dang, that _is_ cold, it's good for 20.33 degrees _below_ absolute zero? I wonder how they test that...
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wrote:

very carefully.
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On Mon, 2 May 2005 13:21:38 -0700, Charles Spitzer

I would imagine shrinkage would be a real problem at that point.
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Umm, considering my background in engineering, I really should have caught that. BLUSH! I certainly deserved that raz.
Another ref lists the melting point as 633 deg F and max working temp as 482 deg F. No lower limit listed.
You can see a photo and a little more infor at http://www.texloc.com/peek.html .
David Glos
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I used to work with cryogens (liquid helium, at 4.7 Kelvin) so it kind of caught my eye...

Cool...thanks.
Dave Hinz
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Maybe 4.2K?
How do you get stuff to work when it's so hot?
Jim
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You're gonna go make me look that up, aren't you? (hangs head in shame) My bad. Wonder how I screwed that up?

Well, it's left-handed Helium, of course.
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Well, some magnets do work at the critical point, which I think is 8 or 9 degrees. Maybe the ones you worked with ran well above atmospheric pressure, to keep air out of the system. That would raise it up above 4.2...
Jim
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Ah yes, we did run the magnets at a few inches of water of pressure. The burst disk was at 5 inches, I seem to recall. Fun when one of those goes...lovely cloud formations, lots of shouting on the factory floor, and at least one person in talking to the boss about cryogen costs and what they screwed up...
I may have to dig out my old paperwork & see if they say 4.7, or if that was my imagination. Have you ever seen GE's Magnet Safety tape? Lots of fun...
Dave
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jim rozen wrote:

Kelvin scale - almost absolute zero where all stops (so we think). Martin
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Right. Kelvin. But 4 K is practically boiling hot.
Jim
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