What do you think about this trailer

I think everyone's comments on the axle location is based on the camera angle of the original photo, combined with the width of the fenders. It makes it look like the near side tandem is right at the back of the trailer, but looking at the far side fender shows it is actually much closer to a standard 60/40 setup (on a tandem, measure to the pivot pin on the walking beam between the springs). If you post a square side-on shot, I suspect most of these comments will stop.
So with a 10k rating, I assume there are brakes on both axles? In my state, trailers with that sort of rating also need to be inspected (the cutoff for brakes and inspections is 3k, here).
So what'd you haul home that needed that sort of capacity, a VMC? Forklift? Wasp radial? CNC plasma table? Several pallets of untempered import hammer heads? Tire from an earth mover to be used as a jungle gym?
--Glenn Lyford
Reply to
Glenn Lyford
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I am guessing that the empty trailer weighs 2,000 lbs, 3,000 at most.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus7432
Take it to a scale at a truck stop and weight it. A truck scale will give you your front axle, rear axle, trailer and gross combined weights for about $10.
Reply to
Pete C.
Great idea.
And this is how it looks:
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With a photo shot straight from a side, it does not look that unbalanced.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus7432
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Nope, but it looks heavy. Also those are the two piece clamp type wheels, which are an older heavy duty style. You're going to want a spare of course.
Reply to
Pete C.
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It looks heavy to you because it is a tilt bed.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus7432
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The dropdeck is definitely better. But with a winch mounted on the front of the tilt deck, you can move a lot of stuff fairly safely. I moved a Bridgeport with a landscape trailer by removing the back ramp and jacking up the front until the back of the deck was on the ground. Not ideal, but I got the machine in my garage.
Reply to
ATP
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We'll see who's estimate is closest to correct once you weigh it...
Reply to
Pete C.
Guys, sorry for a dumb questionm how do those tilt beds work? Are they supposed to be raised unloaded, then equipment driven on, and it would drop back to its original position when the forklift or bobcat deives far enough forward? Is that right?
Reply to
Ignoramus7432
Depends on the design but what you have is right for many.
When empty they will tilt up so you can load. Some use hydraulics, others use a sliding axle system, others just gravity.
That trailer you posted looks like a standard beavertail that doesn't actually tilt. You drop the rear ramps and drive up those.
Reply to
Steve W.
It does tilt, for sure. I cannot try it right now, because it is loaded.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus8416
The photo is more confusing than helpful. It makes it look shorted and heavier on the nose than it really is.
Here's a better photo that I made after loading a 6,000lbs crane on it:
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The trailer has a 14 foot bed.
I have a feeling, based on something factual, that this is actually a 12k trailer, but it is titled as 10k, which is fine with me.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus8416
The price was OK, better than ebay, but not something to really brag about.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus8416
Proof that a pic can confuse things. I would have said nine feet with six ahead of the wheels.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
This is where picture decoding skills come helpful. On the left side -- closest to the photographer -- you see the part ahead of the wheels enlarged, and the area behind the wheels obscured.
Now, if you would look at the right side of the trailer -- farthest from the photographer -- the trailer proportions do not look so crazy.
I went to the auction site and actually looked at it before bidding, as I needed a trailer ASAP and did not want to byu a lemon.
After putting about 300 miles on it, this one does not seem to be a lemon, however the electricals do not work. Also, the front lifting jack clearly bent itself out of position.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus8416
I hope the "factual" item isn't a rating plate on the trailer. That plate is what the DOT goes by to determine if the trailer is CDL level or not.
If it says 12K I hope you have a CDL. Unless you like large fines.
Reply to
Steve W.
On that subject, how are you doing getting your CDL Iggy?
Reply to
Pete C.
There is no tag left on this trailer.
I read 1.5 books out of 3 by now. I will probably take the next in 4-6 weeks.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus30681
Yeah, you couldn't really see the beaver tail at all in that. --Glenn Lyford
Reply to
Glenn Lyford
The electrical is a simple problem you've probably already fixed - half the time they just let all the lamps beat themselves to death. LED Lights are the way to go on any trailers, they ride too rough.
Might want to move the tail lights closer to the rear, they shouldn't be set back more than a few inches from the corners. You can always take 3/8 round bar and bend up some protection hoops around the tail light fixtures.
The best trick is to wire it like a Commercial trailer with separate Stoplights (takes 4 tail lights) and put a 7-pin or 9-Pin commercial round FEMALE connector on the tongue. Then it can work with either style of tow vehicle tail lights, and you can make separate connector cables to adapt to the truck you are towing it with.
Straight-through cable if you rent a Semi Tractor, 7 Commercial to 7 Travel Trailer if you have your pickup wired like that, 7 Commercial to 6-pin round...
Don't do any more to the tongue jack than make sure it didn't rip anything, and replace the bolts. If you fix it, you'll just drag it in a driveway and bend it again.
If you really insist, you'll have to put on a reinforced "Skid Shoe" to take the brunt of a dragging. Or get a big cast-iron caster wheel and hard-mount it right there so it rolls over the driveway apron. Look at the wheels they mount under the back bumpers of motorhomes for inspiration.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman (munged human

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