motor dismantle

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/richards_internet/TEMPORARY/motor.html
I'm not quite sure how difficult it's going to be to remove the stator.
With grub screw, you would think not too difficult if removed.
When grub screew removed, stator still firmly set. So, seems removing stator is not an easy job.
I'm not sure what both clips do.
Seems only one end of case is removeable.
Thanks for any advice. Rich
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Richard wrote:

If you look at the inner end of the splined shaft at the bearing face, isn't there a tiny circlip in place ?.
The stator may be pressed in, or held with shellac, but do you need to get that out and if so, why ?. Is the winding burned out ?...
Regards,
Chris
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ChrisQ wrote:

Sorry, didn't look at the second photo. Looks like you have already removed the winding - eeeek !. I suppose you have counted the turns through each leg, and their relationship ?. That will be 50-100 ukp to rewind it, sir...
Regards,
Chris
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On 23/02/2011 13:07, ChrisQ wrote:

I don't want to rewind. I actually want to see if I can put some gearing in the case.
I've drilled out two windings so I can make a tool to see if I can prise the stator free.
There is a circlip right on the shaft. That should allow the shaft to be pressed through the bearing.
Not sure what the big clip will be doing.
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On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 15:03:36 +0000, Richard wrote:

Isn't it holding the bearing in place?
--
Regards - Rodney Pont
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Rodney Pont wrote:

I think so. The stator looks like it might have a gap in it to feed the winding loops through during assembly, but may be wrong there. When you get the rotor out, there may be room to get a small set of pullers behind the end of the stator. Otherwise, I have quite a collection of 400Hz servo motor gear head assemblies from old a/c instruments etc. You are quite welcome to one of these if you know what reduction ratio you need. Most are around 1" or so dia x 1" long without the motor. May be lucky on ratio, maybe not.
My dad rewound a couple of 1/4hp or so motors when I was a kid. He first cut a rectangular piece of thin wood of the correct thickness and path length, then fixed side cheeks to make a bobbin and packed with strips of empire cloth with the wire wound on top. When the side cheeks are removed, you end up with a winding of the required length and width to feed into the stator slots. Quite a labour of love if I remember correctly, but motors were quite expensive at the time. The first one was used to electrify a cylinder lawn mower...
Regards,
Chris
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On 23/02/2011 17:28, ChrisQ wrote:

Thanks. Hi.
Well, I was wondering whether or not I could make a reduction gear using the housing of the motor. That's why the stator is removed. It's convenient to attempt that because the motor bolts onto the other part and the pinion of the (ex) motor fits the pinion inside the other part.
That means cutting the motor spindle in two (and removing the rotor)and designing a reducion gear arrangement.
Reduction needs to be 60:1, or 76.2:1 (depending what I do).
I'll make another thread about that task.
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On 23/02/2011 15:40, Rodney Pont wrote:

Yes. Two of the big clips hold the bearing in position, small one obviously held the shaft in position.
Stator now out. But I had to destroy it. No problem because I did not want to rewind.
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What do you think it will be doing? Is it there just for show? (Don't answer)
Remove the small clip, drive out the rotor (hit on the bit pointing out of the end of the casing with a soft faced hammer as it won't fit through he other way unless you use a really big hammer)
Stick the whole lot in an oven to break down the varnish and then use a bearing puller or crowbar to remove the stator windings *and* their carrier.
P.S. Do not climb in the oven with the bearing puller.
P.P.S Do not breathe the fumes
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