Turbocad users?


Hopefully someone on this group may know?
I'm looking at getting an older version of Turbocad off Ebay to play
with.
Would anyone know the difference between Turbocad "designer" and
turbocad "deluxe"?
I believe the deluxe will let you view your parts in 3D and designer
won't -- but need to confirm that.
I'm sure it probably has some other features as well?
THANKS
Reply to
mkr5000
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get the "professional" version - I just upgraded to V16, mechanical - that has cool features, but of course it's more pricey than the older versions - I sold my V14, the version I upgraded, to a co-worker.
what you may want to do is look on ebay and look on the turbocadd web site and see what combination of older version plus upgrade gets you the best price - the "deluxe" version is basically the entry level version - and I believe that "designer" is really focused on simple architectural models, though I didn't use that version - their web site is very good, and I've found their customer service and sales folks quite helpful, even with questions like this.
Reply to
Bill Noble
I echo Bill's advice - forget the DeLuxe and Designer versions and go for the Professional version. If you can't afford V16 Pro, then look for a V11 Pro - its just about the most stable version of all. The updates to take it to V11.2 are free from the IMSI website. V16 may have some more bells and whistles, but V11 is extremely capable. One of the best parts about TCAD is the support available from the forums.
Reply to
lemel_man
Ok -- will keep an eye out for V11 pro -- but let me explain what I'm after.
(1) First of all, I don't use cad every day and I need something as user friendly as possible.
(2) My parts are VERY simple drawings of small aluminum parts and all I need to do is ba able to export to DXF for the fabrication shop and have the part (hopefully in 3D with those dimensions listed as well). I generally just do simple bends, round holes etc.
Now -- I LOVE the software from emachineshop.com and the only other one I like (and I've tried them all) is one called A9CAD.
Very basic stuff but just what I'm after. When you start these programs, everything is very familiar even when you haven't used it in a year.
Unfortunately, emachineshop will only interface with their service which is extremely pricey and A9CAD doesn't give me a 3D view.
So, with all that in mind, what do you think?
Should I still go with pro?
I was looking at the Turbocad deluxe 14 because it's only 25 bucks -- you think it's worth a try?
There is a real market out there for a program that is easy, cheap and has a focus on creating CNC parts.
All the architectural and other stuff I'll never use.
Reply to
mkr5000
You really ought to look at Alibre. You can try it for 30 days free.
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Wes
Reply to
Wes
Even used pro is out of my budget -- so is Alibre.
21.95 for turbocad deluxe 14 and I bet it's more than I want -- I'm getting it.
Like I say, the day someone writes software like emachineshop.com for doing CNC parts, they will have filled a void.
You guys should try the emachine download and you'll know what I'm talking about.
It's a pretty small file and it's free.
Thanks for the suggestions.
Reply to
mkr5000
Have you looked at progeCAD 2008 Smart!
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?
It's free, although they do solicit donations to Doctors Without Borders for Darfur, "a western Sudan region in Africa, that endures a humanitarian crisis without precedents. All of the users that want to help us can make a donation."
People who have used it say it's so close to AutoCad the skills are totally transferable, and the file formats are identical. Not my skill set but I've had personal recommendations. You can download it, try it and keep it all for free - not a pig in a poke.
ISTM these days you are better off putting your time into marketable skills (and if you want to pay money it's tax deductible).
Reply to
N Morrison

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