Workshop Practice


I was going to add some of the workshop Practice books to my
collection, but wanted get feedback first. Particularly suggestions
for the best ones, because I'm sure all of them are not great books.
I've read that s possible problem is that they speak in metric and
some are outdated, or geared toward the UK reader. Nevertheless any
advice would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
Reply to
Searcher7
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A number of them are available on rapidshare.com in at least one location but you'll have to look for them. I know the direct link but suspect their presence there is a breach of copyright so won't post it. I've bought the "Gears and Gear Cutting" by Ivan law on the strength of what I've seen posted about it in the past and on the strength of what I saw from the rapidshare download I bought the "Electric Motors" book by Jim Cox. In the UK at least they're available quite cheaply, I don't know what they cost in the US.
Reply to
David Billington
I have #2, Vertical Milling, and agree that it's too British in choice of machines and projects, mainly steam loco parts. It does cover the basics reasonably well, though, and gives an overview of making lashed- up fixtures for unusual jobs.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I have 10 of them. I like the electroplating, electric motors, drills taps and dies and heat treatment the best.
Reply to
Michael Koblic
======= I have Law's book on gears, and it is excellent.
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Sandhu's spindle book is interesting, but I found it to be of little practical value in the stuff I used to do.
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Tubal Cain's book was helpful when I didn't have access to a vertical mill.
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Three books that are on sale at Enco will be of more use for basic home shop machining in the US are:
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You can also get the workshop practice series at
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also need a copy of machinery's handbook -- new is good if you are into cnc/metric but the older ones emphasize manual machining topics. One used book source that I have had luck with is
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*listing*titleBe careful when you order to not get stuck with S&H charges.
also see
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let the group know what you get and how useful you find it.
-- Unka George (George McDuffee) .............................. The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there. L. P. Hartley (1895-1972), British author. The Go-Between, Prologue (1953).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
I have Ivan Laws book on gearing and one on lathe work holding. I'm not sure if Pentagrids book on motors is part of the series but if it is, I'll recommend all three.
Screw cutting on the lathe is worthwhile also. Just remembered I had that one also.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
I have a bunch of 'em, if anything I find they're not metric enough (rather than models etc. I tend to work on japanese motorcycles), but the principles haven't changed so much and you can always figure the conversions if you have to. There's definitely an emphasis on model engineering and "traditional" practices (no CNC / CAD / CAM for a start), but most of the tools and techniques scale pretty well - lucky, as my old deflicted eyes don't cope so well at small scales ;)
Ones I'd recommend are the ones on heat treatment, milling in the lathe (until I can afford a bridgie/clone), screwcutting and "workholding in the lathe", the tool and cutter sharpening book's good (and has a few plans for useful grinder accessories and such), following on from those the book on dividing's pretty good too, or for beginners the basic benchwork and various hints + tips books are very useful.
HTH, Dave H.
Reply to
Dave H.
Second that Wes! Esp. if you're talking about Ivan Laws little book in which he details duplication of gear surfaces from common end mill radii.
Bob Swinney
Searcher7 wrote:
I have Ivan Laws book on gearing and one on lathe work holding. I'm not sure if Pentagrids book on motors is part of the series but if it is, I'll recommend all three.
Screw cutting on the lathe is worthwhile also. Just remembered I had that one also.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Robert Swinney
I've got a number of them, some bought back when they were $5, some recently. There are a number that reference older British hobby lathes that are probably long since scrap, but I've gotten a few kinks out of those back when I didn't have a lot of equipment. There are a couple of vendors off Amazon that have them fairly reasonable, $6-7, rather than the $20+ that Amazon wants. I've got one on shapers, one on small foundry practice, the gear-making one and Sparey's Amateur's Lathe that have been the most useful. The one on home shop milling was a bit disappointing. Only the most recent ones are purely metric, doesn't bother me, I can convert either way. There's a recent offering aimed at the Chinese 7x lathe that's been very useful, not one of that series, but still useful. There was one on threads that had just about every thread listed that was used world-wide, lotsa tables. One of the things about the whole bunch is they're more or less oriented toward the live steam crowd, locomotives and steam tractors. Some of the older ones show making things you can buy off the shelf for cheap, now. If I need Morse shanks, I'll go get some, not spend my time setting up to turn expensive stock down. Same with some of the clamps and such, better stuff available now. If your time was worth nothing and all you had was some scrap steel, then it might be worth doing some of the shop equipment projects. When I was a starving student, I did some of those.
