440 3Phase Controller

I have a controller that I want to hook up to a 3phase motor which is currently working without one. The problem I have is I bought the
controller off of ebay without a manual and I know my motor has one wire that is 220 and two that are 110 with a ground to the motor. My controller has L1, L2, and L3 with corresponding T1, T2 and T3. My question is which of these is the 220 and which are the 110 as I do not want to blow the controller out.
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Try rcm instead of ukrme. I think your motor belongs on the left side of the pond, not the right :-)
regards Mark Rand RTFM
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wrote:

The motor you have described is a very strange beast. More info is needed.
Is your motor at present running from 415V 3 phase, 240V 3 phase or 240V single phase?
Also have you looked for a web site - pretty well all reputable manufacturers post downloadable manuals.
Jim
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It is a 440 3 Phase with three wires, one is 220., and two are 110 thus the 440. The ground just runs to the outside of the motor. The controller has a manual showing all three wires but none with the 220 wire marked and I don't want to hook it up wrong and blow the controller. One side of the wrap on the motor is 220 and the other is 110. The controller is made for that but as I said it does not list it. It is a Baldor ID15V410ER controller that I bought on ebay.
Thanks,
Rod snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Rod wrote:

Is it possible that Rod's motor is a dual voltage single phase motor with split phase starting? That's the only way I can think to explain the mention of both 110 V and 220 V.
Rod, if you can post a picture of the motor, and in particular the data plate, it would help us to figure out what kind of motor it is.
Best wishes,
Chris
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Aah that answers the question. It's a crappy American motor designed to run [ or not run ] on their system.
You need one phase at 240v from Georgia, one 110v split phase from Montana and a 480 volt phase from Washington State. Earth should be fine from any of the lower States.
.

-- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
Visit the new Model Engineering adverts page at:- http://www.homeworkshop.org.uk /
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wrote:

It sounds as if you have an American motor running from USA type power supplies - because you posted to a UK group I assumed European standards.
You have a straightforward 3 phase machine that can be connected directly to the T1,T2,T3 outputs of a VFD.in ANY convenient order. Reverse any pair of wires to reverse the direction of rotation.
THe 110V, 220V, labels are not multiple voltage ratings of the motor but simply relate to the way the motor is normally connected to a common type of USA 3phase supply. This is a 3 phase 220V supply which has no neutral but the centre tap of one pair of lines is grounded. The voltage with respect to ground for these two wires is 110V-0-110v hence the labels. This arrangment permits these two wires plus ground to be used for domestic 110V/220V single phase outlets.
The way you have described the labels indicates a machine connected for 220V operation. Dual voltage 220V/440V motors exist but require a rather complicated reconnection of 9 separate wires.
Jim
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Oohh You are naughty John.
Just because our friend does not understand that you cannot simply add the voltages together for 3 phase!!
I would suggest he gets some professional advise.
Regards Ian C

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Not to forget some extenion cord. Maybe 100km to fine tune the phase.
Nick
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100km will never work in the USA. You're going to need a 62 mile one.
--
Nigel

When the only tools you have are a Bridgeport, a CNC Taig Mill, a Colchester
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Rod wrote:

I think some more info is needed - you are running right now off three phase at 440V and you have the 3 wires connected to which terminals ??
I've just hooked up a 2 to 3 phase inverter, and can echo the other guys in saying that what you say you have seems real strange. I am no expert but if I write some bunkum it may trigger others. You see I have this theory....
My theory is that the US is 110volt single phase and 220volt three phase, so the inverters being sold to us home mechanics in the UK are designed for three phase US to three phase US frequency control. However if they have only two input wires at 220volts it doesn't matter as they turn it to DC and have big capacitors to smooth it out. So here in the UK we can use them for 2 phase to 3 phase conversion (at 220V).
Now a 3 phase motor has three connections (plus earth) and in the UK takes ~440V with normal wiring (thats 'star' format), but some can also be wired in delta fomat which makes it take 220V (still on three phases, still three wires, still the same power). So a US 3-phase motor would take 220V in star format, and 110 volt in delta format (still on three phases, still three wires, still the same power).
I wonder if you have a US 3-phase motor which can be wired in star or delta format, so that would take either 220V 3-phase on 3 terminals, or 110V 3-phase on 3 terminals (it is probably the same three terminals but the motor connector wires would need moving). But you say you are running NOW on 3 phase 440V ? And only have 220V and 110volt terminals ! Does not compute !
OK so thats the end of my theory as to why your motor talks about 110, 220 and earth - but as far as I know you need three terminals for either 220 or 110 v not a mixture, and if you are running it at 440V then I don't know why it hasn't melted.
Steve R
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Now I'm really confused. :-))
One correction: If it can run in star and delta, it has six wires.
And what I really don't understand at all: The OP says some windings do have connection to earth. That would be a clear reason for scrapping the motor.
Nick
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Nick Mller wrote:

Seems the star and delta ones by design usually have six terminals, you decide which three to use. I have a star motor I have converted to delta, so I just have three terminals, and have broken into the star point on the winding to bring out the leads to convert it to delta. Sorry for the confusion.
I am still mystified how a motor with three terminals marked 220V, 110V, 110V (plus ground) can be currently running on 440V three phase !
Steve R
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Nick Mller wrote:

I think if you substituted "plus" or "together with" in place of "with" in his original post, the meaning would have been less ambiguous. I am pretty sure that he just means there is a ground as well as the wires which connect to the windings.
Best wishes,
Chris
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