CAD Packages for the Occaisonal User

I've got a copy of TurboCad Deluxe (V16) and find it not at all easy to use - the sporadic use worsens the problem as much needs to be relearnt even
for basic sketches. I first got access to a PC in 1982/83 so my problem is not "new technology", I'm finding I can produce better sketches in PowerPoint that I can in TC. Technical drawing though is not my thing.
I don't need three 3d capability , just a tool that's intuitive to use and I can create accurately dimensioned 2D sketches I can print off in A4, take into the workshop and start cutting metal...
Whilst the stuff I'm doing is only simple, it's complex enough for a software tool to make life a lot easier!
Any thoughts or recommends?
TIA Steve
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Steve wrote:

First of all, don't believe anybody who claims that CAD is quick and easy to learn. It just isn't! BUT, as long as you are motivated, the learning curve is definitely worth climbing. I first learnt with a DOS program called EasyCAD (2D only). I could use it pretty well after a couple of weeks hard graft, and found it really useful, but eventually realized its limitations when I started to use dimensions in a big way. That's when I switched to an early version of TurboCAD which I found anything but intuitive, but persevered and found it much more useful. When the 3D facilities were introduced I started to use them too, and now find that its quicker and easier to use CAD than an envelope back and pencil. I had a brief flirtation with SolidWorks, which I liked but couldn't afford, so I've remained faithful to TurboCAD which I now use for all my design work. I think you would find a copy of TurboCAD Pro 11 cheaper and more useful than a V16 Deluxe, but since you already have DeLuxe then you should certainly start climbing the learning curve - it'll be time well spent and you won't regret it.
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Regards, Gary Wooding
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DoubleCAD might worth a go. Opens and saves file in AutoCAD format too.
http://www.doublecad.com/Products/DoubleCADXT/tabid/1100/Default.aspx
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DoubleCAD might be worth a go. Opens and saves file in AutoCAD (DWG) format too.
http://www.doublecad.com/Products/DoubleCADXT/tabid/1100/Default.aspx
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wrote:

I use Micro$oft Visio Pro for all my engineering drawings, shed and house extension plans and even garden plans. If there's anyone in the family that counts as a student, then it's £131. The full price is £472.
You can download a trial version from their website.
Mark Rand RTFM
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On Thu, 10 Dec 2009 18:39:50 +0000, Mark Rand wrote:

Qcad works for me - comes with most linux distros and is enough for my needs which aren't complex.
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Neil
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On Thu, 10 Dec 2009 18:39:50 +0000, Mark Rand

I have the standard version of Visio, but haven't investigated its use for engineering CAD - does it do dimensioning and such?
The package I have used for a long while now is AutoSketch (same stable as AutoCad but simpler and a lot cheaper) - it works well for me. Not cheap to buy though.
Regards, Tony
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wrote:

I used to use Autosketch probably in the days of W95! I found it easy to use, however these days I use Solidedge which is a very powerful (free) 2D package, Well worth trying to get a copy. I find it very intuitive. I have also got the (free) Alibre for 3D but I have not spent too much time with it. Solidedge 3D is excellent and again intuitive however it costs! Visio I have but I do not like it except for flow diagrams and the occasional pneumatic circuit. Electrical schematics are still completed with ORCAD circa 1989 which still runs on XP! I think that I still have the original 5 1/4 floppies that it came on!
Richard
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The pro version certainly does all of the normal engineering drawing dimensioning. It'll even do areas of closed shapes. Templates inclise fastenings, springs, a good selection of bearings, valves and more. (all you need is someone that's got the same year as your copy to blag the templates!)
Mark Rand RTFM
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Steve wrote:

Someone else has said that CAD isn't easy to learn. That was my experience but also I found that it was worth the effort.

I use QCad, which is free. I don't know whether it's available for MS Windows, I use it in Linux.
Stuart
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Yes it is available for windoze. I've got a copy running on a vista laptop. I can't claim to have used it much as I must admit I don't find it easy to understand.
Cheers
Guy
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