What is it? Set 273

440 yards equals 1/4 mile.
Reply to
David G. Nagel
Loading thread data ...

An interesting sideline to this message is that the US Dept of Homeland Security are requiring the muleskinners at a Pennsylvania State Part to have the same security clearance/badges as longshoremen at ocean ports.

Reply to
David G. Nagel

Sounds right... 18 holes can be over 6000 yards on the scorecard from the black tees.

Reply to
Dave Balderstone

Of course you're aware of the damage a mule at 4 miles an hour hitting a building would do? Need I say how much more devastating it would be if you got him up to a trot before impact? They're just thinking of our safety. I'm sure elephant mahout's will be next. After all they make mules look like 12,000lb airplanes. Karl

Reply to
kfvorwerk

Actually they are most likely worried that the muleskinners will use the mules to packmule explosives or something into the rebuild canal to nowhere...

Dave

Reply to
David G. Nagel

4 mph! Did any muleskinners walk? I was thinking of those who built levees and dragged logs, but now that I think of it, I don't remember any photos.

Aha! A CNN photo shows those Pennsylvania muleskinners walking as their mules pull a boat!

Reply to
E Z Peaces

Reply to
Lee Michaels
1553:

Are you sure that transmitter is a two-channel? Several manufacturers of radio control equipment used to make transmitters with three-axis sticks (up-down, left-right, and rotation), and they always had oversized knobs. The slider on the left may be the fourth channel, for throttle. Ace R/C made the best of these, and they actually work pretty well for flying. With rudder on the rotation and aileron R-L, they were much more intuitive for cross-controlling aileron and rudder than two-stick controllers are. It's a mystery to me why they are off the market. Maybe they were too expensive to manufacture.

David

Rob H. wrote:

Reply to
David Kazdan

David, Two channels, for sure. The knob is just a steering wheel. This particular transmitter was very popular with R/C car racers back in the day - only need steering and throttle. The throttle is a small lever on the right hand side, can't see it in Rob's photo. This eBay item shows a little bit of the throttle control:

formatting link
slider on the left is the on/off switch. I have a couple of these in my attic - after seeing the eBay prices I may have to try to market 'em! Kerry

Reply to
Kerry Montgomery

Gunner

"Lenin called them "useful idiots," those people living in liberal democracies who by giving moral and material support to a totalitarian ideology in effect were braiding the rope that would hang them. Why people who enjoyed freedom and prosperity worked passionately to destroy both is a fascinating question, one still with us today. Now the useful idiots can be found in the chorus of appeasement, reflexive anti-Americanism, and sentimental idealism trying to inhibit the necessary responses to another freedom-hating ideology, radical Islam"

Bruce C. Thornton, a professor of Classics at American University of Cal State Fresno

Reply to
Gunner Asch

Or a cosmetics counter with your wife?

--riverman

Reply to
riverman

Indeed!!!

"Lenin called them "useful idiots," those people living in liberal democracies who by giving moral and material support to a totalitarian ideology in effect were braiding the rope that would hang them. Why people who enjoyed freedom and prosperity worked passionately to destroy both is a fascinating question, one still with us today. Now the useful idiots can be found in the chorus of appeasement, reflexive anti-Americanism, and sentimental idealism trying to inhibit the necessary responses to another freedom-hating ideology, radical Islam"

Bruce C. Thornton, a professor of Classics at American University of Cal State Fresno

Reply to
Gunner Asch

I thought that's how the canal got rebuilt in the first place.

Reply to
Matthew Russotto

Right. Here's the sort I was thinking of:

formatting link
|66%3A2|65%3A12|39%3A1|240%3A1318|301%3A1|293%3A1|294%3A50

Reply to
David Kazdan

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.