varmint control -- moles and voles

Passive measures have been somewhat effective, but deflected varmints breed more varmints to deflect. Not acceptable. Tulips and iris
deserve defense.
http://users.goldengate.net/~dforeman/varmints /
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Chuckle! Way to go, Don! The ultimate cool tool of devastation.
We're overrun by moles here, and it's *illegal* to trap them in the state of Washington. No mention of bombs, though! <g>
Harold
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GREAT READ.
Reminds me of our troubles with ground hogs, woodchucks, in the barn. We tried everything without success. I mentioned the trouble to Craig at my local Co-op fertilizer and farm chemical supply. He said they had the same trouble and a solution. He told me to come back tommorrow with the truck and he'll have everything ready. Next day, I picked up a 1000 gallon tank of An-Hydrous Ammonia and a 100' length of reinforced plastic pipe with a metal barb on the end. Just stick the metal barb in the burrow and give 'em a good shot he said. He also said, be careful, this stuff is bad, stand back when you turn on the line.
When I gave those ground hogs a shot of Ammonia it stunk so bad I could feel the water being taken out of my lungs. I shut the barn up and left on vacation for a week. The odor was still noticeable when I came back. Not only were there no ground hogs, but all the mice were gone too. Haven't seen a groundhog sense.
Karl
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A hint from 1915:
http://www.mendosus.com/jpg/moles.jpg
:-)
-- Jeff R.
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wrote:

Wanna see my scars from that idea??? Use Don's sqib, an stand WELL back.
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Chuckle!
I just checked with my local bike and auto dealers for calcium carbide and received nothing but blank stares.
Could it be things have changed?
Harold
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|

| Chuckle! | | I just checked with my local bike and auto dealers for calcium carbide and | received nothing but blank stares. | | Could it be things have changed?
Phenomenally. Calcium carbide was used to make acetylene for lighting, welding, or other similar applications. Union Carbide grew out of that discovery. Add a little to some water and watch (?) it create the good stuff. Calcium carbide is still used in rare items, but don't recall what they are now. Better yet, you can do what I just did and do a brief search on the web for many sources and bits of information.
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"carl mciver" wrote:

and
lighting,
search
I used to order it in small quantities for a cannon when I was a kid; looks like they're still in business, too: http://www.bigbangcannons.com/catalog/bangsite.cfm
Wish I still had that old thing; they're spendier now.
Jon
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and
lighting,
Yeah, I'm quite familiar with it. I thought it was quite funny how an item that is now relatively difficult to obtain was so common in the early years, much like almost anything you can imagine today. My father was a hard rock miner before I was born and still did his share of prospecting years later. He had a couple carbide lamps that I used to play with while I was growing up.
Calcium carbide is still used in rare items, but don't recall what

search
Not really necessary, but I can add to your list the use in Big Bang model cannon, and in lowering the level of sulfur in iron previously melted in a cupola so it can be converted to ductile iron. It's made by "cooking* limestone with coke, as I recall.
Harold

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On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 11:31:53 -0700, the inscrutable "Harold and Susan

Ayup. Ah hear tell they caught summa them 'lectricity critters 'n run 'em around in things called "lidgit bulbs" in the car instead of waterin' thet carbide in the lanterns any more.
Tarnation, ain't technology wunnerful?
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spake:

and
<BSEG>
H
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Local hardware store carries it here :) Black Bird and Hubbards both have calcium carbide
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http://www.caves.org/member/mfraley/intro.htm Karl

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Karl Vorwerk wrote:

I still have and use a couple of genuine Justrite brass carbide lamps. :-) No, they are _not_ for sale.
Ted
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These are pretty commonly available on ebay.
Jim
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I have a fair collection of justrights and autolights and several other odd brand carbide lamps. A couple of them are still new in the box :) Always fun with the kids to show em my lams and "Burning Rocks" :) Glenn

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I also have an overabunance of moles........I crank up my 8 hp tiller, and utilize a corrugated stainless steel cryogenic fill hose i scrounged that I attach to the exhaust, and pour in a couple of tablespoons of insecticide like Dursban or carboral (sp?) and also a some small mothballs of crystals, and fire up the motor, and place the end of the hose into the tunnels, and let it run. I allow smoke and fumes to come out of various passages for awhile, then start to block them off a little at a time as they become saturated with the fumes. Been pretty sucessfull at reducing the tunnels and critters, but they always return. I have quit spending money on baits and traps as most times they are worthless in a lot of situations. ALthough my little miniature dachshunds have no problems with moles, as they can literally tear up and excavate the entire yard in no time flat and usually come up with the critters doing the tunneling...........however its at the expense of having to do a larger repair to the lawn in the end.........
On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 01:53:06 -0500, Don Foreman

=============================================Put some color in your cheeks...garden naked!
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Don Foreman wrote:

I'm curious about your squibs, Don. It looks to me like you pass current through a wire just below the head of a kitchen match. Does that wire heat up enough to fire the match?
GWE
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On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 08:08:30 -0700, Grant Erwin

If you look very closely, you might see a fine wire going over the top of the matchhead. It is a single strand from a bit of lampcord, about .010" dia. It goes thru two slits in the bottom of the stick. The leads are connected to it. 12 volts is plenty to heat this fine wire to melting point and ignite the match. The matchhead provides physical support, and also provides "staying power" with ample fuel to burn thru the baggie after the fine wire has done it's job and is history.
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wrote:

heat
I used to fire my home built cannon (1/2" water pipe) that way when I was a kid. I had a power supply from an old radio that I used as a power source to heat that single strand of copper you spoke of. . Probably saved by buddy's life one day, when he wanted to light it by hand but I insisted we do it with electricity. We fired it from the safety of the basement of the house, which had a large ding in it from the barrel that was propelled backwards from a huge overload of home made black powder and a wrist pin from an old lawn mower engine. How did any of us live to be adults?
Harold
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