What is it? Set 373

Rob H. wrote:


RF shielding and easy to form.

They usually come as a set of B&R.

Carbon block for better voltage control, carbon powder because it's cheaper and easier to fill the container rather than machining an entire block.

If it's a kit or home built item the owner knew what it was, why label it. Plus it looks like it had been repainted, there could have been printing on the original paint.

Doesn't really require it for a dummy load.
--
Steve W.

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    [ ... ]

    Shielding -- keep the signal inside -- or keep an external signal from getting in.

    Commonly supplied in colored pairs, as they are commonly used for speaker outputs on amplifiers. You can buy them all in one color, or in mounted pairs or whatever, but the most readily available are in red/black pairs. Aside from the red and black, in good quality ones, such as those by Greyhill, I also have some green and blue ones.
    Here is what Graywhill's binding posts look like:
<http://www.grayhill.com/web1/TABproducts.asp?SolutionCatID66&LevelID=3&TabID=1
note that tehy come either with individual panel insulators, or ones which hold two at the standard 3/4" spacing. (For that matter, I know that they at least once had triangular patterns of three as well. Downloading the data sheet, I no longer see the triangular three post base insulator. But these were perhaps twenty years ago. :-)
    From other makers, I have also seen yellow and white ones.
    Others, once made by General Radio, were available in three colors -- red, black, and bare metal. The latter was used as a ground, the black was often right next to it with a sliding link to allow grounding it or not at need, and the third was red, which was the hot side.
    But these look like the poor quality ones which were once sold by Radio Shack -- and those would have been sold with the assumption that they would be used as speaker terminals, thus the red and black pairs. Radio Shack also offers (at least on their web site) some better quality ones as well.
    I just went searching on Radio Shack's web page, and found this (among others):
    <http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId !03984>
These look very much like the ones which were in the device under discussion. They are sold in packs of two pairs -- two red and two black.

    Perhaps to even out clumping? Was there no carbon powder in contact with the rods?
    Note that carbon granule microphones in use tended to clump, and had to be bumped to break up the clumps. Think of the old telephones (which used carbon granule microphones), and how occasionally they would produce weak sound. If you bumped the microphone end of the handset against a table it would break up the clumping and improve the sound level.

    Could be -- or if it was unique -- or one of only a few, the distinctive color pattern could explain what it was to those who were presumed to need to know. :-)

    A complete copper shield does not have to be grounded to block RF. It can be advantageous to ground it if you want to control buildup of static voltages, of course.
    Or -- it could be that there was a connection from the black binding post to the copper case -- which would serve as the requested reason for the two colors.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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It was fabricated by someone comfortable with soldering irons...

Possibly one is not insulated from the case, that'd be the 'black' one.

The powder makes a better connection to the electrodes and keeps the assembly from breaking connection.
I'm guessing this was a dump resistor to make a HV capacitor safe; when working on HV electronics, it's common to use a shorting chain on a long wood pole as the final step before getting your hands into the works for maintenance, but sparks are annoying (and molten chain bits have to be chiseled off the insulators...) so there's usually a slow discharge resistor. I've seen long vinyl hoses filled with slightly conductive buffer solutions, with multikilovolt power capacitors. The likely voltage range for this construction is ~1kV or less. Calibration and stability aren't important in this use, but heavy conductors and failsafe conductivity are.
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Rob H. wrote:

It might have been some type of vibration sensor or a form of microphone,
John
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    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    O.K. The copper makes a good electrostatic shield.
    If the powder is truly carbon, it *could* be some kind of vibration transducer -- similar to a carbon microphone -- where vibration changes the resistance. Perhaps something for detecting footsteps in the forest or something similar.
    I presume that there were no experiments with measuring at the terminals prior to disassembly?
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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The owner of it said that he did some tests a few years ago (capacitance and resistance) but the results were indeterminant.
Rob
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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always:
2149)    Looks like something designed to count out the     number of lengths     of some product -- perhaps cheese or butter. The device with a     handle below it would appear to be for scribing a cutting line     for thicker things, or for cutting fully through thinner things.
    Since the smaller one seems to increment in steps of 2, I would     guess that these are units of weight -- ounces or pounds.
2150)    Hmm ... the '$' seems to be upside down as shown, which     suggests that it would be used while standing on the item,     perhaps to mark the end of a length of log as accepted.
    How long is the handle? It sort of looks like a sledge hammer,     but I'm not sure.
2151)    Perhaps for forming round cakes of soap or something similar,     with the adjustment screw tuning for the final size.
2152)    Drive it into the end of a section of log, then screw it in to     split the log.
2153)    Where is the hole in the spike? On the end? (Not clear from     the photo). If so, I might think that it would be used in a     church for installing candles in candelabras and lighting them     with a thin wax taper running through the spike. (I don't see     the sliding part to adjust the extension of the taper, however.)
2154)    A carrying case for a badly unbalanced dumbbell set. :-)
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Someone sent me the photo so I don't know exactly where the hole is but was told that there is one.
Tough set this week but most of them were answered correctly, still not sure about number 2152, the rest of the answers have been posted here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2011/01/set-373.html#answers
Rob
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Hey Rob. Here's a better video of a Tesla coil in action. The guy is in a Farraday suit holding two fluorescent tubes in his hands. Tell me _that_ guy isn't brave!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3G_oXcCzBqk

