Homemade rocket cameras

Can someone post links to sites of homemade rocket cameras? I have my design
down but I'm not too sure for the pic program, I am using a Kodak F-350
since it is small, light and I believe it has an electronic shutter.
Reply to
Mike
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The link to the AYUCR page has already been posted, so I won't have to restate it. :-)
You're referring to the Kodak Advantix F350, right...? An APS camera with a fixed-focus lens. It *is* small and light, but it has a mechanical shutter that has a maximum speed of 1/250th of a second. It's also easy to modify, since the contact-points are relatively large. I have one that I have yet to test out... I'm currently working on modifications to a digital point-and-shoot camera for video recording.
For good pictures, though, I've found that the Olympus Stylus Epic can't be beat. It's only slightly larger than the Kodak camera, takes only a little more effort to modify, and takes slightly longer to advance the film (2.6 seconds versus 1.5 for the Kodak) but it has the advantage of having a variable-speed shutter that has a maximum speed of 1/1000th of a second. Also, since it uses standard 35mm DX-coded film instead of internally-coded APS cartridges - the film can be 'pushed' to maximize the shutter speed for clearer pictures.
Best of luck with the effort!
Reply to
Len Lekx
I thought it was electronic, How do I use it in a rocket if it has a mechanical shutter?
Reply to
Mike
My site (see previous post) has info about building a mechanism to activate any type of camera, electronic or mechanical.
However, the post you're replying to says that your camera has large contact points, which implies that you CAN solder leads to it for use with an electronic timer.
Reply to
RayDunakin
Old design and an obsolete camera, but...
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Reply to
Darren J Longhorn
perhaps its electromechanical? I wonder what shutter speed the astrocam is?
Reply to
Mike
You had me worried for a minute, Tonight I will start to dismantle it, and remove parts that are unessessary. This rocket will weigh more than a pound as it is.
Reply to
Mike
Very nice anyway, One thing I should mention if anyone else wants to make a rocket camera is that even with the battery removed you can get a hell of a shock from the cap, it just happened to me ouch.
Reply to
Mike
Yep, been there, done that, no fun.
Reply to
RayDunakin
Been there, done that. The involuntary muscle spasm made me throw the camera across the room.
Reply to
Darren J Longhorn
I blew a hole in a screwdriver, shorting out the leads. :-)
Which is why I tend to leave my cameras mostly intact, with only cut openings to get at the shutter contacts.
Reply to
Len Lekx
Did you get a good apogee shot?
:)
steve
Reply to
default
Trying to simulate a parachute deployment failure? lol
Reply to
Mike
LOL!!!
Reply to
RayDunakin
I might try that the next time I wire up an Olympus. It would sure beat futzing with the latch mechanism, which always seems to fall apart no matter how carefully I open the camera's casing.
Reply to
RayDunakin
I think I will do that also, since while I was wireing it up something arced to the high voltage and it wont work at all now.
Reply to
Mike
It *is* a whole lot easier. I actually wrecked two attempts to open an Olympus camera - the flimsy little wiring harness that connects the door to the internal electronics broke. :-(
You DO need a rather fine tip on the soldering iron, though... to get at the contacts without getting molten plastic on the element.
Reply to
Len Lekx
I've found that the flash won't go off in most applications... particularly if you 'push' the film.
Reply to
Len Lekx

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