Visit to a scrap yard

I was at a scrap yard and I was very impressed.
First, they did not try to cheat me. I weighed some things prior to going there and their weights were about same. Second, they had a very
menacing crushing excavator like monster made by Terex, that worked like mad. Third, they were actually quite nice and gentle with me, worked hard not to break my truck and trailer.
I scrapped 2.5 tons of steel and some misc stuff. Say, one machine that I bought for $50 and could not sell on ebay for 299 (an antique 1928 paper cutter), fetched $300 in cash. Now I understand a little better how those guys bid on machines at auctions and scrap them. It is a very nice business with the rght capability. It would be a lot easier to just drive that machine to a scrap yard.
I will be their regular client. The place is called Cozzi O Brien Recycling.
i
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My cousin did scrapping for a couple years until he recently got a job in his field again. He said he did ok working 3 days a week but he worked 5 or 6 when he could because it can be pretty brutal work in the winter time where he lives.
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I've taken scrap to several places, in Rochester, NY area. I'll never go back to Kreigers, because they have several times short weighted me at the scales. Even when I'm standing next to the guy and watching the scale, they still short me.
Other yards are more honest. One time I had a load of BX electical cable. Phoned. One yard quoted me 5 cents a pound for scrap, another yard quoted I think 80 cents a pound for the copper content. Good idea to call around.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
My cousin did scrapping for a couple years until he recently got a job in his field again. He said he did ok working 3 days a week but he worked 5 or 6 when he could because it can be pretty brutal work in the winter time where he lives.
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Hope you told all your neighbors?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
LOL. I filled a propane bottle for my BBQ once at a local business. They started with the meter on 0.2. Filled the hose before opening the bottle so it jumped to .4 before opening my valve. Filled it to 4.7, and then wrote down 5 gallons on the ticket. When I told the manager why I wouldn't be coming back he just said, "Ok." LOL. I haven't been back. Not even for a soda.
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On 1/12/2012 5:23 PM, Ignoramus13479 wrote:

Did they tell you about removing all the liquids in whatever you bring?
Paul
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They did not seem to care, there probably was oil in that generator engine that I scrapped (after taking off all valuable, small parts like injection pump).
i
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On 1/12/2012 7:45 PM, Ignoramus13479 wrote:

Each state must be different in that area. Here in Oregon, the scrappers cannot accept any scrap material with oil or other prohibited liquids. I was at Schnitzer Steel in Bend a few years ago and saw them turn away several people bringing vehicles that had not been drained. Not their rule, but the state EPA doesn't want the stuff spilled in the ground and run off into the ground water.
When we lived in Washington, I took and old International truck engine to a scrapper and had to certify that I had removed all oil, etc.
Paul
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No one asked any questions, the engine was put on a scale, then tossed in a pile to be ripped apart by the Terex Fuchs MHL 350 scrap tosser.
i
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On Thu, 12 Jan 2012 23:02:20 -0600, the renowned Ignoramus13479

This is why real estate that used to be a scrapyard (and nearby sites) can often be an environmental nightmare.. oil and other fluids released get into the soil (and migrate by air or underground)-- and it can cost millions of dollars to remediate.
http://www.metalbulletin.com/Article/2648851/AMM-Scrapyard-cleanup-in-NY-could-cost-238M.html http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20100921006819/en/Indiana-Court-Approves-4.3-Million-Cleanup-Settlement
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
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"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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http://www.metalbulletin.com/Article/2648851/AMM-Scrapyard-cleanup-in-NY-could-cost-238M.html
http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20100921006819/en/Indiana-Court-Approves-4.3-Million-Cleanup-Settlement
Buying a former scrap yard or a scrapping operation (people who buy stuff and scrap it) is definitely not on my priority list! Very scary stuff.
I have seen places where oil was puddling in giant, cavernous buildings. They were muddy inside, but the liquid in mud was used oil, not water.
i
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2012 04:28:11 -0600 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    What I want to know is: if I am buying a scrap yard or other industrial site, with the intent of keeping it as an industrial, why is it so necessary that I clean it up as if it would be used as the playground of a daycare?
    The EPA (State and fed) is run by people who have no idea of what they are actually accomplishing.
tschus pyotr
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pyotr
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On Fri, 13 Jan 2012 12:18:29 -0800, pyotr filipivich

Because the country is full of sites that were once industrial, that left polluted land and water behind them, where the industry is gone and are now fit for nothing -- as well as spreading their pollution through ground water and even the air.
I'm from NJ. Ask me for examples.

