Distinguish brass from bronze

I have a variety of yellow metal bars, and wish to machine a new bush for a breadmaker. How can I distinguish which is bronze? Does it matter?
JW˛
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JW˛ wrote:

Assuming you have some bronze in amongst them then the bronzes are likely to more red or copper like than the really yellow brasses. Does it matter? Well bronze will be harder wearing (on steel)than brass but for light domestic use then possibly not. Whilst you are at it make 2 bushes of whatever you have to hand then the first won't wear out until you've lost the spare one!!
HTH Bob
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What an excellent idea! Like always carrying an umbrella so that it won't rain. You won't lose the spare bush if you put it in a safe place. Unless you forget where that it!
Henry
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Dragon wrote:

Similar to the recommendation from the days when airliners were being bombed: it's safer to take your own bomb on board because the chance of there being two on the same aircraft is negligible. ;-)
Dave
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Not sure I go along with that....... but it is a good idea :)
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Which reminds me about always finding something you've lost in the very last place you look.
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But that is logical as you stop lokking once you've found it. This is no place for logic, it spoils the fun!
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Jack:
Brass is very much a yellow/gold colour while the bronzes tend to be darker/redder. Gunmetal is in between....
The material spec also affects the perceived colouring, cast sticks/bars tend to be duller while extruded/drawn bars are shinier, for want of a better expression.
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel http://www.stationary-engine.co.uk http://www.oldengine.co.uk
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When turned, Brass swaff comes off as a shower of very small particles
Bronze tends to come off as a single long piece.
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Depends on the bronze and the cutting conditions. With some it's quite easy to get the same shower of small 'needles'.
Tim
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==Thanks to all for the info. I used the piece which seemed to be the reddish-brownish-darkish-est, and noted the chips. They varied between fine particles and flakes, but on parting-off, they were distinct flakes, so I felt vaguely reassured that it was a piece of bronze. Thanks again
JW˛ ==
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For your further information on brasses and bronze, bronze is a much superior metal as far as wearing is concerned. From a decent cut the swarf will usually curl like small springs which will be quite tough. Be careful when reaming as the reamer may sieze unless there is a very minimal amount to remove. Gunmetal has a slight goldish tinge. It machines easily except for drilling where it may snatch in the drill in. It is used for steam engine boiler parts as it does not "de- zincify" due to steam and pressure. Phosfor Bronze is even tougher than bronze and even darker in colour especially when it ozidises with age, and correspondingly tougher to machine. Always use the sharpest tools on all these metals as blunt tools will cause trouble. Hop[e this is of help. Tom Oliver
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tomol wrote:

Thank you for this information. I have stored it away for future use. What is the best method of marking metal stock to indicate its material and grade? Standard colour code? Stamping ID marks on butt end?
JW˛
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    Personally, I think simple is best. I bought half a dozen small tins of 'Humbrol' model enamel and invented my own colour code system. It only takes a few seconds to dab material with a cotton bud dipped in the paint.
    It just needs a bit of discipline to remember to mark stuff as soon as it arrives, and before I forget what I bought, and only to cut off from the unpainted end!
    From previous traffic on this subject, I think it was generally concluded that there was no universal system anyway.
    YMMV.
--
Chris Edwards (in deepest Dorset) "....there *must* be an easier way!"

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I use a sharpie and write on it in several places (when I remember...)
Dave
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