Flight simulation software for Linux?

Does anyone know of a RockSim-type program for Linux? I don't need all the graphical bells and whistles of RockSim, I just want the basic
flight profile (max altitude, max speed, etc.) of my rocket when it's weight, diameter, and motor are input. Something I can download as an .RPM or a .DEB file would be ideal. Thanks in advance to all who respond.
Leslie
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http://www.cyphertext.net/~gfish/wxrasp.html but I haven't tried it...
Leslie Houk wrote:

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Will Marchant, NAR 13356, Tripoli 10125 L3
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I think somebody has run RockSim on Linux using Wine. I'm a Linux newbie so I can't speak with authority on this. Haven't tried it myself.
Leslie Houk wrote:

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Ad Astra!

Bill Sullivan
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There's a new WINE for OSX as well, I understand.
http://www.macrumors.com/pages/2006/02/20060208072514.shtml
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Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA
Opinion, the whole thing. <mail to: snipped-for-privacy@gte.net>
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So how do you execute a program on linux?? I double clicked on something that I downloaded and nothing happens! or is there some magic word to use before executing programs?
-- TAI FU
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On Mon, 06 Feb 2006 13:47:24 +0800, tai fu wrote:

You would have to install it first. If it is a "distribution-specific" packaged made for your particular version of Linux, you would use that particular command line function for package installation. For example, Red Hat (and its "clones") uses the "rpm" command (Redhat Package Manager). If it is a generic package, it is most likely in the "tar.gz" (or similar) format, in which case you will have to unpack it (i.e. "unzip" it) into the appropriate directory, and then read the README and INSTALL files (*always* read these before doing anything else). In most cases, it is a matter of compiling the source code, and then letting the resulting "make file(s)" finish the installation. (i.e. running "./configure", "make", and finally "make install" [as root]) on the package. Confusing and geeky? To the novice, yes...but it gives you a compiled application tailor-made to your specific hardware.
--

Greg Heilers
Registered Linux user #328317 - SlackWare 10.2 (2.6.13)
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Another thing, how are disks seen? I know that the root disk would be seen as "hda1" or something but suppose I have a drive C/D/E/F/G (all harddisk partitions) in windows then what would linux see it as? it is so confusing sometimes...
-- TAI FU
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On Mon, 06 Feb 2006 15:12:08 +0800, tai fu wrote:

Linux would see them, most likely, as hda1, hda2, hda3, etc. If they are Windows-formatted partitions, you would have to have them specified as such in your /etc/fstab file, if you want them automatically mounted. And then you would have them to directories that you yourself specify, usually in the /mnt directory. For example: /dev/hda1 would mount to /mnt/hda1.
My own /etc/fstab file follows. Note that I do *not* auto-mount my Windows partition (I only have one.). (My apologies if this plays havoc with text-wrap-courtesy)
...........................................
/dev/hda10 / reiserfs defaults 1 1 /dev/hda9 /boot reiserfs defaults 1 2 /dev/hda11 /usr reiserfs defaults 1 2 /dev/hda12 /home reiserfs defaults 1 2 /dev/hda1 /mnt/windows vfat noauto,owner,user 0 0 /dev/hdc /mnt/cdrom iso9660 noauto,owner,user,ro 0 0 # /dev/sr0 /mnt/cdrom iso9660 noauto,owner,user,ro 0 0 /dev/fd0 /mnt/floppy auto noauto,owner,user 0 0 /dev/hda6 swap swap defaults 0 0 none /dev/pts devpts gid=5,modeb0 0 0 none /proc proc defaults 0 0 /proc/bus/usb /mnt/cam usbfs noauto,owber,user,ro 0 0
.............................................
It is a Windows 98 partition, hence the vfat format. I can access it with the command:
bash-3.00# mount /mnt/windows
...since I have defined it in the /etc/fstab file. If I had *not* defined it, I could still mount it by specifying the appropriate options:
bash-3.00# mount -t vfat /dev/hda1 /mnt/windows
--

Greg Heilers
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