And you comment about things of which you have no idea of what you're talking about.
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Ed Huntress

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-0500 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    And, those sites are all now being used as playgrounds for daycares?????

    So the assumption is that this industrial park will become a playground for a daycare, and before a new industry can start operations, the area must be made safe for toddlers to crawl about on?

    So maybe you can explain why an industrial site must be a pristine as a daycare playground.
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pyotr
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On Fri, 13 Jan 2012 13:49:26 -0800, pyotr filipivich

We have a condemned Oakite site in my town, which it cost us a couple of million bucks to make safe for a park, where kids now play. Is there something else you have in mind?
Are we supposed to let the polluters determine what we can do with the land after they leave?

What new industry? They're gone, and that division went bankrupt. They just left us the mess.
Another example that still grates my ass was a plant north of Princeton where they did developmental research for plastic processing (for manufacturing golf balls, of all things). They went bankrupt and left. After they left, the town found PCBs in the well water and traced it to the plant site.
So all of our wells were condemned and we had to pay $10,000 per house to have city water installed. Out of our pockets.
Shall I go on?

Because they have no right to destroy the land for any future use.
--
Ed Huntress

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Don't laugh. The old Orkin pest control place in Victor, NY is now a day care.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

And, those sites are all now being used as playgrounds for daycares?????
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On Fri, 13 Jan 2012 13:49:26 -0800, pyotr filipivich

Even the industrial sites are not ALLOWED to get that poluted today because the chemicals get into groundwater, with the plumes spreading for MILES, damaging wells and streams.
Old industrial sites NEED to be remediated - and there are different classes of remediation - and limits on what those brown-sites can be used for
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca on Fri, 13 Jan 2012 20:17:20 -0500 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    Okay, this I can understand. The need to clean up pollution. The question I still have is - why would an industrial site in an industrial zone, be required to be restored to being as pristine as a day care playground?
    Why is it that TV and Computers are consider hazardous waste because of the lead in the glass? Is that going to magically leech out of the glass?
    It is the old bit about 80/20 - eighty percent of the project takes up eighty percent of the budget, the other twenty percent takes up the remaining eighty percent. We now have a technology which can detect "contaminates" at the parts per trillion level - so that is made the standard, regardless of feasibility or hazard.
    Meanwhile the EPA is fining refinery companies for not blending in enough ethanol made from wood chips and the like. Never mind that in 2011 there was no production of such bio-fuel, their regulations mandated that refiners would blend 6.6 million gallons of it into gasoline and diesel in 2011. For 2012 they face a quota of 8.65 million gallons. All hail the Emperors new Bio-fuel!
    "The Country is in the very best of hands"
tschus pyotr
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On Sat, 14 Jan 2012 10:10:33 -0800, pyotr filipivich

As far as I can tell you introduced the "clean as a daycare playground" cleanup standard. Did I miss something that supports that as a real requirement? It's certainly not the case with cleanups in this area that I'm familiar with.
--
Ned Simmons

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in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    I probably over spoke, but that does seem to be - if not a stated goal, an unspoken one. (Yes, IOW: I have no cites for such a position, other than Rhetorical) But, there does seem to be a enough documented nuttiness by the EPA, that one could believe they do insist on such a goal for industrial remediation.
    I recall a case where the EPA was after the mining company for their failure to file a remediation plan a for patch polluted by spilled fuel on their property. The reason no plan had been filed was that the fuel spill had been in the open pit mine, and the patch which had been so polluted was now fifty feet in the air, the "soil" having been dug up and run through the smelters.
--
pyotr
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