Taper shank milling cutters

I was recently given some as-new taper shank milling cutters (ex MoD I believe), and I am at a loss to know how to use them!
They are 3/8, 7/16 and 1/2 inch, with 6 flutes, and cutting lengths of around 2 inches. The shanks have Brown and Sharpe tapers, with tangs (no draw bar threads).
With some effort I can convert B&S to MT2, and drill and tap them for a draw bar, but I wonder how they are intended to be used (and why they all have such long cutting lengths).
Any ideas appreciated.
Mike
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mikecb1 wrote:

reamers?
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mikecb1 wrote:

I have some that came with my Myford lathe , I had never seen them before,I just fit them into my headstock spindle and use them that way . I use a bar to knock them out . Mine are definitely end mills not reamers.
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Kevin (Bluey)
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Kevin
That's interesting. What bothers me is whether the taper alone is really adequate to hold a cutter which cuts on its side.
My cutters have cutting edges on the ends as well as the sides, and no taper at all, so they don't look like any reamers I've ever seen (though they do have straight flutes....).
Mike
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Kevin
That's interesting. What bothers me is whether the taper alone is really adequate to hold a cutter which cuts on its side.
My cutters have cutting edges on the ends as well as the sides, and no taper at all, so they don't look like any reamers I've ever seen (though they do have straight flutes....).
Mike They might be "core drills". I think there are some other names for them. They are intended for drilling into holes in castings. They drill straighter and rounder than regular twist drills but require large pilot holes. Sort of a cross between a drill and a reamer.
Don Young (USA)
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Don Young wrote:

Any core drills I have ever used had four flutes ,With out going down to work shop right now and checking ,I'm sure mine have six spiral flutes and sharp corner cutting edges . I used one recently to mill down some stock to thickness ,I just tske light cuts as I was worried about the taper letting go. I have reamers too but they have a lead in on the cutting edge.
Will check it out and maybe post some pic links.
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Kevin(Bluey) wrote:

I've never seen a four flute core drill. Always been three, that I have seen.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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mikecb1 wrote:

Old (OLD!) milling machines, and jig boring machines or jig boring mills.
I have a rack of MT1 and MT2 taper cutters, all tanged, not drawbar threaded.
Range covers from 2 to 6 flutes, and I have a tee slot cutter with alternating teeth. No mistaking that one for a reamer or core drill!
Mine are marked Pratt and Whitney, Butterfield, and Union Butterfield.
As well as the majority end mills, I have one machine reamer, about an inch long, and the tee slot cutter I mentioned.
I'll se if I can get a picture or two up.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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Thanks Trevor.
If I knew how to do it I would post some pictures of my cutters. Perhaps someone could advise me - can I just add photos as a mail attachment?
Mike
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mikecb1 wrote:

Mail attachments won't work well over Usenet (which is what a newsgroup is, despite the best efforts of the RCGroups bunch). This is because usenet is a service where messages are distributed to many different servers, in their entirety, and then downloaded from there to be read, unlike a website, where there is only generally one copy, and it is read from one location.
Due to the distribution volume of usenet posts, most of the usenet servers prune off binaries or files as attachments, to keep the traffic at tolerable levels.
Best way is to load them up to a photo hosting site. Photobucket is one of many, and once they are up, in your account, you post a link to the picture that is there. Registration is free, and apart from the adverts, is relatively painless to use, once you figure out what does what.
Find the "Browse" button, or click on the "Choose files" button, depending on the version of Photobucket you end up using, choose the files from whichever source you specify, and once they have been uploaded, post a link (click once on the "direct link", then right click in your post, and "Paste" the link into it)
Another method is to upload the images to your own webspace, if you have some as part of your deal with your service provider.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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Trevor
Thanks for the tutorial. Following your instructions I have posted 3 photos on Photbucket. The reference is:
http://s325.photobucket.com/albums/k382/mikecb1_photos /
Maybe someone can identify these unusual cutters from the photos.
Mike
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They are not unusual but what were normal jig boring cutters from an era and application where tool loading wasn't high and the taper shank was sufficient for grip.
Before the advent of CNC there were shed loads of these machines making tooling and jigs to very high accuracy but little tool loading. Many had no provision for drawbar operation and quite light spindles by modern standards. They also tend to operate in in vertical plane as opposed to sideways milling [ which was actually frowned upon due to the light bearings fitted ]
These often show up in actions, sales etc as they don't really have a modern use as they will walkout the taper under side loading. I used to have loads of these but they have been parted out and just a few kept for things like tube notching where the vertical loading makes them OK.
If you have the time and think it's worth it most can have the tang cut off with a hacksaw, don't grind it may harden the end, and drill and tap for a drawbar.
John S.
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OK. Mystery solved.
Many thanks
Mike
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mikecb1 wrote:

I checked mine out today , they are exactly the same as the images ,I have a 1/2"and a 5/8 " the latter has a brand name acid etched on the taper "Summit" Joseph Thompson Sheffield England . Still very sharp .In fact I used it a few weeks ago to make some tee nuts. So how old is this tool? Is it an antique collectable ? should I cut the tang off and drill it for a draw bar or keep it and flog it off at Southerbys for a big retirement nest egg?
LOL :-)))
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