Fingery picturebox (and turning result)



Almost any low end snapshot camera will do that. Most have a macro setting. My low end one is an Olympus 210. It has a macro mode that is good enough to photograph bugs on the windscreen of my van. It also has a large LCD screen to make life easier. My DSLR (also an Olympus) is not always convenient to carry. The little one has 7.1 megapixels, and lives in my pants pocket.
Steve R.
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Austin Shackles wrote:

Talking of such fingery picturebox (aka digital camera) thingies, can you - or anyone - recommend a cheap-ish camera which will take pictures of real-life things sized between a sheet of A4 paper and a postage stamp?
Don't need loadsa pixels, I mainly want to put piccys of some stuff I've done on the internet, but my present camera tends to take blurred piccys of things in that size range, no matter what I try.
I'm not a photographer-type, and I'm not interested in learning about f-stops, exposures, apertures, or any of that rubbish.
Ta,
-- Peter Fairbrother
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Peter Fairbrother wrote:

Depends on los of things, like your definition of cheapish. I'm luck enough to have both a compact (fits in the pocket) and a DSLR (far more controllable). If I need close shots I can put a close up adapter (+3 dioptre lens) on the DSLR to focus closer and get a larger image. You could try holding one in front of a compact and see how it goes or make an adapter. Unfortunately most compacts seem to be auto focus only and might vary shot to shot, if you took the pictures on something like graph paper you could see how much depth of field you can get (if you put the camera on a tripod and force it somhow to do a longer exposure the lens aperture will be smaller with a greater dof). A bit of optics knowledge helps to find the new focus distance as in 1/f=1/u+1/v.
See http://www.hoya-online.co.uk/lst697.htm
They are silly prices, I reckon you could get one used from a camera shop for around 5 or equivalent
Hope that helps
--
"But it's nothing to worry about; it's all part of growing up and being
British."
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wrote:

Unfortunately, close-up lenses have less effect on a short focal length lens (as you will find in compact cameras) than on longer focal lenght lenses (100mm+ on a DSLR). So you would need significantly more than a +3 diopter lens (maybe upwards of ten times that) to make a worthwhile difference to close-up work on the average P&S camera.
There are plenty of digital cameras around that have in-built "macro" capability, but they tend not to be at the cheap end of the range, especially if you want manual control as well. Having said that, the Nikon Coolpix L19 and L20 focus down to 5cm (what this means in terms of the size of object that will fill the frame is something you'll have to figure out for yourself!) and cost around 85-100 street price. You don't get any manual control over focus or exposure, but on the other hand, it may well do the job. Best way is to go into Jessops and experiment with one and see what it can actually do - if they won't let you, there are other camera shops that will. It will also give you a chance to compare/contrast with other models and makes - the Jessops staff in my local branch are surprisingly clued up on their product line.
If you want something with more sophisticated exposure modes, including manual exposure control, then look at the Nikon Coolpix "P" series cameras - the P50 is the start of that range, street prices start at around 125.
As always, it is worth trying Ebay for older models. I have an old Nikon Coolpix 4500 that has manual focus and exposure control and a macro mode that focuses down to about 2cm; it is still a very useful camera & is what I use most of the time to take pics for magazine articles - I don't care if it gets greasy or whatever. There are a couple on the 'bay right now - items 200337679237 and 140318151409. Looks like they will go for ~50-60.
Regards, Tony
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In those dim & distant days when everything was in black & white, you used to be able to buy 'front and back' screw caps for storing filters. Basically, you screwed all the filters into a pile and protected each end with the 'front & back' caps.
mh
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On Tue, 12 May 2009 09:35:35 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

You can still get them - search for "stack cap" on Ebay.
Regards, Tony
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in

And you can still get them. A friend at work bought a couple of dozen filters off ebay for not very much and they arrived in a large tube. About 2 of the filters were useful as the rest could either be done digitally after taking or were daft things like starburst filters.
--
Graeme

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Yup. There isn't much that a filter can do that can't be digitally processed these days. Including the starburst stuff...
Regards, Tony
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