WW2 interesting trivia


You might enjoy this from Col D. G. Swinford, USMC, Ret., and history
buff.
You would really have to dig deep to get this kind of ringside seat to
history:
1. The first German serviceman killed in WW II was killed by the
Japanese (China, 1937).
The first American serviceman killed was killed by the Russians
(Finland 1940); highest ranking American killed was Lt. Gen Lesley
McNair, killed by the US Army Air Corps. So much for allies.
2. The youngest US serviceman was 12 year old Calvin Graham, USN. He
was wounded and given a Dishonorable Discharge for lying about his
age. His benefits were later restored by act of Congress.
3. At the time of Pearl Harbor, the top US Navy command was called
CINCUS (pronounced 'sink us'); the shoulder patch of the US Army's
45th Infantry division was the Swastika, and Hitler's private train
was named 'Amerika.' All three were soon changed for PR purposes.
4. More US servicemen died in the Air Corps than the Marine Corps.
[Actually the 8th Air Force alone suffered about 5,000 more KIA than
the entire Marine Corps in WW2.) While completing the required 30
missions, an airman's chance of being killed was 71%.
5. Generally speaking, there was no such thing as an average fighter
pilot. You were either an ace or a target. For instance, Japanese
Ace Hiroyoshi Nishizawa shot down over 80 planes. He died while a
passenger on a cargo plane.
6. It was a common practice on fighter planes to load every 5th round
with a tracer round to aid in aiming. This was a mistake. Tracers
had different ballistics, so (at long range) if your tracers were
hitting the target, 80% of your rounds were missing. Worse yet
tracers, instantly told your enemy he was under fire and from which
direction. Worst of all was the practice of loading a string of
tracers at the end of the belt to tell you that you were
out of ammo. This was definitely not something you wanted to tell the
enemy.
Units that stopped using tracers saw their success rate nearly
double and their loss rate go down.
Here's something related from 5th SF, Detachment B-52's --- Tips of
the Trade
item #32: "Tracers work both ways".
7. When allied armies reached the Rhine, the first thing men did was
pee in it. This was pretty universal from the lowest private to
Winston Churchill (who made a big show of it) and Gen. Patton (who had
himself photographed in the act).
8. German Me-264 bombers were capable of bombing New York City, but
they decided it wasn't worth the effort.
9. German submarine U-1206 was sunk by a malfunctioning toilet.
10. Among the first 'Germans' captured at Normandy were several
Koreans. They had been forced to fight for the Japanese Army until
they were captured by the Russians, and forced to fight for the
Russian Army until they were captured by the Germans, and forced to
fight for the German Army until they were captured by the US Army.
11. Following a massive naval bombardment, 35,000 United States and
Canadian troops stormed ashore at Kiska, in the Aleutian Islands .
21 troops were killed in the assault on the island. It could have
been worse if there had been any Japanese on the island.
12. The last Marine killed in WW2 was killed by a can of spam. He was
on the ground as a POW in Japan when rescue flights dropping food and
supplies came over, the package came apart in the air and a stray can
of spam hit him and killed him.
"The socialist movement takes great pains to circulate frequently new labels for its ideally constructed state.
Each worn-out label is replaced by another which raises hopes of an ultimate solution of the insoluble basic
problem of Socialism, until it becomes obvious that nothing has been changed but the name.
The most recent slogan is "State Capitalism."[Fascism] It is not commonly realized that this covers nothing more
than what used to be called Planned Economy and State Socialism, and that State Capitalism, Planned Economy,
and State Socialism diverge only in non-essentials from the "classic" ideal of egalitarian Socialism. - Ludwig von Mises (1922)
Reply to
Gunner Asch
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Oh indeed. But the article was about WW2
Gunner
"The socialist movement takes great pains to circulate frequently new labels for its ideally constructed state. Each worn-out label is replaced by another which raises hopes of an ultimate solution of the insoluble basic problem of Socialism, until it becomes obvious that nothing has been changed but the name. The most recent slogan is "State Capitalism."[Fascism] It is not commonly realized that this covers nothing more than what used to be called Planned Economy and State Socialism, and that State Capitalism, Planned Economy, and State Socialism diverge only in non-essentials from the "classic" ideal of egalitarian Socialism. - Ludwig von Mises (1922)
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Mighty dangerous firing tracer from the M14 or in my case..the early version of the XM-21
Shrug
"The socialist movement takes great pains to circulate frequently new labels for its ideally constructed state. Each worn-out label is replaced by another which raises hopes of an ultimate solution of the insoluble basic problem of Socialism, until it becomes obvious that nothing has been changed but the name. The most recent slogan is "State Capitalism."[Fascism] It is not commonly realized that this covers nothing more than what used to be called Planned Economy and State Socialism, and that State Capitalism, Planned Economy, and State Socialism diverge only in non-essentials from the "classic" ideal of egalitarian Socialism. - Ludwig von Mises (1922)
Reply to
Gunner Asch
True. Its far more dangerous to the shooter. The Target is a foregone conclusion. and is the Enemy. Of no value at all..... alive.