Stan
Reply to
stans4
Thanks everyone.
I have about 20 books in my machining collection now.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Reply to
Searcher7
send a valid email addy to gunnerasch AT hotmail dot com and Ill send you some Ebooks on machining/welding etc etc./
What is the maximum file size you can receive?
Gunner
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
I have no idea. What titles are you referring to?
I think I have everything covered as far as books are concerned. Between the forums and the books I already have it'll take years to get through everything, which is why I was only searching for the best titles.
So I made up my list after reading reviews at the forums and Amazon.com.
I don't have any welding books, but I don't see welding in my immediate future. I did some in college though, but I dropped out due to burn out. So thus went my dream of being a mechanical engineer.
I'm a lot more disciplined now, but have a hearing problem, so even if I could afford to return it would be useless.
Thanks.
Darren Harris Staten Island, New York.
Reply to
Searcher7
Ive got about humm...20 gigs of machining and machining related books on the harddrive(s), and about the same for welding and welding related books. Most of them are scans of actual books, everything from the Audel Machinist books to Machiniest Handbook (of multiple years) and so forth.
One of the newsgroups I watch regularly is alt.binaries.e-book.technical
Floods of various technical related ebooks are presented for download, currently medical, amature radio, and computer IRRC and I have other sources as well, including the Gutenburg Project and so forth.
Id say right off hand..Ive got 10,000 downloadable books in electronic format..all legal of course..indeedy..oh yes indeed! on various topics that Ive found to be of interest or handy to have as reference. Since I have about 6000 printed books in the library with hummm 10% of those being technical related..having ebooks minimizes the space requirements ...I dont need to fill 2 rooms of my home with book shelves.
The biggest problem Im having at the moment..is finding a decent library program that will function to keep track of my ebooks and is free.
Gunner
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Gunner, I ran across a couple of organizers recently, free downloads, but I have not evaluated. Have you played with any?
Rex
Reply to
RBnDFW
Ive played with Calibre..which was ok...
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The Sony one is ok...but tends to puke ..I cant remember why at this moment, google it. Its quite powerful, but is oriented towards buying books
Im currently installing as I type this yet another one
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Ill let you know how it turns out.
Gunner
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Oh..before I forget..here are some book sources that are free
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Some decent links....
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And so forth.
the newsgroup alt.binaries.e-book.technical (check spelling) is a very good source. Not all ebooks found there are...ah..legally uploaded..ahum. Many are current versions, under copyright and so forth.
That being said..they are free. So use as your consinous dictates.
Ebook Readers on the other hand...can be a bit of a choice.
I use Mobipocket, Microsoft Ebook Reader (free of course) and Foxit PDF Reader. There are several decent readers out there that will read more than a few formats......
You may wish to read this first of all...
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And this
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If you wish to read ebooks OFF from your computer on a portable device...
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Prices are already below those listed..some cases significantly
Btw..Ive handled and read from the new version of thos one..and its actually quite nice.
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Just a few heads up and some mumbling on my part....
Gunner
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
It was simply another bullshit link to the Sony reader. Damnit
Deleted.
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Hey All,
Sorry, and I hope this doesn't interfere TOO MUCH with the latest "You're a bigger dummy than me!" crap.
It's just one month until Cabin Fever, Jan 14, 2011 for "THE" auction, plus Jan. 15 &16 for exhibits, at the Toyota Arena in downtown York, Pennsylvania.
See you there??
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
Reply to
Brian Lawson

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