What is it? Set 424

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Automatic Bombing Computer attatchment for the Norden bombsight, known to the Army Air Forces as the Automatic Bombing Computer and to the Navy as Low Altitude Bombing Attachment.
image is third from bottom of page
Reply to
Ran Garoo
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2455 Periscope 2456 Brush cleaner 2457 Corn drying racks? 2458 Pocket farrier's tool? 2459 Scribing tool for wood turning? 2460 Part of a planimeter?
Carl G.
Reply to
Carl G.
Whadaya expect with artists?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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Been using one of these as a parts washer with carb cleaner, always thought the handle was a bit strange.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
I thought the handle was modelled after a Filipino IUD contraceptive? Or was that Japanese? I can't remember.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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The handle holds the brush handles when you force them in the spirals.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2455) Too much image data lost to jpeg compression for me to have a clear enough view to be sure, and a view from each end would help, too. But I'm going to assume that the pivot is also a means for feeding something in -- a gas fuel, or a very high frequency RF signal. The handle allows it to be swiveled to point at something. If a fuel gas, to play the flame across that something. If RF (microwave region) it could serve to point an antenna at a similarly equipped station, or to survey where a signal is coming from.
A view from the handle end would show whether there was an aperture and fitting for feeding something in there, and the other end would show whether there was an opening for something to exit or enter. I rather doubt that it is a fuel torch, because I see no way to separately feed air or oxygen in to get a balanced flame.
And less jpeg compression would allow me to see whether the center of the pivot mounting had an RF connector in it, or simply threads for mounting it to something.
2456) Not sure whether this is for cooking or for solvent cleaning though I lean towards for solvent cleaning of something like watch parts. The parts, after dipping (and likely ultrasonic cleaning) could be hung from the spring at the top to drip back into the cleaning pot.
2457) Looks like one of those nasty strips that at least the Brits thrown across a road to stop a runaway car. What is shown is only a small part of the chain which could be formed, since it is obvious that similar groupings could be coupled to what is shown to make it long enough to reach across any road at need.
2458) No clue at all. Is the end of the hook sharpened, or dull, which cold determine whether it is to be used as a chisel/scraper or as a lever to pry something out/apart.
2459) This looks like a tool to scribe a line at a fixed distance below the center of the end of some workpiece -- likely cylindrical or at worst, square.
The right angle point at the end of the longest piece is pushed into the center of the end of the workpiece, and the rest is pivoted around that.
The diameter of the workpiece can be somewhat accommodated by the three pivot points for the scribing arm, and by letting it trail behind the upper arm accomodation for smaller changes in diameter may be made.
2460) Is this flat on the bottom so it could be placed on a chart?
Is it secured to the wood by the bright screw visible above and a little to the left of the dial?
It looks like some form of navigation calculating instrument, with provisions for cross winds or currents (at about any angle), variable drag, and many other features.
Whether for aircraft or marine use, I don't know.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
"Mike Marlow" on Fri, 20 Jan 2012 00:11:52 -0500 typed >> I'm amateur at this, and my greatest respect to you. Truly
You get paid for this?
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Gunner Asch on Thu, 19 Jan 2012 22:22:17 -0800 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
Its a Marine Leaverrite, if I'm not mistaken.
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Hmmm...if the work is already on potter's wheel, a comb (or lots of other things that are easier to clean) might suffice?
Reply to
Bill
No luck yet identifying this device but the rest of the answers can be found here:
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Thanks to everyone who helped solve the other two mystery items this week.
Rob
Reply to
Rob H.
We'll all be disapponted, if you don't.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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Storm> I'm amateur at this, and my greatest respect to you. Truly
Professional? Heck - I was only foolin'. Now I have to be professional?
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Hi Rob, coming late this week, answers already published, i see that item 2459 is still unresolved. It miust be some kind of a cat- carrier...
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greetings from germany
(no, i am joking, i love cats)
Reply to
Christian Stüben
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That's a classic! If anyone ever makes a real one of those maybe I'll post it on the site.
Reply to
Rob H.
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In 1978 me and a mate (both 18 years old at the time) went on holiday from England on our motorbikes to tour France. For both of us it was our first holiday away from parents and a big adventure. We took an evening ferry from Portsmouth to Cherbourg, drove for an hour or so in the dark, found a field to put the tent up in overnight and set off properly next morning. Shortly afterwards at a tricky junction my idiot friend who was more a car driver than a full time competent biker failed to stop in time, lost it and crashed into the back of me, wrecking his front forks which bent like bananas when his front wheel hit my rear one but fortunately doing no damage to my bike or me. A French woman in the house he crashed outside heard it happen and ran out to help us. My friend had injured his hand a bit when he fell off, his bike was unrideable and they put us up over the weekend while he got better.
We set off again, both of us now just on my bike on the Monday, toured France for the remaining 10 days and collected his poorly bike in a van when we got back. At dinner that night they showed us a comedy drawing of what was labelled a Porte Chien Belge (Belgian dog carrier). The French look on the Belgians a bit like the English look on the Irish. Their hard of thinking cousins.
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So that's at least how old that joke is. Happy memories though.
Reply to
Dave Baker

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