"The socialist movement takes great pains to circulate frequently new labels for its ideally constructed state. Each worn-out label is replaced by another which raises hopes of an ultimate solution of the insoluble basic problem of Socialism, until it becomes obvious that nothing has been changed but the name. The most recent slogan is "State Capitalism."[Fascism] It is not commonly realized that this covers nothing more than what used to be called Planned Economy and State Socialism, and that State Capitalism, Planned Economy, and State Socialism diverge only in non-essentials from the "classic" ideal of egalitarian Socialism. - Ludwig von Mises (1922)
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Truly fascinating, I hope that it is true. I especially liked the part about the Koreans.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus20545
It has all the "feel" of internet legend. However, I could not find it on the web.
I wonder with the 12 year old. He was wounded and discharged. Did they have to wound him also? I'd have guessed just write him up and ship him home. Did the court sentence him to be shot or some thing?
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus
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Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Gunner Asch fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Gunner, I don't know how it was in WWII, but by the time Viet Nam came around, they'd fixed that ballistics problem.
All we shot in both the M-60s and the Browning .50s was 4-and-1 ball and tracer. I can guarantee you that out to about 500 yards (maybe 700), they both held target on the tracer rounds, perfectly.
We had a lot of 'directed fire' kills to attest to that.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Guess I'm lucky my father was an honest man... WWII was the last time a non collage graduate could become a combat pilot. (Sergeant pilot program) He qualified and went to cadet school. Did well until the very last item before moving to flight training, an interview with a psychologist. He noted others spent widely varying time being interviewed.
His turn finally came and the very first question was "Why did you join the Army Air Force?" His answer of "To keep out of the infantry Sir!" was apparently not what they wanted to hear as there were no further questions. Ended up being a propeller mechanic in the Pacific theater.
Reply to
William Bagwell
That agrees with my personal experience with M-60 and M-14.
And - fighters had to be at least that close to the target to hit anything. So longer range shooting doesn't really happen.
Reply to
Richard
He was wounded in combat during the Battle of Guadalcanal and received the Bronze Star, for giving assistance to other wounded, and a Purple Heart.
Subsequently, apparently, his mother notified the Navy of his age and he (again apparently) was court marshaled for lying and confined to the Brig and later received a dishonorable discharge.
When he reached 17 years of age he re-enlisted in the Marines - which seems a bit strange given his pervious dishonorable discharge - and after 3 years he broke his back and was discharged again.
Reply to
John B.
Kinda depends on which end you are looking at, doesn't it?
Reply to
Richard
Wing-mounted guns toed inward to converge a few hundred yards out, then diverge out of the gunsight. Many of the great aces were relatively poor shots who won by outflying the enemy well enough to stay close on their six.
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"Every pilot who I've heard express an opinion says that the easiest/best way to shoot down an enemy aircraft was at close range and zero deflection."
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
My Daddy was a WAC recruiter...I often wonder how he received his Purple Heart???
Reply to
Tom Gardner
I've fired several thousand tracers from an M-60. Maybe I should have asked if it was safe first?
Reply to
Richard
Should you? How much yellow/green return tracers did you get?
Gunner
"The socialist movement takes great pains to circulate frequently new labels for its ideally constructed state. Each worn-out label is replaced by another which raises hopes of an ultimate solution of the insoluble basic problem of Socialism, until it becomes obvious that nothing has been changed but the name. The most recent slogan is "State Capitalism."[Fascism] It is not commonly realized that this covers nothing more than what used to be called Planned Economy and State Socialism, and that State Capitalism, Planned Economy, and State Socialism diverge only in non-essentials from the "classic" ideal of egalitarian Socialism. - Ludwig von Mises (1922)
Reply to
Gunner Asch
They certainly can! And those suckers are fast too!
"The socialist movement takes great pains to circulate frequently new labels for its ideally constructed state. Each worn-out label is replaced by another which raises hopes of an ultimate solution of the insoluble basic problem of Socialism, until it becomes obvious that nothing has been changed but the name. The most recent slogan is "State Capitalism."[Fascism] It is not commonly realized that this covers nothing more than what used to be called Planned Economy and State Socialism, and that State Capitalism, Planned Economy, and State Socialism diverge only in non-essentials from the "classic" ideal of egalitarian Socialism. - Ludwig von Mises (1922)
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Its been my experience... those..you never see. Of course..I was seldom flying into a cloud of them. Shrug
"The socialist movement takes great pains to circulate frequently new labels for its ideally constructed state. Each worn-out label is replaced by another which raises hopes of an ultimate solution of the insoluble basic problem of Socialism, until it becomes obvious that nothing has been changed but the name. The most recent slogan is "State Capitalism."[Fascism] It is not commonly realized that this covers nothing more than what used to be called Planned Economy and State Socialism, and that State Capitalism, Planned Economy, and State Socialism diverge only in non-essentials from the "classic" ideal of egalitarian Socialism. - Ludwig von Mises (1922)
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Never saw any yellow. But the green once can get real big!
Reply to
Richard
Since we were most often flying at the time, the tracers make the most beautiful curves. (well, so did mine, but I actually like mine!) It looks like they are going somewhere else, then they slowly curve in toward you and pick up speed.
It takes a while to learn which ones have your name on them...
Reply to
Richard
Richard on Sat, 28 Sep 2013 15:28:53 -0500 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
As my Dad would say: It is not the one with your name on it you need to worry about, it is the one marked "Occupant" or "Boxholder local" or "To whom it may concern". -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
Reply to
pyotr filipivich

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