Basic stamp with gun??

Anybody do this? Connect, for example, a semi-auto pistol and try to fire it with a computer? What's your design?

snipped-for-privacy@excite.com

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Are you the same guy that's been asking about this on the Basic Stamp Yahoo Group? I don't think I want to know what exactly it is you have in mind. Sure it could be done but you'll get no advice from me, nothing personal.

-Dave

Reply to
Dave

do you trust a robot with a gun? sounds a bit lethal to me, no going back and trying again after a bad accident with that..... (unless you have a government style cover up machine behind you...)

Reply to
Englander

I wouldn't even trust my *dog* with a gun, let alone a robot.

OK, that was a bit facicious, but I won't have an ex-K9 dog, because they can be accidentally "set off". A robot with just a bit of misprogramming could put holes in all sorts of things that I don't want holes in. :)

It *could* be done, and I'm sure the military has connected guns to controllers, but I don't understand why I would want to do this.

-- D. Jay Newman

Reply to
D. Jay Newman

Reminds me of that scene in robocop where, during a demo, an ed209 orders an assistant to drop his gun, the assitant complies and the ed209 shoots him anyway. The person giving the demo simply says (in a very casual mater of fact manor) "it's just a glitch".

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Regards Sergio Masci

Reply to
Sergio Masci

This is probably the best known example:

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I wonder what was used back in the early/mid 70s when this was being developed? An AN/UYK-7, at a guess, but how did that generation of UYKs compare to today's microcontrollers? (Leaving out I/O capability, since the UYKs had separate I/O processors.)

Reply to
Rich Webb

What a great scene - I remember that. The presenter had one of the attendees pick up a weapon to demonstrate the robot's ability to identify and deal with the threat - saying that once the threat was disarmed, the robot would no longer be agressive. If I remember correctly, the robot told the person holding the gun to "drop your weapon" and began counting backward from 10. The person very quickly dropped the gun, but the robot kept counting down, failing to note that the weapon had been dropped. It was one of those scenes that the director managed to make gruesome and slightly humorous at the same time as everyone else near the person that was holding the gun scattered out of the way, while the poor person darted around looking for something to hide behind as the robot continued to count down, eventually reaching zero and opening fire. After the robot fired about a zillion rounds it then promptly retracted its guns and claimed the threat had been eliminated (or something like that). And then, as you mentioned, the capper was when the presenter claimed it was just a programming glitch that would be fixed in the next release :-)

Actually, you can see a couple of frames of the scene on this page:

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Scroll about halfway down or search for "ed-209". Apparently there was a movie "blooper" in this scene because the actor's "blood packs"

- those things that explode and splatter out fake blood making it look like you've been shot when move bullets hit you - were visible in a few frames of this scene.

Of course, real guns shoot real bullets - I can't believe someone would even consider hooking a gun to a controller. They should go and rent Robocop instead - or maybe that's where they got the idea :-/

I remember folks in another forum talking about the dangers of even using a laser pointer with a robot - how it could be very dangerous to unwary on-lookers (retinal damage). But a gun! Geez!

-Brian

-- Brian Dean, snipped-for-privacy@bdmicro.com BDMICRO - Maker of the MAVRIC ATmega128 Dev Board

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Brian Dean

Hi,

I need to detonate an atom bomb with a Basic Stamp for my highschool science project.....

Reply to
Luhan Monat

Dave wrote: : Are you the same guy that's been asking about this on the Basic Stamp Yahoo : Group? I don't think I want to know what exactly it is you have in mind. : Sure it could be done but you'll get no advice from me, nothing personal.

: -Dave

"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."

IMO, DLC

Reply to
Dennis Clark

I keep trying to picture this "Basic Stamp with gun" product. Where is the gun kept on the Basic Stamp? Do they still use a 24-pin carrier? What kind of permit does this Stamp need to carry this gun, assuming it's not in Texas?

-- Gordon Author: Constructing Robot Bases (Now Available) Robot Builder's Sourcebook, Robot Builder's Bonanza

Reply to
Gordon McComb

Pal, guns are evil. I felt it on my own skin. It killed many of my family members and friends.

"There is no good weapon."

Refa

Reply to
Refik Hadzialic

Reply to
Blueeyedpop

Be nice Gordon, Basic stamps aren't that big.

It reminds me of someone I know whose fruit trees are threatened by rats. Thought of implementing a simple break-beam controlling a pellet gun. With such technology against them, how do these rats survive. I countered with a

20,000 uF Cap, with salty cheese on the electrodes.

grrr

Reply to
Blueeyedpop

In many states here in the USA, such a device is illegal anyway. They have several different statutes that can be used against you should you fabricate such a device. The Fed's could apply the anti-terrorism laws to this too. Telling someone how to do it could get the "teller" in trouble too, not counting lawsuits and such.

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Reply to
Earl Bollinger

Don't forget they need 512 bit data encryption for security reasons. Plus they need to self-distruct in case of unauthorised tampering.

Reply to
Earl Bollinger

I didn't think 512 bit was enough. Lets go for 4096. Thay way, of somebody tries to parallell sever million stamps, it will only take a few lifetimes to break.

Reply to
Blueeyedpop

I have about 40 in my collection, but I give them a stern talking to once a year and they haven't hurt anyone yet.

best regards

Robin G Hewitt

Reply to
Robin G Hewitt

Oh, heck. You could say the same things about multi-layer Jello desserts. In the US, there's a constant risk in thinking and in sharing knowledge. I'd like to think there are people who will continue pursuing knowledge despite the risks.

As a possible tool for more open sharing, I suggest GNUnet.

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BTW, there *are* (small arms) cartridges that are fired electrically (and don't require ejection!). I don't have any first-hand knowledge of them.

--kyler

Reply to
Kyler Laird

The second year after the war was done here(Bosnia) I gave the gun back to the police. I don't really like them and what they can do

You have to see it with your own eyes what they do :'( I think you would think the same as me Robin. It is good that you keep them on a good and safe place but still it should be a place only you know and nobody else, just because of the security reasons.

Refa

Reply to
Refik Hadzialic

No, the firearm used to kill/injure had to be loaded, aimed and fired by a human being (or robot -- I guess), and so there is nothing inherently evil in what can be used as a very useful tool -- safely and without harming anyone. By the same token, anything can be used as a weapon, given intent to do harm, but of themselves, firearms are no more inherently evil than a hammer.

Having said that, there are electronic firing mechanisms -- Remington I believe had a battery operated firing mechanism which was designed to reduce lock time of the mechanical system (the time from trigger pull to firing pin strike of primer) and thus increase accuracy. I'm not sure whether that rifle is still in production, but it did require a special primer which used an electrical impulse rather than a physical strike to ignite the round. It was called the Etron ...

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As a firearms safety instructor, and range safety officer, I would have some serious problems, however with attaching a firearm to any mechanical or electronic device. If this is intended as a booby trap -- almost ALL jurisdictions have criminal sanctions against non-descriminating weapons which might cause fatal injuries -- and quite rightly so!

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