BT 100 cutting question

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Blow torch.
8-)
Ok, seriously, patience is the key. Extremely sharp Xacto knife or finetoothed razor saw are the tools. Mark a very accurate guide line and stay on it. Placing a wooden dowel inside the BT would give a solid surface to cut against if using the Xacto knife.
-- Eric Benner TRA # 8975 L2 NAR # 79398
Reply to
Eric Benner
Randy, If you don't have one, you must get a 3 foot long chunk of aluminum angle. The bigger the legs the better, around 4 inches. Clamp a block on the inside of the angle that lets the BT hang over on your cut line. Then, very slowly rotate the tube nesting in the angle while you hold that super sharp x-acto against the end of the angle on your cut line.
If you want to get really precise, make a small (1/2 inch) slot near the end of the angle. This slot is perp to the centerline of the angle. The slot is the knife slot. Slowly rotate your tube nesting in the angle and gently insert the knife in the slot until it makes contact with the tube wall. Rotate, push, cut, repeat as necessary.
steve
Reply to
default
Make a line around the tube - and use a Razor saw. Do not cut through the first time around, just slowly work around, scoring the top of the tube. Then on the 2nd run around you can begin to cut through.
Reply to
Stephen Corban
I use something similar in design to cut tubes. I screwed a single edge razor blade to the edge of my miter-box. The blade protrudes 2 or 3 mm at most. I clamp a block on the other side of the miter-box at the distance I need the cut tube to be and slowly rotate the tube against the blade while lightly forcing it into the miter-box corner and keeping it against the block. It sounds complicated but really is a simple and easy to use tube cutting jig. Having said all that, I've also used Stephen Corban's technique successfully.
Layne CAR S767 L2
tube nesting in
angle on your cut
end of the angle.
Reply to
L & K
Didn't even think about an axe. Perfect tool! (and Kurt's favorite xmas gift for people who have everything...everyone can use an axe!)
Reply to
Kurt Kesler
"Randy" wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com:
Get one of those honkin' big hose clamps. Get a piece of BT-100 coupler, or make your own with a couple of short rings of BT-100 (doesn't have to be precisely cut). Put the coupler inside for support, gently tighten the clamp down and carefully measure so that it defines a plane perpendicular to the axis of the tube. Put a new blade in your knife. Make a few passes over the tube. Rotate the clamp so the tightener gets out of the way of the section it was blocking. Stiffen the cut edge with CA and lightly sand to finish.
len.
Reply to
Leonard Fehskens
Well, if it were the holiday season, I'd be getting you an axe. Tomahawks are fine and all...but they ain't no substitute for a good axe. ;-)
Reply to
Kurt Kesler
Nope. Manual can-opener. The good one with the blade that's gear driven from the can-rotating thingy...
Number One Son's been selected to go to District Science Fair with his TEA Laser, so now the "perfect gift" would be a big-ass selenium rectifier with enough bulk to deal with a direct ~10kv DC short off a capacitor...
tah
Reply to
hiltyt
You just don't get the same look from your sister-in-law when you give her a can opener for xmas.
Now that might get you that look.
Reply to
Kurt Kesler
You know what would be *really* hilarious? Somehow finding a "Victoria's Secret" box that could contain an axe! Bet the wife, *and* the sister-in-law would ask you plenty of questions about that one!
tah
Reply to
hiltyt
I always wrap a strip of cardstock tightly around a tube, securing with tape, then lightly score the tube with a sharp x-acto blade using the edge of the cardstock as a guide. Then, continue for 2 or 3 more passes, until the cut goes through. Very clean and perfectly straight.
Reply to
BB
I prefer a good chain saw and a cranky old log splitter, but an axe is a good compliment, and while your may exhaust your back you'll never run out of gas.
Alan, keeping the home fires burning
Reply to
Alan Jones

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