I also have some strong doubts about the item that you listed as a cigar holder. Yes, it has strong similarities to the cigar holding patent link your provided, but there are enough functional differences that I don't see how it could be one. The one pictured in your quiz has a widening 'mouthpiece' and no provision for a foot or anything to keep it from rolling over if put down. The widening mouthpiece is very problematic for something meant to inhale through - something with appreciable resistance. The tiny hole in the hollow pointed barb that pierces the cigar would have very little air flow to start with, and that coupled with a widening and fairly large opening where ostensibly someones' lip would be, would make the draw very, very difficult. When people inhale through something with resistance, they purse their lips, not hold their lips wide. Have the owner of that holder try to smoke a cigar through it and I would bet dollars to donuts he will confirm my suspicions.
R
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By far the best use of Tesla Coils are all the people using them to play actual songs. Like this one here where they are playing the US national anthem on the Telsa Coils.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xkWf84muGRQ

Or this one where they played the Star Wars Imperial March on one of those TV talent contents
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJyYhcZwb7E

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Those are great, I added the first one to the site.
Thanks, Rob
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On 1/28/11 6:10 PM, RicodJour wrote:

Well, a trumpet has a big mouthpiece, and the player purses his lips inside. However, smoking that way could leave stains around the lips, something I doubt the inventor would like. The invention had a mouthpiece that fit into the metal tube.
The invention had a bulb to catch liquids. The mystery item has none.
The parts of the invention unscrew for easy cleaning. The mystery item doesn't appear to be screwed together.
45 215 looks little closer, but still substantially different.
I wonder if the mystery item was made to let somebody smoke a cigar for five minutes and put it out without having it stink if he didn't relight for a day or so. As smoke is drawn through a cigar, water and oil condense in the tobacco. If you put it out and carry it around, it will stink as those oils get old. The mystery item could keep smoke from condensing in the tobacco by drawing it through the probe, near the burning end.
Drawing the smoke through the length of a cigar cools it. The big brass tube would be a way to cool smoke drawn from near the tip. The fatter the tube, the slower smoke travels, and the more time it has to transfer its heat to the metal. There may have been a mouthpiece that slipped into the end of the tube.
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What trumpet player inhales through it? The PSI would be a function between the relative sizes of the two ports. On any of Rob's posts we could always surmise that a piece is missing to make our guesses 'work'.
R
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On 1/28/11 8:58 PM, RicodJour wrote:

Is PSI pressure? Pressure would be atmospheric pressure minus losses from restrictions. Those losses would vary according to flow. The losses of drawing a puff of smoke through a cigar and through a wire-sized orifice are likely to be small.
I put my finger over the little end of my trumpet mouthpiece, put my lips into it, and puffed in, moving my finger enough to let air leak with resistance. It worked fine. If I smoked a whole cigar that way, I might need to wipe away a ring around my lips.
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J Burns wrote:

I seriously doubt if any real smoker would even consider such a thing. One of the most important, but most overlooked (or ignored) aspects of smoking anything is, it's something to stick in your mouth. :-)
Hope This Helps! Rich
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Thanks! I added it to the web site.

The one in the patent has a screw in mouthpiece, it's possible that it's missing from the one on my site, I'll ask the owner if the open end is threaded.

If it was set down in an ashtray, it wouldn't matter if it was on its side or not, I don't think it was meant to be put down on a table, same with the old cigarette holders.

I'll also ask how big the hole is, the patent mentions "a number of holes", the owner mentioned "a hole" in an email, but may have mistyped.

I think that cigar holder is the correct answer but will be happy to look at any evidence that points in a different direction, I can't think of anything else that it could be used for. I'll let everyone know when I hear back from the owner.
Rob
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On 1/28/11 8:54 PM, Rob H. wrote:

With a trumpet mouthpiece, I have found it easy to suck air against resistance with my lips in rather than around a mouthpiece.
45,215 (1864) is an earlier patent. It has no bulb to collect liquids. It has a place for a piece of sponge soaked in camphor, a sort of menthol filter.
Your patent says one advantage is that because the smoke is drawn from near the burning tip, the rest of the cigar is not spoiled if you decide to save it.
I think that's the big advantage of the mystery item. In addition, the large tube would cool the smoke. Any condensate could easily be wiped out of a tube that large, long before there was enough to run. So who needs a bulb or a sponge?
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If anyone happens to have the book "Mikatin" by Juha Vartiainen, item number 371 in it is this cigar holder. The title on the cover is actually "M?katin", it's an excellent 'what is it?' book from Finland, but hard to find in the U.S. The photo in the book makes the holder look a little different than the one on my site, in the book the black stem looks long and thin, about 1/4" diameter, with a small round hole in the end, similar to what you might find in a pipe mouthpiece.
The shadow on the photo on my site makes the stem look thicker, and wider at the end. I can't post the photo in the book because of copyright issues, but I'm sure that most people who saw it would agree that the small hole in the mouthpiece would work well for smoking a cigar with this holder.
Rob
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On 1/28/11 5:33 PM, Rob H. wrote:

Here the DOT talks about maintaining trails by splitting rock with drills and wedges.
http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/fspubs/84232602/page03.htm
It mentions shale, shist, sandstone, limestone, marble, and harder rocks. The metal missing from 2152 makes me wonder if it's a screw wedge for splitting some kinds of rock.
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Sounds reasonable, I'll add this to my list of possible answers. I think this one is going to hard to nail down, not really expecting to get a final answer for it.
Rob
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