Making an air rifle

I've always fancied trying to make an air rifle - I'd buy the barrel
from somewhere as rifling it looks difficult with the equipment I have
to hand. Does anyone know if a licence is required for manufacture (it
would be under the 12ft/lbs limit)?
Reply to
Robin
Loading thread data ...
Probably not a problem as long as you can stay under the limit where a FAC becomes a requirement.
It's probably best not to talk about it too much ;-)
I used to love tinkering with air rifles. Too little time these days.
Wayne...
Reply to
Wayne Weedon
As I understand it (I am Canadian) there are no restrictions on building airguns in the UK. The law starts to pay quite close attention when one is in possesion of an airgun that can shoot over the limit when tested. That would be better checked with local sources, but that is wha I have gathered reading what I can find over the years.
There is at least one book available on the modern style of pre charged pneumatic air rifle. I have not yet read it, but the reports I have seen are quite favorable.
"THE MODERN PNEUMATIC AIRGUN ? A PRACTICAL STEP BY STEP GUIDE TO BUILDING YOUR OWN" by H. M. Buckley
Apparently available from the folks at gunbooks.co.uk, or from the author direct at hmbuckley100(at)hotmail.com
This book covers all aspects of build and finish, of all the component parts, with the exception of the barrel, I think.
There is a book out there on building a replica of the Girandoni repeating air rifle, such as was said to be used by Napoleons troops during his traipsings around Europe at the time. Definately over the FAC limit as designed, with a 51 caliber barrel and somwhere in the region of 600-800 feet per second velocity capability.
A good read on the Girandoni here.
formatting link
There is some evidence to suggest that the Lewis and Clark expedition across pre-US North America was carrying one of these, though the timeline seems unlikely. It is known that they carried an air rifle with them.
Other than a few resourses, there is remarkably little online on actually building air guns. This is one of the more "inspirational" sites I have found
formatting link
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
Another good read is "the Airgun from muzzle to trigger" by Gerald Cardew (Designer of the famous GC2) Not sure if it's still in print, but I'll never give mine up, which I bought direct from the author.
Wayne...
Reply to
Wayne Weedon
As a hobbyist no licence is required.
As a manufacturer, technically a RFD is required, BUT its a grey area, cause in manufacture its always possible to exceed the limit by mistake rendering the maker to have manufactured a firearm without authority. But then again its all only technical.
Put it this way. If a guy made an airgun, a legal 12ft lbs one, and then went out and shot a policeman in the eye, they would have him for everything, but just getting caught with it would not incurr any trouble provided it was the legal limit.
Reply to
Nospam
I would check with the authorities before commencing the build of any firearm regardless of whether it is under the FAC limit for use or not.
Steve
Reply to
Steve W
If you want a barrel I can sell you a brand new Walther barrel 19inch for £32 in 22 or 177 Bob
Reply to
Nospam
If your serious about this I can put you in touch with an expert on air guns and pumps etc. This guy is a designer and well known in the Gun area. Bob
Reply to
Nospam
Thanks, Bob. Do you sell .20 calibre barrels?
Reply to
Robin
Cant see why you would want this size, not many pellets around for that !!
I'll have a look to see if there are any about
Reply to
Nospam
In article , Steve W writes
Splitting hairs I know, but is it actually a 'firearm' if no actual fire is involved in propelling the projectile ?
Archery begs the same question - if you want to annoy an archer, suggest that he 'fires' his bow instead of 'shooting' it...
Reply to
Bob Unitt
Well as far as the law is concerned and Air Rifle with muzzle energy over 12ft/Ib's is officially classed as a firearm, and requires a certificate and all the crap that goes with it. This FAC would be the same type (section 1) as you would need for a .22 rimfire, or anything else.
I guess it makes sense. I have a friend with a .25cal FAC rated air rifle, it's power would easily kill a human, He uses it for foxes. His .308 is just too much ;-)
Wayne...
Reply to
Wayne Weedon
--Kind of a stinker of a law. Probably includes slingshots.
Reply to
steamer
Like so many of our firearm laws. Although thats a long standing one. Most of the more recent laws have been kneejerk reactions to a couple of tragic events by a couple of crazy individuals.
Not sorry if my opinions offend anyone, but I stick by them! I know of quite a few people who lost a lot including their livelihoods over these laws. All of these were engineers specialising in target gun tuning, which i was also quite involved in at one time.
Some lads just love things that go bang and long may it continue....
I'd recommend the orginal poster just read the law, understand it, and just do his thing quietly. Enquiring with the authorities ie the local police force will just get you unwanted attention. Just behave yourself as best you can ;-)
Wayne...
Reply to
Wayne Weedon
Sounds like you might know Roy H ?
Reply to
Nospam
This reply is late on the topic, as I was going through the messages and just caught this one..
If you want to split hairs, it's worth realising that until very recently any airgun propulsion using other than compressed air got classed as a firearm and required a Fire Arms Certificate. This meant that most of the American made products, pretty much classed as kid's toys in North America, were not sold in the UK as they were CO2 propelled and subject to the same restrictions faced by the (then) owners of full power handguns and rifles, depending on the airgun in question.
Talk about keeping the likes of Crosman and Daisy right out of the marketplace. Almost the entire product line of Crosman pistols, and many of the Daisy ones were CO2.
The changes to that definition of the law only came about as a result (I have read) of much lobbying from the Action Pusuit Games or Paintball folk, and the Airsoft folk, as most if not all of those "airguns" use propellant gasses of one sort or another, and cannot be seen as firearms by many stretches of imagination.
As to the archers, have you seen some of the mechanical triggers available? You could make a house payment (OK, part of a house payment) on what some of them are worth. Fires indeed!
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
--Hey ya know... more good news: you folks can still build punkin' guns as they use nothing but air, bwahaha! :-)
Reply to
steamer
I think that Her Majesty's spooks class pumpkin guns as WMDs :-)
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
I'm a bit out of touch with the firearms regs... but I think I recall that guns over 2" bore where classed as artillery, and where exempt from the regulations...
regards Jonathan
Reply to
Jonathan Barnes
Splitting hairs even further, they are actually powered by a mechanical spring :o)
(kim)
Reply to
kim

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.