What is a "audio jack outlet" called?

On Mon, 30 Aug 2010 15:11:38 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@prolynx.com wrote:


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Not always, since that connector with female contacts which connects
the mains to your PC is a female plug, and the connector with male
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On Mon, 30 Aug 2010 15:11:38 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@prolynx.com wrote:

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Nope.

The thing that plugs into your PC and connects it to the mains is a
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wrote:

The term "Jack" comes from "Jacking in", as in the headsets folks used. The US mil nomenclature, perhaps borrowed from early Brit RADAR monikers, is what has been around for a long time. Connectors are either panel or bulkhead mounted, or flying lead mounted. The cables that connect to them are nearly always "flying lead" variety, with the exception being a hard mounted "plug" on a slide tray.
They are ALL "connectors" but the idea was so that anyone looking at a schematic would know right away what kind of hardware was associated with a given schematic element. Not everyone that uses schematics are engineers, or have the common sense to know when a link between two schematic sections is a detachable cable. So we provided yet one more element to ease that lack. The really sad thing is that it never got made into rules or fully embraced or implemented, so we have folks that have no clue about it, and no common sense to figure it out.
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On Mon, 30 Aug 2010 13:12:11 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

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A "plug" is a connector, male or female, meant to be movable and
attached to a cable, and a "jack" is a connector receptacle meant to
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Most of the time you use a male plug for many things. I guess all my male/female extension cords have nothing but plugs. I'll still say my extension cords also have jacks. Audio connectors don't usually have high voltages to worry about unless its 70 volt, or connections to an electrostatic speaker, or electrostatic headphones, but I try to keep power feed lines female.
My sink also has a plug attached with a chain, but there is no jack.
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It comes from the phone industry. The RJ in an RJ-45 interconnection designates "Registered Jack".
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On Aug 30, 2:58pm, Ignoramus24925 <ignoramus24...@NOSPAM. 24925.invalid> wrote:

Radio Shack should have an octopus cable with one of each size, to identify yours.
jsw
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The female is the jack, the male is the plug.
You want a panel-mount jack.
(whatever size it is, but it sounds like a 1/8" miniature jack)
LLoyd
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On Tue, 31 Aug 2010 07:10:05 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Only in weird places like the USA...
English for electricians:-
A Jack plug is a male TS or TRS connector.
A Jack socket is a female TS or TRS connector.
If it's any other type of connector, it isn't a Jack :-|
If it mounts to a chassis then it is a chassis mount jack socket. Chassis mount jack plugs are almost unheard of, but line mounted jack sockets are often used for extension cables.
They were used in telephone exchanges for many years before people started using them for other things.
They are now available in 1/4" 3.5mm 2.5mm. 1/4" was the original telephone jack size.
That's the English English version, by the way :-)
Mark Rand RTFM
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Mark Rand wrote:

The AC mains connector on your computer???

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Richard Lamb



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Wouldn't even be a 14" Jack connector, let alone the smaller sizes :-)

Mark Rand RTFM
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    It is a "miniature (or subminiature) phone jack", (female).
    What diameter the plug is can vary, so measure that. I see 2.50mm (3/32"), and 3.50mm (1/8") listed in Digikey. They are two conductor (tip and sleeve) or three conductor (tip, ring, sleeve). Stereo audio connectors tend to be tip-ring-sleeve design.
    The standard sized (and rare these days) phone plug is 1/4" diameter, and I believe that there is also a (even more rare) 3/16" diameter.
    Some are also set up to close or open extra contacts as you plug in the male connector.
    Here is one three circuit one 1/8" diameter by Switchcraft to be found at http://www.newark.com/ -- look for Newark part number 27B9344 or Switchcraft part number 35RAPC2BV4.
    They are $3.42 each.
    Mounting is through a hole in the panel, secured by the knurled nut visible spun up against the body.
    It looks as though this one is the stereo (three circuit) with two switch contacts made or opened as you insert the plug. (Though the illustration does not show the extra solder terminals required for that.)
    Assuming that the URL found by the search is not a volatile one, you can simply try:
<http://www.newark.com/switchcraft/35rapc2bv4/connector-assemblies-jack-audio/dp/27B9344
    You can find several on their catalog page 983
    Measure your plug, so you know which one you really need.
    You can likely even find them still at Radio Shack. :-)
    Read up on the Wikipedia page:
        <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRS_connector
to see lots of versions.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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