Installing Chinese Mill/Drill

As a novice I'm finding the instructions a bit complicated.
Can someone with more experience that I please explain the following
sentence:
"It is tighten the same time to fix the head if drilling and milling too
much"
Steve
Reply to
Steve
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Head clamp bolt -- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
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John Stevenson
Thanks John. Your Cantonese is clearly better than mine!
Steve
Reply to
Steve
Amazing what you can learn at the local Chinese chippy ;-)
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
It is hard to tell what it means because you havnt given any context
Perhaps it is saying not to overtighten the draw bar? Perhaps you ca give a little more information
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milgo
To be honest it wasn't meant to be that serious a post. JS had it in one, its related to the head clamp bolts, the previous sentence instructs that the head clamp bolts are to be released before moving the head, then clamped afterwards.
Despite the manual I've very pleased with the machine -
Hows the Taig coming on?
Steve
Reply to
Steve
What machine is it? The thread title isn't very specific ...
Reply to
Peter Fairbrother
Oh right, I did wonder after I had posted, heh. Yeah the taig is good I am just waiting for a milling vice now then I can start makin something. All the hardware is done and running smoothly. I have bee trying to get my head around the software as well. I think I hav decided on lightwave 3d for the CAD, powermill for the CAM and then us mach 1 for the controller software. Are you converting your import t cnc
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milgo
. I think I have
Perhaps you shouldn't shout too loudly about what pirated software you will be using, you never know who may read your posts.
Regards
Kevin
Reply to
Kevin Steele
A lot of work can be done by clamping directly to the bed - Have a look at "Milling a Complete Course" by Harold Hall.
All the hardware is done and running smoothly. I have been
Thinking about it, but time and cash means it won't be this year! Though I've worked out how to get stepper drives onto each axis. What I'm not sure how to do is to calculate the torque requirement then I can size the steppers. Playing with the new Mill, I can take 2mm bites 12mm deep with a 12 mm cutter off the edge of a block of decent cast iron without trouble (no vice used!) but how do I convert that into a torque value?
I've loaded the demo version of MACH2 on my PC and played with writing some part programmes, though I think JS has the right approach in using a DOS based controller since you can then use a low spec machine. The efficiency of using an XP machine as a 3 axis controller is very low it seems to me. I suspect a Z80 would eat the processing requirement!
Best Regards
Steve
Reply to
Steve
Hi Peter,
It's a WARCO Economy Mill, very similar to the Chester Eagle and I think the Axminster RF-25.
Current concern is bearing lubrication, there a number of stories about Chinese machines being shipped with dry bearings etc. There is no visible sign of grease on the lead screws, though if I wipe them over with a clean rag, the rag comes up grey, as though there might be a very light film of graphite grease or similar on them. What's the best grease to use here?
The manual doesn't define the grease to be used on the bearings.
Best Regards
Steve
Reply to
Steve
The crucial point being that you cannot use a Windows-based program to control your stepper motors directly because of Windows' habit of disappearing for tens of milliseconds at a time.
You cannot predict when such a delay will happen - if it happens between an X pulse and a Y pulse then you beloved 45 degree slope will be something else!
Reply to
Airy R. Bean
A mill drill needs about 450 ox in geared 2:1 for the Z axis and about 600 to 650 oz in for the X and Y You can get away with less but these are decent figures for general purpose cutting. -- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
Reply to
John Stevenson
Who said anything about pirated software? I certainly didn't. Steve need to get round to making some clamps as well! But I should think vice is quite handy for a cnc machine if you are making a complex profile. clamps would often get in the way
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